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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Delicious Knish

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

A worldwide journey in search of the origins of the knish, from Brooklyn to Poland and back again.

Comments [30]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Why Movie Musicals Matter

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

A look at why "Singin' in the Rain," "The Sound of Music," and other movie musicals have become such a major part of our lives.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jazz Age Manhattan and the Making of Modern America

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

New York was transformed by the tremendous energy of the 1920s, making Manhattan the social, cultural, and commercial capital of the country.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Marriage Equality, Mouthwatering Knishes, Movie Musicals, Manhattan and Modern America

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

On today’s show: David Boies and Ted Olson discuss their five-year battle for marriage equality in front of the Supreme Court. Laura Silver describes traveling around the world to track down the origins of the knish—and finding its modern incarnations. We’ll take a look at what makes movie musicals like "The Sound of Music" and "Singing in the Rain" so popular. And Donald Miller explains how Manhattan was transformed in the 1920s and how it became the country’s cultural and commercial capital.

All Things Considered

'Freedom Summer' And 'The Watsons': Powerful TV About A Civil Rights Journey

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

This story in the "Book Your Trip" series features NPR TV critic Eric Deggans on two books turned TV shows about civil rights: PBS's Freedom Summer and Hallmark Channel's The Watsons Go to Birmingham.

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All Things Considered

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Aaron Carapella couldn't find a map showing the original names and locations of Native American tribes as they existed before contact with Europeans. That's why the Oklahoma man designed his own map.

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The Takeaway

Love Across the Sunni-Shiite Divide

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

She is Sunni, he is from a Shiite family, and they are happily married. How the inflammatory divide affects one couple's relationship - and how it has no affect at all.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Kerry, Iraq and The Path to Peace

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

As Iraq spirals deeper and deeper into chaos, tensions remain high between Ukraine and Russia, and territorial disputes in the South China Sea are mounting. Ian Bremmer, head of Eurasia Group, weighs in on the inconsistencies in President Obama’s foreign policy agenda.

Comments [4]

Morning Edition

Chicago Program Designed To Prevent White Flight Gets Renewed Attention

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

The origins of the tax districts stem from an effort decades ago to retain white residents who were concerned their property values would plummet if black families moved into their neighborhoods.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

It Can Be Good to be Stubborn

Monday, June 23, 2014

Flexibility is usually seen as a virtue, but constitutional law professor Richard H. Weisberg makes the case for intransigence, stubbornness, and inflexibility.

Comments [8]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Freedom Summer In The First Person

Monday, June 23, 2014

In June of 1964, volunteers set out to register voters in Mississippi. Their work would help change the nation. A conversation about the legacy of Freedom Summer, and what it means half a century later to the people who were there.

Comments [14]

Fresh Air

50 Years Ago, Students Fought For Black Rights During 'Freedom Summer'

Monday, June 23, 2014

A PBS documentary about the 1964 movement to get blacks to vote in Mississippi airs Tuesday. Freedom Summer director Stanley Nelson and organizer Charles Cobb discuss the dangers the students faced.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

FDR, Detroit, and Arming America During World War II

Monday, June 23, 2014

In 1941 President Roosevelt realized we needed weaponry to fight the Nazis—most important, airplanes—so he turned to Detroit and the auto industry for help. The Ford Motor Company went from making automobiles to producing the airplanes, which made all the difference between winning and losing the war. A. J. Baim discusses how they did it. His book The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm and America at Warcenters on Henry Ford and his tortured son Edsel, who, when asked if they could deliver 50,000 airplanes, made an outrageous claim: Ford Motor Company would build a plant that could make a “bomber an hour.”  

Comments [3]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Challenging the Status Quo

Monday, June 23, 2014

Zephyr Teachout has announced her candidacy for the Democratic nomination for New York governor. She makes her progressive case in her challenge to Governor Cuomo. Plus: a compromise may be in the works for the new LG headquarters near the Palisades that opponents say will ruin the view; remembering the Freedom Summer campaign, which aimed to register as many African-American voters as possible back in 1964; and a look at how GM silenced an inspector who blew the whistle on safety issues in the company's cars.

The Leonard Lopate Show

From the Outside Looking In: Online Tracking, an Unconventional Politician, Staying Stubborn

Monday, June 23, 2014

On today’s show: ProPublica’s Julia Angwin explains how online marketers are gathering more of your offline data to create increasingly intrusive and targeted ads. Then Jón Gnarr explains how he went from launching a political party in order to satirize Iceland’s political system to being elected mayor of Reykjavík. We’ll find out how Detroit went from making cars to producing a bomber an hour during World War II. And constitutional law professor Richard H. Weisberg praises intransigence in an age of increasing flexibility.

The Takeaway

The Takeaway Weekender: Guns, Red Lipstick, and An Abortion Comedy

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Welcome to The Takeaway Weekender!

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

On Juneteenth, How Reparations for Slavery Could Actually Work

Thursday, June 19, 2014

For many African Americans, Juneteenth has become the most celebrated day in American history. It is both a celebration of our victories, and a reminder of how much more there still is to do in the fight for racial equality. 

Comments [5]

Using Google Earth To Document Slave History

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Archaeologists in Asheville, N.C. are on a mission: To share the city's history of slavery by using Google Earth. Jeff Keith explains the project and what's come of their findings.

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Morning Edition

Still Learning From The 'Pearl Harbor' Of The Civil Rights Movement

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Fifty years ago, three civil rights workers were killed by Ku Klux Klan members in Mississippi. Organizers who pushed for justice then are now educating youth so they can continue to call for change.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: America's Dialogue on Iraq, Immigration Troubles, and A Drug War Raging in Mexico

Thursday, June 19, 2014

1. For Many, Iraq's Chaos Hits Too Close To Home | 2. Hundreds of Undocumented Children in AZ Detention Center | 3. Undocumented Children & The Pull of the Capital | 4. An Inside Look at Mexico's Drug War