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History

All Things Considered

Digital Homestead Records Reopen A Crucial Chapter Of U.S. History

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Files detailing Nebraska's homesteading history have been digitized and are now available to the public. The milestone's part of a larger effort by the Homestead Digitization Project to put all homesteading documents from around the U.S. online. For more on the subject, Robert Siegel speaks with historian Blake Bell from the Homestead National Monument in Beatrice, Neb.

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At 50, The Civil Rights Act Creates 'Opportunities For All Americans'

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Michel Martin speaks with historians Charles Cobb and Taylor Branch about the legacy of the Act and what it accomplished.

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Mourning In The Closet: She Was More Than My Best Friend

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

StoryCorps, the team that brings you conversations between loved ones, is now highlighting voices of the LGBTQ community. OutLoud brings a story about losing a partner while living in the closet.

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Features

Photos: The Early Days of WNYC

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

WNYC

Al Tropea started at WNYC as an engineer before moving on to work at City Hall, recording various events for 37 years. Over the course of that time, he took incredible photos of WNYC in its hey-day.

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Features

Diving into the WNYC Audio Archives

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

WNYC

Over the past 90 years, WNYC has had the honor of hosting some of the world's most prominent figures on our airwaves. From Robert Frost to Miles Davis and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to Winston Churchill and Alice Monro -- we have learned about the world alongside our listeners during these poignant interviews. Take a listen to some of the most compelling guests that have graced the WNYC airwaves.

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Why We Asked Experts To Annotate The Civil Rights Act

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

On the 50th anniversary of the bill's passage into law, a host of lawyers, journalists, authors and other experts delve into its history and impact. Explore their insights in this interactive app.

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Morning Edition

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Carol Zachary was 9 when her grandfather gave her an invitation to a hanging he attended in 1917. She peppered him with questions, but the meaning of his gesture still remains a mystery, even today.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Abigail Adams and Her Sisters

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

The story of the Abigail Adams’ relationship with her two sisters, which unfolds against the backdrop of America in its transformative colonial years.

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The Takeaway

How Modernity Began 100 Years Ago

Monday, June 30, 2014

The year 1914 is most often associated with the start of World War I, but it was also a year of incredible social and artistic change. Animation was invented, blues music went mainstream, Charlie Chaplin defined the golden age of silent films - and culture was changed forever. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Pleasures of Print and Jazz

Monday, June 30, 2014

David Lewis, the producer and director of "The Pleasures of Being Out of Step", discusses his new documentary following the life and journey of Nat Hentoff, a jazz journalist who documented and lived some of the most significant political and cultural changes of the last generation.  Long-time guest Hentoff, now a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, joins in to talk about how he went from jazz to free speech to the contradictions of being an "atheist pro-lifer."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Fisher and Friends: Wildlife in New York City

Monday, June 30, 2014

A "fisher" has been spotted in the Bronx. It's an animal related to the weasel, and thought to no longer live in this area after over-hunting in the 1600s. Leslie Day, New York City naturalist, environment and life science educator at The Elisabeth Morrow School, adjunct faculty member at Bank Street College of Education and the author of Field Guide to the Natural World of New York City (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007) talks about wildlife in NYC, including what it means that the fisher is back.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Bad English Became Good English

Monday, June 30, 2014

How language “mistakes” have come to be accepted as correct—or not.

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All Things Considered

Colombia Advances In World Cup, Two Decades After Infamous Murder

Sunday, June 29, 2014

In 1994, star player Andres Escobar was killed just weeks after he scored an own goal in the Cup. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Colombian-American journalist and novelist John Rojas about the crime.

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Should Saying Someone Is 'Off The Reservation' Be Off-Limits?

Sunday, June 29, 2014

The term dates back to the 19th century when white traders would swap "firewater" for Indian goods and "off the reservation" was "a lonely and dangerous place for an aboriginal American to be."

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As Yosemite Park Turns 150, Charms And Challenges Endure

Saturday, June 28, 2014

In 1864, Abraham Lincoln set aside the nation's first federally-protected wilderness areas. Visitors have enjoyed Yosemite's wonders ever since — sometimes to the point of endangering them.

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Sarajevo Celebrates WWI Centennial With Joy And The Macabre

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Saturday marks 100 years since the Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Sarajevo. NPR's Scott Simon talks with correspondent Ari Shapiro about how Sarajevans are commemorating the event.

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Princip Pulled 'The Trigger,' But Never Meant To Start A War

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Journalist Tim Butcher's new book traces the footsteps of Gavrilo Princip, the young Serbian revolutionary who famously sparked World War I by assassinating Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria.

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The Takeaway

The Takeaway Weekender: Excessive Force, Racial Profiling, and An Infamous Crime Boss

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Welcome to The Takeaway Weekender!

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BackStory

The Supreme Court and Civil Rights

Friday, June 27, 2014

With the American History Guys

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WNYC News

America, United by a Capital Letter

Friday, June 27, 2014

A rare document written by Thomas Jefferson and now on display, declares the United States to be an entity for the first time.

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