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The Takeaway

Dr. Who Fans: Look Away Now

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

When we last left Doctor Who he had regenerated yet again from a young man, played by actor Matt Smith, to someone much older, but just as dashing. The season premiere is set for August 23rd, but much to the chagrin of the good Doctor's ardent fans, scripts from the first five episodes of the new season were leaked this week. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Celebrating WNYC's 90th Anniversary

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

For 90 years, WNYC has reflected -- and reflected on -- our ever-changing city. Here are some of the sounds and voices that have defined New York and New York Public Radio since July 8, 1924. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Wall Street Journal Turns 125

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

On the 125th anniversary of The Wall Street Journal, three editors talk about the paper's legacy, and its future.  

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Morning Edition

Oops! We Left Out 2 Words In The Declaration Of Independence

Monday, July 07, 2014

In the broadcast reading of the Declaration of Independence we inadvertently dropped two words: establish commerce. We muse about what would be different if those words had not been in the document.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Changes in the Neighborhood

Monday, July 07, 2014

The news is all bad regarding heroin in our area, but do the numbers justify calling it an epidemic? Michael Tracey, who wrote about this for Al Jazeera, discusses whether the response has been appropriate. Plus: A Green Beret who served in Afghanistan talks about the roles of special forces soldiers; and historian John Strausbaugh takes us for a spin through archival WNYC shows that document the changes that were happening in Greenwich Village in the late 1950s.

BackStory

Frederick Douglass and July 4th

Saturday, July 05, 2014

With the American History Guys

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All Things Considered

Celebrating A Star-Spangled Anthem ... That's Really Hard To Sing

Friday, July 04, 2014

It's been nearly 200 years since Francis Scott Key wrote the words of "The Star-Spangled Banner" in 1814. Set to the melody of a popular English tune, America's anthem spans one and a half octaves.

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Morning Edition

Reading The Declaration Of Independence: A Tradition Continues

Friday, July 04, 2014

More than 200 years ago Friday, the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, changing the course of history. NPR marks the anniversary each year by reading the full document.

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Soundcheck

'Dancing In The Street' Explained

Friday, July 04, 2014

The Martha and the Vandellas song “Dancing in the Street” was originally supposed to be a summer dance hit. But then the 1960’s happened — and “Dancing in the Street” took on a whole new meaning.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: An Independence Day Special

Friday, July 04, 2014

1. Krista Tippett on the Meaning of American Freedom | 2. The Untold Story of America's Independence Day | 3. Classic American Whiskey Goes Japanese | 4. American ingenuity and the Modern Animation Industry

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All Things Considered

The Long, Slow Vanish Of Britain's Illustrious Recording Clubs

Thursday, July 03, 2014

In the years following World War II, tape-recording clubs gathered significant popularity in the UK. Clubs met to share tapes of everything from bird calls to the sounds of local events. Today, though, only a few such clubs still survive.

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Do We Celebrate Independence Day Too Early?

Thursday, July 03, 2014

The Fourth of July is a time for firing up the grill and fireworks. But historian Kenneth C. Davis says Americans celebrate it on the wrong day. It's Independence Day trivia, with host Michel Martin.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

How Are You Patriotic?

Thursday, July 03, 2014

On this day before July 4th, how does the idea of patriotism change across generations?

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All Things Considered

Digital Homestead Records Reopen A Crucial Chapter Of U.S. History

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Files detailing Nebraska's homesteading history have been digitized and are now available to the public. The milestone's part of a larger effort by the Homestead Digitization Project to put all homesteading documents from around the U.S. online. For more on the subject, Robert Siegel speaks with historian Blake Bell from the Homestead National Monument in Beatrice, Neb.

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At 50, The Civil Rights Act Creates 'Opportunities For All Americans'

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Michel Martin speaks with historians Charles Cobb and Taylor Branch about the legacy of the Act and what it accomplished.

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Mourning In The Closet: She Was More Than My Best Friend

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

StoryCorps, the team that brings you conversations between loved ones, is now highlighting voices of the LGBTQ community. OutLoud brings a story about losing a partner while living in the closet.

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Features

Photos: The Early Days of WNYC

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

WNYC

Al Tropea started at WNYC as an engineer before moving on to work at City Hall, recording various events for 37 years. Over the course of that time, he took incredible photos of WNYC in its hey-day.

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Features

Diving into the WNYC Audio Archives

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

WNYC

Over the past 90 years, WNYC has had the honor of hosting some of the world's most prominent figures on our airwaves. From Robert Frost to Miles Davis and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to Winston Churchill and Alice Monro -- we have learned about the world alongside our listeners during these poignant interviews. Take a listen to some of the most compelling guests that have graced the WNYC airwaves.

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Why We Asked Experts To Annotate The Civil Rights Act

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

On the 50th anniversary of the bill's passage into law, a host of lawyers, journalists, authors and other experts delve into its history and impact. Explore their insights in this interactive app.

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Morning Edition

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Carol Zachary was 9 when her grandfather gave her an invitation to a hanging he attended in 1917. She peppered him with questions, but the meaning of his gesture still remains a mystery, even today.

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