Streams

 

History

WNYC News

The Propaganda That Brought WWI Home

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Marking the 100th anniversary of the start of WWI, a new exhibit at the New York Public Library explores the media and propaganda of the era, and how it changed the minds of Americans.

 

Comments [1]

Lover's Letters To President Harding Pushed German Cause

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Newly-released love letters from President Warren Harding to his mistress make some wonder whether she was trying to influence foreign policy. NPR's Scott Simon talks to historian Jim Robenalt.

Comment

Silent Film Fans Make Some Noise To Help ID Forgotten Treasures

Saturday, July 26, 2014

At the Library of Congress' Mostly Lost workshop, viewers are encouraged to yell out possible settings, actor names and even car models — anything that might put a name to an unidentified film.

Comment

The Takeaway

The Takeaway Weekender: A Dream of Peace, A Vacation From The News, and A Prescription for Play

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Welcome to The Takeaway Weekender!

Comments [2]

BackStory

Dress Doctors

Friday, July 25, 2014

With the American History Guys

Comment

The Takeaway

Nixon: In His Own Words

Friday, July 25, 2014

Almost 40 years ago, Richard Nixon became the first president to resign from office, facing almost certain impeachment for his involvement in the Watergate scandal. The most damaging evidence implicating Nixon was 3,700 hours of tape, recorded by Nixon himself between February 1971 and July 1973.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

#TBT Brian and George Carlin, 2007

Thursday, July 24, 2014

That time George Carlin said he looked Jesus-like in his arrest photo.
Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

Feminist Icons: From Rosie the Riveter to Beyoncé

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Just how flawless of an icon was "Rosie" herself?  And is it time we put aside the propaganda and found some new feminist icons? 

Comments [5]

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: An Elusive Path to Peace, A Church Scandal, and Modern Feminist Icons

Thursday, July 24, 2014

1. The Elusive Dream of Peace in Gaza | 2. Tax Dodgers: U.S. Fears Firms Who Choose to be 'Un-American' | 3. Arizona Inmate Takes 2 Hours to Die | 4. Feminist Icons: From Rosie the Riveter to Beyoncé

The Leonard Lopate Show

Great Art, Dismal Politics: A Tale of Two Italies

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Joseph Luzzi tells the story of his Italian family and looks at Italy's many divisions and contradictions.

Comments [5]

Radiolab

An Animal Makes A $10,000 Deposit, But Not At The Bank

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

A Beverly Hills auction house has an unusual fossil for sale. It's not an ancient animal. It's something an ancient animal left behind — and it's very, very long.

Read More

Comments [5]

The Takeaway

Who Killed KGB Agent Alexander Litvinenko?

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Amid growing tensions between Russia and the west, the U.K. government has decided to revisit the controversial death of former KGB Agent Alexander Litvinenko who was poisoned with radioactive polonium-210 in London in 2006.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Dangers in The Sky, A Mysterious Death, and The Future of Play

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

1. When the Skies Are Too Dangerous to Fly | 2. Who Killed KGB Agent Alexander Litvinenko? | 3. Powerful Politician Kills Bill to Protect Vets | 4. Designing Outdoor Play With Creativity in Mind

Fresh Air

How Scientists Created A Typhus Vaccine In A 'Fantastic Laboratory'

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Arthur Allen's new book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl, describes how a WWII scientist in Poland smuggled the typhus vaccine to Jews — while his team made a weakened version for the Nazis.

Comment

The Takeaway

In Russia, Propaganda Mounts Around MH17 Crash

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

In Russia, media coverage of the Malaysia Airlines crash is miles away from the way the situation is being depicted in the West. Kevin F. Platt talks about the role of Russian propaganda, and Dmitry Babich gives the perspective from Moscow.

Comments [2]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Shifting Landscapes

Monday, July 21, 2014

The U.S. and Iran have had a tumultuous relationship for decades. Seyed Hossein Mousavian, scholar at the WIlson School at Princeton and former Iranian diplomat, gives an insider's look at America's failed relationship with Iran — and how to move forward. Plus: Governor Christie's trip to Iowa; an international edition of Monday Morning Politics; the fatal arrest on Staten Island; and we meet the new TLC commissioner.

Astronaut Who Walked On The Moon: 'It Was Science Fiction To Us'

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Forty-five years after man first walked on the moon, Alan Bean, who was part of the second lunar landing, talks to NPR's Arun Rath about his stormy launch and how he translates space travel into art.

Comment

Why An African-American Sports Pioneer Remains Obscure

Saturday, July 19, 2014

The story of Alice Coachman Davis, who died last week, offers plentiful reminders about mid-century attitudes on race and gender. But ultimately, her story is about transcending all that.

Comment

The Takeaway

The Takeaway Weekender: Music and Memories, Literary Classics, and a Breakthrough in Science

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Welcome to The Takeaway Weekender! 

Comment

All Things Considered

New York's 'Night Of Birmingham Horror' Sparked A Summer Of Riots

Friday, July 18, 2014

The shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer in New York City led to six days of rioting in Harlem and Bedford-Stuyvesant — the first in a series of violent protests in 1964.

Comment