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The Leonard Lopate Show

The 'Infidels' and 'Atheists' Who Founded America

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

A look at the the ancient and pagan influences on the Founding Fathers—from Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Young, who kicked off the Boston Tea Party.

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The Takeaway

Lessons From My Jewish Mother & Palestinian Father

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The daughter of a Palestinian father and a Jewish mother, Claire Hajaj's expertise on the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians is personal. Her new novel is based on the story of her parents who met and fell in love at at British university in the summer of 1967 as the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians raged on.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Last Surviving Hiroshima Bomber Dies

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The last member of the U.S. crew that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima during World War II has died. Theodore Van Kirk was 93-years-old. As a 24-year-old, Van Kirk was the navigator of the Enola Gay, a B-29 Superfortress that dropped the world’s first atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima.

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WNYC News

Antique Ship Mystery Solved

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The clue: a Revolutionary white oak.

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The Takeaway

Can the West Curb Russia's Bad Behavior?

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Even though the pressure is mounting from both Europe and the United States, it's possible sanctions may not go far enough. What’s taken the U.S. and E.U. so long to reach consensus on sanctions? And how is this changing the relationship between Western Europe and Russia?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hopes and Dreams, Challenges and Lies

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, reveals what President Nixon knew and when he knew it, and what happened during that mysterious 18 1/2 minute gap. When he was growing up, Brando Skyhorse was told that his father was an American Indian—but as he reveals in a new memoir, the situation is a lot more complicated. Tracy Droz Tragos discusses her award-winning documentary “Rich Hill,” about boys growing up in a struggling rural town in Missouri. She’s joined by one of the teenagers she profiles in the film. Plus, a look into the philosophical ideas that inspired America’s revolutionaries--from Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Young, who started the Boston Tea Party.

The Leonard Lopate Show

What Did Nixon Know and When Did He Know It?

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

A look at the Nixon presidency, the Watergate break-in and how it changed American politics.

Comments [16]

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Turning the Screw on Russia, Wide-Open Senate Races, and The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in One Family

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

1. Can the West Curb Russia's Bad Behavior? | 2. Lessons From My Jewish Mother & Palestinian Father | 3. Last Surviving Hiroshima Bomber Dies | 4. The 2014 Midterms: The Open Races to Watch

All Things Considered

Forget Tea Pot Dome: Harding's Love Letters Make For A New Steamy Scandal

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The Library of Congress has released the rather racy love letters that former President Warren G. Harding sent to his mistress, Carrie Fulton Phillips.

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Morning Edition

Ghost Cats And Musket Balls: Stories Told By Capitol Interns

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Giving Capitol tours to constituents is a primary duty of Hill interns. They provide a great deal of information, but sometimes they're a little short on actual history.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

America’s Role in the Unfolding Chaos in Iraq

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Frontline examines the unfolding chaos in Iraq: How did we get here? What went wrong? And what happens now?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

America's Secret War Against the Soviets in Afghanistan

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The story of the defeat of the Soviet 40th Red Army in Afghanistan, which proved to be the final battle of the Cold War, and was aided by U.S. intelligence.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Spy Who Infiltrated NY’s Nazi Underground

Monday, July 28, 2014

In the most successful counterespionage operation in U.S. history, German-American William G. Sebold became the FBI’s first double agent, spearheading a covert mission to report on a spy ring in the days leading up to World War II.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Looking Back at the Crash of United Flight 232

Monday, July 28, 2014

A pilot tells how pilots flew a plane with no controls and flight attendants kept their calm in the face of disaster. Amazingly, 184 of 296 passengers lived.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hunger in the World's Wealthiest Nation

Monday, July 28, 2014

Tracie McMillan looks at the face of hunger in this country and why millions of working Americans are struggling to feed their families. PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman of On The Media’s TLDR podcast stop by. We’ll find out about a covert mission to infiltrate New York’s Nazi underground in the days leading up to World War II. And pilot Laurence Gonzales tells the harrowing story of United Airlines Flight 232, which crashed on a runway in Iowa 25 years ago—amazingly, more than half of the people on board survived.

The Washington Report

The Washington Report

Monday, July 28, 2014

Kerry Nolan talks with The New York Times' David Sanger.

A Flashback To A World On The Precipice Of War

Sunday, July 27, 2014

On the eve of World War I, the United States was a vastly different place than it is today. NPR's Arun Rath talks with UC Davis history professor Eric Rauchway about life in the U.S. 100 years ago.

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WNYC News

The Propaganda That Brought WWI Home

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Marking the 100th anniversary of the start of WWI, a new exhibit at the New York Public Library explores the media and propaganda of the era, and how it changed the minds of Americans.

 

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Lover's Letters To President Harding Pushed German Cause

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Newly-released love letters from President Warren Harding to his mistress make some wonder whether she was trying to influence foreign policy. NPR's Scott Simon talks to historian Jim Robenalt.

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Silent Film Fans Make Some Noise To Help ID Forgotten Treasures

Saturday, July 26, 2014

At the Library of Congress' Mostly Lost workshop, viewers are encouraged to yell out possible settings, actor names and even car models — anything that might put a name to an unidentified film.

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