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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Fighting Boko Haram, Remembering Oklahoma City, and Saving Songbirds

Friday, April 17, 2015

The Takeaway visits the front-lines of Nigeria, we remember the Oklahoma City Bombing, and Jonathan Franzen asks us to imagine a world without birds.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Clinton Campaign Week One; How to Think About Sex; Child Support Woes

Friday, April 17, 2015

Week one of the Clinton campaign; how to think about sex; the logic problem that puzzled the Internet; how child support laws punish parents and how LBJ's "Great Society" came to be. 

All Things Considered

Family Of Unaccounted For USS Oklahoma Sailor Wouldn't 'Let Him Go'

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Edward Hopkins was on the USS Oklahoma when it was attacked in Pearl Harbor, and was one of hundreds buried as an unknown. His family is grateful for the decision to try to ID some of the remains.

Comment

The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Fried yellow chilis. Baja-style fish. Not the typical Chinese restaurant fare, unless you're near the U.S.-Mexico border. The reasons why go back to an 1882 law enacted to keep Chinese out of the U.S.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Ukraine in Perspective

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Eugene Rumer and the professor and author Rajan Menon offer historical context on the Russian/Ukraine conflict and talk about what's at stake for both countries and the West.

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Filming the Police, Jane Goodall's Lifelong Work, A Culinary Computer

Thursday, April 16, 2015

The Takeaway looks at the state of technology and policing in America, Dr. Jane Goodall drops by to discuss her new film, and we cook up a recipe from IBM's supercomputer Watson.

The Brian Lehrer Show

A Slice of History: Pizza in NYC

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

The first time "pizza" was mentioned in The New York Times was in 1944. Pizza enthusiast Scott Wiener delves into the introduction of the Italian staple to the city.

Comments [24]

The Takeaway

Senator Introduces Bill to Put a Woman's Face on the $20

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

A non-profit group is trying to put a woman on the $20 bill by 2020. And now at least one U.S. senator is taking notice.

Comments [14]

The Takeaway

The Road to a Sustainable Future

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

With a crisis on nearly every continent, world governments are negotiating a set of  goals focused on ending extreme poverty, preventable diseases, and curbing climate change. 

Comments [1]

NYPR Archives & Preservation

A Wigwam in Brooklyn

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

WNYC
Boerum Hill was once nicknamed Little Caughnawaga for the Mohawk community that lived there as they braved great heights constructing the Empire State Building and more.
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WNYC News

The Rookie Behind James Franco's New Movie

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Pamela Romanowsky could have gone to medical school, but she ended up writing and directing “The Adderall Diaries,” which is premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival.  

Comments [1]

Morning Edition

Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

On the 150th anniversary of President Lincoln's death, Morning Edition's Renee Montagne and historian Terry Alford explore John Wilkes Booth's life, and how the assassination affected his family.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Social Security Overhaul; The Trans-Pacific Partnership; A Dollar Slice

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Christie's overhaul of Social Security; the Trans-Pacific Partnership; the Pope addresses the Armenian genocide; Times Square as an urban model; the history and evolution of pizza.

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Sustainability, Childhood Freedom, and Composting Corpses

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

The Takeaway explores new international goals on climate change and poverty, the debate over "free-range" parenting, and a new initiative to compost the dead.

All Things Considered

Andrew Johnson's Presidency Highlighted Issues With Vice Presidential Selection

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

NPR's Robert Siegel interviews University of Virginia historian Barbara Perry about the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Andrew Johnson presidency.

Comment

Tea Tuesdays: The Evolution Of Tea Sets From Ancient Legend To Modern Biometrics

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Legend has it that a Chinese emperor first discovered tea more than 4,700 years ago. As the culture surrounding tea has changed through the centuries, so, too, have the tools we use to drink it.

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The Takeaway

Frida Kahlo's Unpublished Love Letters For Sale

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

This Wednesday, a New York auction house will put 25 love letters written by Mexican artist Frida Kahlo up for sale.

Comments [1]

Lincoln's Private Side: Friend, Poet, Jokester

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

On the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's assassination, we learn that the 16th U.S. president was a public powerhouse — with fascinating private dimensions.

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Morning Edition

Revisiting The Night Abraham Lincoln Was Shot 150 Years Ago

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

On this day in 1865, John Wilkes Booth shot President Lincoln. Renee Montagne talks to author James Swanson at Ford's Theatre. (This piece initially aired on Feb. 12, 2009 on Morning Edition).

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WNYC News

City to Acknowledge It Operated a Slave Market for More Than 50 Years

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

WNYC
Wall Street's new historical marker will explain that in the 1700s, New York had an official location for buying, selling and renting human beings.

Comments [22]