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History

Might A Brush With Death Set The Stage For Greatness?

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Izola Ware Curry, who stabbed but did not kill Martin Luther King Jr., has died. NPR's Scott Simon wonders about other public figures who came close to death, but went on to great things.

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WNYC News

An Ironic Ode to Photography

Saturday, March 21, 2015

In an era when everyone is a photographer, Polish artist Piotr Uklański is trying to make sense of the medium with his new exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum.

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The Takeaway

The Invention That Changed March Madness

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Welcome to The Takeaway Weekender Podcast!

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BackStory

A-dressing a Mystery

Friday, March 20, 2015

With the American History Guys

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

The Ticker of Times Square

Friday, March 20, 2015

WNYC
"Times square would never be the same if anything happened to its one serious note in a sea of frivolity."
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WNYC News

Lincoln, the Jews and Sore Feet

Friday, March 20, 2015

A new exhibit shows the American president opposed anti-Semitism, which was rampant even among the generals in the Union army, and relied on a Jewish doctor to cure his troubled toes. 

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Morning Edition

'A Proud Walk': 3 Voices On The March From Selma To Montgomery

Friday, March 20, 2015

Following the Bloody Sunday crackdown in Selma, Ala., Martin Luther King Jr. called for support across the U.S. People of different races and religions flocked to the state. Three of them look back.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Corporate Consciousness, Adrenaline Junkies, and a New Avant-Garde Novel

Friday, March 20, 2015

The Takeaway explores Starbucks' #RaceTogether campaign, the psychology of extreme obstacle course races, and author Tom McCarthy drops by to discuss his new book.

When The KKK Was Mainstream

Thursday, March 19, 2015

In 1920s America the insidious Invisible Empire was not only visible; it participated in otherwise polite society.

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A First For Joe: Biden Could Break Tie To Confirm Attorney General

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Vice presidents have cast 244 tiebreakers in the Senate, but if Biden rescues Loretta Lynch's bid, it will be the first time it has been used for a Cabinet nomination.

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WNYC News

Orphans, Slaves and Cabaret: Four Playwrights Take on History

Thursday, March 19, 2015

A hip-hop musical about a founding father; two irreverent takes on slavery; a 24-hour play about life in America from 1776 to 2016. Here's how four playwrights are telling U.S. history.

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Fishko Files

Celebrating a Pianist's Birth Centennial

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Friday marks 100 years since the birth of Sviatoslav Richter. As WNYC’s Sara Fishko tells us, this Russian pianist masterfully broke the mold. Here is this Fishko Files.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Post Post, A Sampling and Tribute to Some Classic Live Morning Music Moments

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Speaking of......you're listening to WNYC, New York.
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Morning Edition

25 Years After Art Heist, Empty Frames Still Hang In Boston's Gardner Museum

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

On March 18, 1990, robbers stole $500 million in art from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Author Stephen Kurkjian explains why anyone would bother to steal work so priceless it couldn't be sold.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: American Millionaires, Women on the $20 Bill, and Champion Sledders

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

The Takeaway explores new figures on America's millionaires, we discuss a new campaign to put a woman's face on the $20 bill, and we visit Alaska to check in on a dog sled race.

Cervantes' Remains Have Been Found In Madrid, Scientists Say

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Almost 400 years after his death, researchers have found bone fragments that seem to match what they know about the celebrated author's burial.

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Tea Tuesdays: Gift Of The Moon, Bane Of The Spanish — The Story Of Yerba Mate

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Legend has it the moon gifted this drink to the Guaraní people of South America. It was banned by the colonial government. The Jesuits made it their most profitable crop. Oh, and the pope drinks it.

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All Things Considered

Can New York Police Build Trust Among Public Housing Residents?

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Many New York public housing residents once trusted the police who patrolled their communities. Since an officer killed an unarmed man in public housing, some are pressing to change police tactics.

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The Takeaway

We Were Here: Measuring the Human Footprint

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

A new study in the journal Nature explains why the years 1610 and 1964 have most gravely contributed to climate change.

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To Eat Authentically Irish This St. Patrick's Day, Go For The Butter

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

From 3,000-year-old peat bogs to 19th-century Brazil to modern foodies, the love of Irish butter has spread far. The secret to Ireland's deliciously rich, creamy butter is in its rolling green hills.

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