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New Sounds

Finno-Ugric Folk Songs

Saturday, August 10, 2013

You probably don’t speak Udmurtian. Or Vepsian. Or Ivorian, Karelian Finnish, or Livonian. They are all Finno-Ugric languages – relatives of Finnish and Hungarian – that are spoken in what was the former Soviet Union.  Overwhelmed by Russian, they have not survived as well as Finnish, Hungarian, or even Estonian. Some only have a few dozen speakers. That’s why musicians like Veljo Tormis, the group Hedningarna, and Markku Ounaskari & Samuli Mikkonen have become so interested in the folk songs of these people. We’ll hear these songs in arrangements for chorus, rock band, and jazz ensemble on this New Sounds.

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New Sounds

Finno-Ugric Folk Songs

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

You probably don’t speak Udmurtian. Or Vepsian. Or Ivorian, Karelian Finnish, or Livonian. They are all Finno-Ugric languages – relatives of Finnish and Hungarian – that are spoken in what was the former Soviet Union.  Overwhelmed by Russian, they have not survived as well as Finnish, Hungarian, or even Estonian. Some only have a few dozen speakers. That’s why musicians like Veljo Tormis, the group Hedningarna, and Markku Ounaskari & Samuli Mikkonen have become so interested in the folk songs of these people. We’ll hear these songs in arrangements for chorus, rock band, and jazz ensemble on this New Sounds.

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New Sounds

New Folk from Northern Europe

Sunday, May 22, 2011

For this New Sounds, listen to music based on the traditions of northern Europe. Hear some punkass Polish nu-folk from the Warsaw Village Band's release, "Infinity" along with party music from Hedningarna, the "heathens" who remain true to the polska, a three-beat rhythm unique to Sweden.  Also, there's music from Denmark’s Sorten Muld, Norwegian/Sami singer Ande Somby, and more.

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New Sounds

Finno-Ugric Folk Songs

Thursday, April 07, 2011

You probably don’t speak Udmurtian. Or Vepsian. Or Ivorian, Karelian Finnish, or Livonian. They are all Finno-Ugric languages – relatives of Finnish and Hungarian – that are spoken in what was the former Soviet Union.  Overwhelmed by Russian, they have not survived as well as Finnish, Hungarian, or even Estonian. Some only have a few dozen speakers. That’s why musicians like Veljo Tormis, the group Hedningarna, and Markku Ounaskari & Samuli Mikkonen have become so interested in the folk songs of these people. We’ll hear these songs in arrangements for chorus, rock band, and jazz ensemble.

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