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Heat

WNYC News

List of NYC's Worst Landlords and Buildings Released

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

WNYC

Public Advocate Bill DeBlasio is hoping to publicly shame apartment owners who’ve violated the law by not fixing their buildings. He’s added 318 landlords to his third annual list of the worst in the city.

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WNYC News

Explaining the Heat Index: How Forecasters Determine How Hot You Feel

Thursday, August 04, 2011

Each summer, weather forecasters start tell their audiences how hot it is according to the thermometer and how much hotter they feel, based on the heat index.

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The Takeaway

Intense Drought Devastates Corn Crops

Monday, July 25, 2011

For farmers in the Midwest and the corn-belt, intense temperatures couldn’t have come at a worse time. The heat wave hit during the crucial pollination period essential for a healthy crop and coming on the back of months of dry weather in the South. Corn prices rose amid fears for this year’s yield and analysts are watching carefully to assess the longer term impact on the economy.

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Features

Despite Heat, Conservators Wash and Wax Staten Island Monuments

Wednesday, June 08, 2011

On the docket for treatment were the 1893 bronze "Neptune Fountain" at the Snug Harbor Cultural Center, a 1915 sculpture of the Civil War captain Major Clarence Barrett across from Staten Island Borough Hall, and Allen Newman's iconic "The Hiker" in Tompkinsville Park.

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WNYC News

Why WNYC Practiced Bad Science: In Other Words, Don’t Try This at Home

Friday, July 23, 2010

A real scientific experiment requires consistency. You have to take repeated samples. And you need to use the same equipment each time.

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WNYC News

Hot and Cool Spots in the City Remain a Mystery

Friday, July 23, 2010

It’s no secret that cities are often hotter than their surrounding regions. For one thing, they’re crowded with warm bodies. And they contain lots of machinery to power our lights and keep our cars and transit systems moving.

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WQXR News

Heat Wave Keeps City Firefighters Busy

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

As New York City wilts under its second brutal heat wave this month, New York City firefighters are on pace to have their busiest year in history. July has been an especially busy month. While the city saw record-breaking temperatures, the fire department has responded to a record number of emergencies in the last couple of weeks. Scorching heat waves present special firefighting challenges.

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WQXR News

Scorching Heat Bakes the Big Apple

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

Forecasters say it could hit 99 degrees in the city on Wednesday, with humidity that could make it feel like triple digits.

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Features

See Spot Sweat

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

NPR

You think you’re hot? Imagine being encased in fur. Then think about how hot you would be.

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WQXR News

Con Ed Preps for Record Electricity Use

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

More than 3 million customers in New York City are expected to turn on their AC to beat the summer heat.

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WNYC News

How Hot is it on NYC's Subway Platforms? So Hot...

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

On a day when the temperature outside was 92 degrees, it was 106 degrees on the uptown platform of the 1,2,3 line at Times Square.

On a day when the temperature outside was 92 degrees, it was 106 degrees on the uptown platform of the 1,2,3 line at Times Square.

Every summer, New Yorkers have one more thing to kvetch about: the heat on the subway platforms. You know, that eighth circle of Hell where your clothes turn wet with sweat and you find yourself smelling way too many things you wish you didn't know about.

Thankfully, and without getting all religious about the experience, there is salvation once a train pulls up. All subway cars are air conditioned. And the difference between the heat of the platform and the chill of the train is so striking, you might wonder why storm clouds aren't forming in between.

We wanted to see how big a difference there really is by taking a digital thermometer down to the trains. WNYC web producer Amy Pearl accompanied me. We started at the Houston Street stop of the 1 train, where it was 95 degrees on the platform - about 3 degrees warmer than it was outside. Once we got on the train, the numbers on the hand-held thermometer rapidly fell to 76 degrees. It wasn't as cold as some passengers would have liked. But it was far more comfortable than our next stop.

The uptown platform of the 1,2,3 line at Times Square felt like the blast of a furnace. Amy held out the thermometer and watched in horror as the numbers ticked upward. 'So far it's 94! 95! 96!' she exclaimed. 'It feels really hot, actually. Your hair is looking really frizzy.' It was getting big.

The thermometer appeared to settle at about 101 or 102. But when a train passed by, with a rush of more hot air, it climbed to 106. 'It’s really hot and humid there’s no air in this station, you can’t take it,' one woman told us, looking miserable.

We got on the 2 train with Katherine Guerrera, a 21 year old rider from Westchester. She was wearing a long-sleeved blouse and a skirt. She said she was grateful for the cold air of the subway train. It was 74 degrees at that point. But she said the trains can sometimes get too cold. 'Usually when you have on a skirt or something or even a T shirt after a while it can get a little chilly in here.' The temperature fell to 70 degrees as the express train continued heading to 72nd Street.

Inside a car on the uptown 2 train it was a cool 72 degrees.

Inside a car on the uptown 2 train it was a cool 72 degrees.

When we got off the train at 72nd Street, the platform was also about 100 degrees. We turned around and headed back downtown on the 2 train. Again, the train was about 72-73 degrees.

It turns out that's exactly how New York City Transit wants it. Leon Stanevich, director of Maintenance Support, says air conditioning units on subway cars are programmed by their manufacturer to aim for 72.5 degrees. There are 3 points on the ceiling of each car that transit workers scan with readers, on a regular basis, to make sure they're achieving that ideal setting. Stanevich also says the cars have sensors which can adjust to how many people are on the trains. When the trains get crowded, the air conditioners pump even harder. That's why they can feel especially cold if a whole crowd of people leave at once. The units can also malfunction. Some have gotten too cold, sending temps into the 60s. And, of course, they can break down. We all know the sign: an empty train in the summer.

With New Yorkers being told to conserve energy - and save money - by keeping their homes at 78 degrees, we wondered if the cars were too cold. But Stanevich said that wouldn't make sense because the doors are constantly opening, meaning trains would get much hotter without the setting at 72.5. He also reminded us that the settings cannot be manually changed. If they were, he said, there would be chaos. Cars on the subway trains in Chicago and Boston are also set at around 72 degrees, according to their transit authorities. But in Washington, D.C. the metro adjusts to something 10-15 degrees lower than whatever it is outside in summer.

Washington also has air chillers on its platforms - something that only exists in New York at Grand Central.

Sarah Wigfall, waiting to take the 4 train up to the Bronx, said it felt

Sarah Wigfall, waiting to take the 4 train up to the Bronx, said it felt 'wonderful' under the chiller at Grand Central station even though the temperature was 87 degrees. It's the only station with chilled air in the subway system.

New York City Transit says the Lexington Avenue line platforms are unusual because they get air cooled from Grand Central Terminal above. At the downtown platform of the 4,5,6, the temperature was 87 degrees. So 'chill' is still a relative term.

New York City Transit also has fans scattered throughout the system. Stations built after 1989 have them. So do some deep underground platforms in Washington Heights, at Union Square and in Times Square near the shuttle. There's no fan at the Grand Central side of the shuttle, where musician Moses Josiah was playing 'This Little Light of Mine' on a saw. Josiah is from Guyana so he said he's used to the heat. It was 89 degrees where he was sitting. He also said he's 80 years old, though you'd never know it. He said he just drinks lots of water to cope with the heat.

Musician Moses Josiah plays the saw at the shuttle stop in Grand Central Terminal, and says he gets used to days when it

Musician Moses Josiah plays the saw at the shuttle stop in Grand Central Terminal, and says he gets used to days when it's 89 degrees on the platform.

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WNYC News

103 Reasons the Back of Your Neck is All Sweaty and Gritty

Friday, August 21, 2009

The temperature was 103 degrees Friday afternoon on the Number 1 train platform at 72nd Street

The temperature was 103 degrees Friday afternoon on the Number 1 train platform at 72nd Street

Make no mistake, it's hot and sticky out there.

...

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WNYC News

80 Big Apple Summers

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

coolingcenter

The thermometer climbed high enough to open cooling centers throughout the five boroughs for the second day in a row on Tuesday. One of the air-conditioned locations open to the public was the Park Slope Senior Center.

Many said ...

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On Being

Cal DeWitt and Majora Carter — Discovering Where We Live: Reimagining Environmentalism [remix]

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Environmentalism and climate change are hot topics; yet they're still often imagined as the territory of scientists, expert activists, and those who can afford to be environmentally conscious. We discover two people who are transforming the ecology of the

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On Being

Unedited Interview with Majora Carter

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Environmentalism and climate change are hot topics; yet they're still often imagined as the territory of scientists, expert activists, and those who can afford to be environmentally conscious. We discover two people who are transforming the ecology of the

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On Being

[Unedited] Cal DeWitt With Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Environmentalism and climate change are hot topics; yet they're still often imagined as the territory of scientists, expert activists, and those who can afford to be environmentally conscious. We discover two people who are transforming the ecology of the

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