Streams

Health

TB Patients That The World Writes Off Are Getting Cured In Peru

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

When a person is diagnosed with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, the treatment is so long and painful that some countries decide it's not worth bothering. Partners In Health disagrees.

Comment

WNYC News

The Two Leukemia Patients Whose Survival Revolutionized Cancer Treatment

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Early experiments in cancer treatment helped move a common pediatric cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, from a death sentence toward a cure.

Comments [2]

Morning Edition

Many Doctors Who Diagnose Alzheimer's Fail To Tell The Patient

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Only about half of Medicare patients are told of the diagnosis by their doctor, a study finds. That compares to 90 percent of patients diagnosed with cancer.

Comment

Morning Edition

How 2 Children With Leukemia Helped Transform Its Treatment

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Cancer treatment for kids has changed dramatically since the 1960s. Back then, doctors experimented with approaches that seemed promising but were also potentially toxic. Some survivors look back.

Comment

All Things Considered

States That Expand Medicaid Detect More Cases Of Diabetes

Monday, March 23, 2015

Researchers say their study suggests that more diabetes is being detected in particular states because, thanks to Medicaid, more poor people have access to screening and care.

Comment

You're Just A Blob In Layers Of Plastic

Monday, March 23, 2015

Ever wondered what it feels like to get into one of the moon suits that Ebola workers wear for protection? At a TED Talk, Bill Gates gave audience members a chance to climb in and see.

Comment

WNYC News

Why The War On Cancer Hasn't Been Won

Monday, March 23, 2015

NPR
Medical researchers have made only modest progress treating the most common cancers since the war on cancer was declared in 1971. 

Comments [5]

All Things Considered

Why The War On Cancer Hasn't Been Won

Monday, March 23, 2015

Medical researchers have made only modest progress treating the most common cancers since the war on cancer was declared in 1971. The disease has proved far more complicated than doctors had hoped.

Comment

Stats Split On Progress Against Cancer

Monday, March 23, 2015

When you dig into the number on cancer, the results are mixed. Overall, deaths are up. But survival five years after diagnosis has improved for many forms of the disease, including breast cancer.

Comment

Living Cancer

The War On Cancer Hasn't Been Won

Monday, March 23, 2015

Medical researchers have made only modest progress treating the most common cancers since the war on cancer was declared in 1971.

Comment

If You're Going To Die Soon, Do You Really Need Statins?

Monday, March 23, 2015

Many older people are taking a lot of meds, and some drugs may not be doing them much good. When terminally ill people went off statins, they said they felt better. And it didn't increase their risk.

Comment

WNYC News

WNYC's Living Cancer Continues

Monday, March 23, 2015

WNYC
For about the last forty years, we've been fighting a war on cancer. This week, we continue our look at the progress that's been made, and what it means to live with the disease.

Comment

Morning Edition

As Ebola Crisis Ebbs, Aid Agencies Turn To Building Up Health Systems

Monday, March 23, 2015

The virus is largely contained in Liberia. But an already-fragile health care system has been devastated. Crucially important workers have died. Will the world pay attention — and pitch in?

Comment

Morning Edition

Rethinking Alcohol: Can Heavy Drinkers Learn To Cut Back?

Monday, March 23, 2015

The limit for healthy drinking may be less than you think — one drink a day for women and two for men, according to health experts. New strategies aim to help heavy drinkers reduce their intake.

Comment

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Samantha Power, Meaning in The Stars, & Tranquility in Taxes

Monday, March 23, 2015

The Takeaway talks with the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, a physicist stops by to explain his latest research, and we look at the legacy of David Foster Wallace.

90 Years After Its Discovery, No Generic Insulin Sold In The U.S.

Sunday, March 22, 2015

A low-cost version the hormone that controls blood sugar among diabetics is no longer available in the United States. This story first aired March 19 on Morning Edition.

Comment

Patients Freeze Scalps To Save Hair During Chemo

Sunday, March 22, 2015

When Brandie Saint Claire was diagnosed with throat cancer, she found a treatment that let her keep her hair during chemotherapy. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Saint Claire about using cold caps.

Comment

'How Unromantic It Is To Die Of Tuberculosis In The 21st Century'

Sunday, March 22, 2015

That's what a patient in Russia said a few years ago. In fact, 1.5 million people do die of the airborne infection each year. Here's what the world needs to do to fight this generally curable scourge.

Comment

All Things Considered

Communicating The Right Message About Ebola

Saturday, March 21, 2015

A year after the Ebola outbreak began in West Africa, NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with Adolphus Scott of UNICEF and Jana Telfer of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about the vital role of public messaging in fighting the disease.

Comment

How The First Bite Of Food Sets The Body's Clock

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Researchers are starting to learn why, when we cross time zones or pull an all-nighter, our bodies get out of sync. This story first aired March 10 on Morning Edition.

Comment