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Health & Medicine

PRI's The World

Inside the troubled early days of the Ebola response

Tuesday, May 05, 2015

Missteps dogged the early days of the Ebola response, with international groups relying on an untested government to combat the epidemic. "Letting the countries take the lead" is standard operating procedure for health agencies operating abroad.

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PRI's The World

Wake up! There's no snoozing allowed in this Canadian library

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

At the Edmonton Public Library in Alberta, Canada, snoozing in the stacks will now be banned. The new rule is part of the library's effort to redirect homeless library patrons to more appropriate support services.

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PRI's The World

Mozambique's life-saving surgeons aren't doctors at all

Monday, April 20, 2015

What do you do when there are only about 20 practicing surgeons for an entire country? Mozambique decided to train non-physicians to do surgery, giving rise to a class of medical workers called tecnicos who do almost all of the country's operations.

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PRI's The World

Unravelling an 'epidemiological mystery' about the transmission of Ebola in semen

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Scientists are still trying to determine how often and how long the Ebola virus stays active in semen.

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PRI's The World

Boston Marathon bombing survivors deal with a lingering, invisible injury — tinnitus

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

The bombings at the 2013 Boston Marathon caused hundreds of traumatic injuries. But among the most common is an invisible one: tinnitus, a persistent ringing in the ears that for some people still hasn't stopped.

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PRI's The World

These women show what it looks like to survive Ebola in Liberia

Friday, April 10, 2015

Photographer Keiko Hiromi recently documented grassroots efforts by Liberian NGOs to fight Ebola and the stigma impacting survivors.

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PRI's The World

For Ebola patients, a way to see the faces of those helping

Tuesday, April 07, 2015

Imagine being in a hospital with a deadly illness and you can't see the faces of the people caring for you. That's what it's like for Ebola patients. And it's what Los Angeles-based artist Mary Beth Heffernan went to Liberia to change.

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PRI's The World

A deadly modern disease may have an unexpected ancient cure

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Scientists are pleased with preliminary tests for a new cure for MRSA, the deadly antibiotic-resistant infection. But it's not a fancy new technology: The new remedy was found in an Anglo-Saxon medical book that's more than 1000 years old.

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PRI's The World

Why 21st-century anti-vaxxers have nothing on their 18th-century counterparts

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

George Washington certainly worried about the British army, but he may have been even more worried about smallpox, which had the potential to ravage his already-fragile army. That's how Washington became colonial America's champion of inoculation, the precursor to vaccines — but not without lots of protest.

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PRI's The World

Ebola veterans warn that vigilance is still needed as case numbers drop

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

It's been a year since the World Health Organization officially declared that there was an Ebola outbreak in West Africa. A doctor and health journalist compare notes on what has been a long and traumatic year — and an epidemic that isn't over just yet.

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PRI's The World

South Africa's new drug cocktail of choice is devastating its townships

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

South Africa is battling a new street drug called nyaope, which combines several substances so users can get a cheap high. But efforts to tackle the problem in the country's townships don't appear to be succeeding.

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PRI's The World

An American aid worker with Ebola receives speedy care, while a Sierra Leonean colleague is 'left behind'

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

An African health care professional didn't get the same care as his American colleague when he contracted Ebola at a Partners in Health-supported treatment facilities in Sierra Leone.

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PRI's The World

With 'kangaroo care,' parents can save their premature babies, just by holding them

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Infant mortality rates have been improving greatly in Ethiopia, but hospitals are still not well-equipped to handle care for babies born prematurely. Enter "kangaroo care," a technique originally developed in South America to keep premature babies in skin-to-skin contact with an adult during early, crucial weeks or months of development.

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PRI's The World

Memory Banda escaped child marriage in Malawi, but her 11-year-old sister wasn't so lucky

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

The oldest of six siblings, 18-year-old Memory Banda has managed to escape the cycle that turns half the girls in her southern African nation into brides, and usually mothers, by her age. But her sister Mercy was not so lucky.

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PRI's The World

Iran may ban vasectomies, cut access to contraceptives to boost births

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Two proposed pieces of legislation in Iran could turn the country's women into "baby-making machines" and set the country back decades in gender equality, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

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PRI's The World

Sex without the Pill? There's an app for that!

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

You might have thought of the "rhythm method" of family planning as discredited and low-tech. Not anymore. Fertility awareness mobile apps are reinventing the rhythm approach by adding precision and detail to calendar-based efforts to monitor a woman's hormonal cycle.

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PRI's The World

The debate over 'natural family planning': Does it work?

Saturday, March 07, 2015

The Catholic Church urges ‘natural family planning’ and says it has 98 percent effectiveness. A medical expert says it is closer to 80 percent — and that is in societies where a woman is able to say no to a partner's demands for sex.

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PRI's The World

Is it a good thing that McDonald's plans to limit its use of antibiotics in chicken?

Thursday, March 05, 2015

McDonald's in the US will be limiting the use of anitbiotics in chickens. Is this a good thing? Let's back up a bit. Why do farmers even use antibiotics and what's so bad about eating a chicken with antibiotics in it?

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PRI's The World

Facing a determined opposition, Pakistani officials tell parents to vaccinate their kids or go to jail

Thursday, March 05, 2015

Some parents in Pakistan so deeply mistrust the polio vaccine that they're refused over and over again to let their kids get their shots. Now one fed-up province in Pakistan, which has the most polio cases of any country on Earth, is tossing those parents in jail until they relent.

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PRI's The World

This is a place where getting vaccinated can feel festive, and what that says about the US

Thursday, March 05, 2015

In Mexico, vaccinations are seen less as an individual choice and more like a “community obligation.”

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