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Harlem

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Why Rangel Walked Out

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

An ethics panel of eight House members deliberated over two days before delivering a sad but unsurprising blow to 20-term New York congressman Charles Rangel. The 80-year-old democratic representative from Harlem was charged with 13 counts of fundraising and financial misconduct. Yesterday, he was convicted on 11 of those charges.

But not before some theatrics: Charlie Rangel refused to defend himself in the congressional ethics hearing, on Monday. Why did he walk out in protest? And what was the effect, if any?

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The Arts File

The Legacy of Maya Angelou at the Schomburg Center

Friday, October 29, 2010

Poets Maya Angelou and Amiri Baraka and professor Farah Griffin of Columbia weigh in on Dr. Angelou's legacy of documents.

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Features

The Acquisition of a Lifetime: Maya Angelou's Archives Go to Harlem's Schomburg Center

Friday, October 29, 2010

The New York Public Library officially announced the acquisition of the archives on Friday, which include handwritten notes for Angelou's autobiography "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings."

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The Arts File

Can Boys' Choirs Survive?

Friday, October 15, 2010

Choir Directors Lorna Myers and Robert Ridgell weigh in.

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The Takeaway

Previously Unheard 'Savory' Jazz Collection Discovered

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Jazz aficionados have long spoken of an unrivaled collection of the greatest jazz musicians from 1930s, including Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday and Coleman Hawkins. Now, a collection of their greatest live recordings have been discovered and stored at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, New York. We talk with Loren Schoenberg, the curator of the museum.

[CORRECTION: the original version of this story mentioned "Louise Armstrong," rather than trumpet genius Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong. We regret the error. -eds]

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It's A Free Country ®

Obama Voters Waiting for Inspiration

Friday, October 01, 2010

WNYC

"So this is incumbent upon us to do our part to get people out, to let them know, yes, maybe the president hasn't lived up to their expectations, but we can point out why. But this is no reason not to participate and not to continue to understand that elections are important."

-H. Carl McCall

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It's A Free Country ®

Cuomo's Harlem Adventure

Monday, September 27, 2010

It was intended to be an event in Harlem to demonstrate just how much African American support Cuomo can count on come November. But according to several reporters at the scene, weather and poor advance work conspired to produce a media mess.

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Features

Harlem Arts School, Back from the Brink

Saturday, September 18, 2010

School is back in session at the Harlem School of the Arts. The afterschool program which has trained Harlem children for decades in visual arts, theater, dance, and music started its fall term on Thursday.

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Studio 360

Lost Jazz Finds a Home in Harlem

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Before yesterday, I had never heard of Bill Savory.  For this, I'm thankful: If I had known about Savory, I would have wasted a lot of time and energy being very upset with him.  As a sound engineer in the 1930s, he made nearly 1,000 unique recordings of seminal jazz musicians -- and refused to let anyone hear them.

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WNYC News

Harlem Residents Gather To Address Wave of Gun Violence

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Harlem residents, clergy and elected officials gathered at Reverend Al Sharpton's National Action Network headquarters on Tuesday night to discuss the recent wave of violence that culminated in last weekend's fatal police shoot-out.

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The Takeaway

From Adam Clayton Powell Jr. to Charles Rangel: The Past and Future of Harlem's Political Leadership

Thursday, July 29, 2010

This afternoon a House ethics panel will lay out the charges against Rep. Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.), who, at 80 years old, is one of the longest-serving members of Congress. Rep. Rangel has represented Harlem since 1970, when he ousted the legendary Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Both men had long, storied careers representing what may be the country’s most famous African-American neighborhood, home to Malcolm X, Marcus Garvey, Langston Hughes, and many others. But a lot has changed in Harlem since Powell, Jr. was elected in 1945. We look back at the history of Harlem politics and the power of the "Gang of Four."

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Azi Paybarah

Towns: Rangel 'Is Going to be There'

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

WNYC

In case you’re wondering, the person with the second most seniority in the New York congressional delegation is Rep. Ed Towns of Brooklyn. He was elected to Congress in 1983. Rangel got there in 1971.

So, is he even thinking about becoming the dean of the delegation, since there’s that whole situation with Rep. Charlie Rangel?

“No it hasn’t because I know Rangel is going to be there,” Towns told me yesterday. “He’s doing well. I understand there was a poll taken and he is so far out front that it’s not even any real contest. Which means that’s he’s going to continue to be around.”

Okay.

If and when (when?) Rangel leaves Congress, it will undoubtedly by the end of a certain era in New York politics, one that saw that dominance (and some dimming) of New York’s black political establishment in Harlem.

That changing-of-the-guard moment will only fuel more chatter about how real power center of New York’s black political establishment should rightfully be acknowledged as having moved from Harlem to other areas of the city, like Towns’ section of Bed-Stuy in Brooklyn. Southeast Queens, with its cultural history, affluence and charismatic figures also can lay claim to the mantle too.

When I asked, Towns downplayed the notion there’s any rivalry or tension between the these areas and said that Rangel is revered figured citywide.

Towns recalled a recent meeting where Brooklyn constituents said things like, “You know how long it took Charles Rangel to become the chair of the Ways and Means Committee?”

Town added, “There’s a strong support base that he has, even in Brooklyn.”

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The Empire

Harlem’s Changes

Monday, July 26, 2010

Chris Smith has a good point about the changing nature of Harlem, and its politics:

Rangel’s district was 63 percent black when he was first elected; today it’s 37 percent black and 46 percent Hispanic. “Bensonhurst ain’t Bensonhurst anymore, and guess what? Harlem ain’t Harlem anymore, either,” says the Reverend Al Sharpton, who made the neighborhood his base of operations twenty years ago and is still resented as an interloper by many of the clubhouse stalwarts. “But a lot of Harlem politicians are just trying to hold on to something that’s not there anymore,” Sharpton says. “Somebody that puts together the new blacks and the Latinos and the whites is going to be able to flip the whole Harlem leadership.”

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Azi Paybarah

Rangel: More Alleged Violations, Still Optimistic

Monday, July 26, 2010

WNYC

Charlie Rangel held his third press conference in as many days, putting on an optimistic air about the ethics inquiry into him, the charges resulting from of which will be publicly released Thursday.

Before handing out scholarship awards to about a dozen local students, Rangel spoke to reporters in his Harlem office building:

“Well, we waited almost two years and they finally investigated and guess what? They have some more alleged violations.”

Rangel did not elaborate, but seemed to be refering to a number of alleged violations have been reported in the press but were not among the ones Rangel forwarded to Congress for review. They include abandoning a car in a congressional parking lot, getting a tax-break for a donor who gave money to a school he was fund-raising for, and receiving a tax break for those who make their primary residence in Washington.

When asked, Rangel said he did not feel “singled out” because of his race. He also rebuffed the premise of another reporters’ question who asked if the long-time congressman felt dismayed that Attorney General Andrew Cuomo and outgoing Governor Paterson have not committed to attending his August 11th birthday fundraiser.

“I don’t believe what you’re saying is true, nor do I believe you have any evidence to substantiate that, based on my conversations with people during the weekend,” Rangel said. “Now, let's get on with it,” he said, referring to the distribution of scholarship awards.

Later, after a three-piece band struck up some uplifting jazz music and Rangel mingled with the recipients, he expressed optimism that his friends in the Democratic party will rally around him, despite press reports to the contrary.

Specifically, Rangel was asked about Senator Chuck Schumer seemingly expressing something less than full-throttled support for Rangel. In a statement released this weekend, a Schumer spokesperson is quoted as saying "The senator is going to give Congressman Rangel a chance to get his case out there before coming to any judgment."

“[Senator Charles] Schumer has been my buddy for many many years. And just because somebody can think of a question doesn’t mean that I’m going to respond to it,” Rangel said.

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Azi Paybarah

Harlem's Changes

Monday, July 26, 2010

WNYC

Chris Smith has a good point about the changing nature of Harlem, and its politics:

Rangel’s district was 63 percent black when he was first elected; today it’s 37 percent black and 46 percent Hispanic. “Bensonhurst ain’t Bensonhurst anymore, and guess what? Harlem ain’t Harlem anymore, either,” says the Reverend Al Sharpton, who made the neighborhood his base of operations twenty years ago and is still resented as an interloper by many of the clubhouse stalwarts. “But a lot of Harlem politicians are just trying to hold on to something that’s not there anymore,” Sharpton says. “Somebody that puts together the new blacks and the Latinos and the whites is going to be able to flip the whole Harlem leadership.”

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Azi Paybarah

Feelings and Facts

Friday, July 23, 2010

WNYC

A few highlights from Rep. Rangel's brief press conference in Harlem this afternoon:


Reporter: Do you feel you did something wrong?

Rangel: "I wish feelings had something to do with the facts."


Reporter: Are you looking forward to this battle?

Rangel: "No. Hell, no."


Reporter: Message to voters?

Rangel: "I won't let you down."

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The Empire

‘Certainly it’s Not a Harlem Seat’

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Veteran reporter David Diaz gets into the ethnic politics and demographics of the NY15 race, where Rep. Charlie Rangel is facing a crowded field of Democratic challengers.

In an interview with one of those opponents, Adam Clayton Powell, host Diaz says, “Latinos, for example, outnumber blacks in that district by about 2:1.”

“How do you see it? Is it still a black seat,” Diaz asks.

“No,” says Powell, who is Puerto Rican and African-American. "Certainly it’s not a Harlem seat” and “the rest of the neighborhoods [in the district] appear to be step children. And that’s wrong.”

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Azi Paybarah

'Certainly it's Not a Harlem Seat'

Thursday, July 22, 2010

WNYC

Veteran reporter David Diaz gets into the ethnic politics and demographics of the NY15 race, where Rep. Charlie Rangel is facing a crowded field of Democratic challengers.

In an interview with one of those opponents, Adam Clayton Powell, host Diaz says, “Latinos, for example, outnumber blacks in that district by about 2:1.”

“How do you see it? Is it still a black seat,” Diaz asks.

“No,” says Powell, who is Puerto Rican and African-American. "Certainly it’s not a Harlem seat” and “the rest of the neighborhoods [in the district] appear to be step children. And that’s wrong.”

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Soundcheck

Gig Alerts: Harlem

Friday, July 16, 2010

The Austin garage punk trio play the Siren Music Festival at Coney Island Saturday. Download their fun, jangly tune "Gay Human Bones."

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Azi Paybarah

Rangel: Would There be a War 'If There was No Oil in Iraq?'

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

WNYC

Below are some highlights from Charlie Rangel’s press conference in Times Square, where Rangel announced he wants to end war funding and institute the draft:

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