Streams

 

 

Haiti

The Brian Lehrer Show

Haitian Presidential Campaign

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Ricot Dupuy, director and station manager of Radio Soleil, checks in on Haiti, from the upcoming November 28th presidential elections to the violent cholera protests that erupted earlier this week.  

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Evacuations in Haiti Under Way

Friday, November 05, 2010

We continue our coverage of Hurricane Tomas, which is expected to make landfall in Haiti today. Leonard Doyle is a spokesman for the International Organization for Migration, which arranged the evacuation of some 2,000 Haitians from Corail. He gives us an update on the evacuation effort, and tells us if the outbreak of cholera is complicating matters.

Comment

The Takeaway

Digital First Responders Fight Cholera in Haiti

Friday, November 05, 2010

Maps and cholera outbreaks have been linked since at least 1854, a year when London residents were dying in droves from a serious outbreak of the disease. At that time, no one really understood how cholera spread, or how to stop it. But then a man named John Snow painstakingly mapped the outbreak – by knocking on doors, identifying cases, and marking them down with pencil and paper. His resulting discovery — that the disease was waterborne — saved thousands and thousands of lives. One hundred fifty years later a lot has changed, but in Haiti, Snow's technique is still using mapping technology to fight disease and it's spread.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Tropical Storm Tomas Heads Toward Haiti

Thursday, November 04, 2010

Haitians officials have issued a hurricane warning as Tropical Storm Tomas barrels towards the beleaguered nation. More than one million earthquake survivors have been advised to leave their tent camps before Tomas arrives, which is expected sometime tomorrow. Besides the issue that most of these refugees have no place to go, the hurricane is expected to make the recent cholera epidemic in the country worse. Elysia Nisan, an aid worker for Save the Children, and Jacqueline Charles of The Miami Herald join us from Miami.

Comment

The Takeaway

Second Wave of Cholera Emerges in Haiti

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Another outbreak of cholera has been reported in Haiti, this time much closer to the capital of Port-au-Prince, where over a million people are still living in earthquake refugee camps. Officials report the death toll there is just under 300. That rate, however, is slowing as Haitians become more aware of the epidemic. 

Ian Rawson is the managing director of Hospital Albert Schweitzer, about three hours north of Port-au-Prince, near where the original outbreak is believed to have emerged. He says that the situation is stabilizing.

Comment

WQXR News

Haitians Suffer Amid Cholera Outbreak

Monday, October 25, 2010

As of Monday, a cholera outbreak in Haiti had killed more than 250 people and sickened more than 3,000 others, according to The Associated Press. But the AP reports that certain health officials believe the outbreak may be slowing down, citing fewer deaths and reports of new cases so far this week.

Comment

The Takeaway

Can Cholera in Haiti be Controlled?

Monday, October 25, 2010

As Haiti fights a cholera outbreak in its river valley region, all eyes turn to Port-au-Prince where over a million displaced people still live in cramped, unsanitary tent cities. 

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Campaign Finance: Influencing the Haitian Elections from the US

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

This week we’ve been talking a lot about the people and groups financially supporting political candidates in the mid-terms. But there is another national election we’re following where American money could have a major influence. Haiti’s presidential election is on November 28th. Candidates in that election have been actively campaigning State-side to raise money.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Oxfam Calls on US to Stop Subsidizing Haitian Rice Exports

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

Aid agency Oxfam Internation say that the United States' policy of subsidizing rice exported to Haiti is hampering the beleaguered nation's ability to be self-sufficient. Twenty years ago, Haiti produced nearly all of its own rice. Today, the country imports nearly 80 percent due to subsidization policies from wealth nations like the U.S. The BBC's Mark Doyle gives us the latest on the story.

Comment

The Takeaway

Haitian-American Novelist Edwidge Danticat Looks to 'Create Dangerously'

Friday, October 01, 2010

Haitian American novelist Edwidge Danticat has been busy, of late.  She has two new books hitting bookstores this fall: Eight Days is a children's book about a boy trapped in the rubble after the earthquake in Haiti, and Create Dangerously is a book of reflections on the task of the immigrant writer.

Comment

WNYC News

Haitian Leaders to Clinton Global Guests: We Need Your Business

Thursday, September 23, 2010

WNYC

The President and Prime Minister of Haiti are asking for aid, but also for investment. Both spoke on the last day of the Clinton Global Initiative, former President Clinton’s yearly effort to get business leaders involved in solving world problems.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Election in Haiti

Monday, August 30, 2010

New Yorker contributing writer Amy Wilentz talks about the elections in Haiti. Her article “Running in the Ruins” appears in the September 6 issue of the New Yorker.

Comments [6]

Features

Haiti Ruling Ends Wyclef Jean's Run for President

Sunday, August 22, 2010

Singer Wyclef Jean's high-profile bid for Haiti's presidency ended after election officials on the earthquake-ravaged Caribbean nation disqualified his candidacy.

Comment

On Being

Jacqueline Novogratz — A Different Kind of Capitalism [remix]

Thursday, August 19, 2010

The devastation of the Haiti earthquakes and the lack of infrastructure for responding to the disaster have deepened an ongoing debate over foreign aid, international development, and helping the poorest of the world's poor. Jacqueline Novogratz, whose

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Jacqueline Novogratz with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 19, 2010

The devastation of the Haiti earthquakes and the lack of infrastructure for responding to the disaster have deepened an ongoing debate over foreign aid, international development, and helping the poorest of the world's poor. Jacqueline Novogratz, whose

Comment

The Takeaway

Wyclef Jean: Haiti's Next President?

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

A story in today's New York Times takes a closer look at musician Wyclef Jean's bid to be Haiti's next president. Jean's relief organization set up for the country in 2005, Yele Haiti Foundation, was called into question this past winter, when reports found that money given to the foundation for the country's poor was poorly accounted for. But now he has stepped down from the organization to run for president of the country.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Haitian Politics Update

Monday, August 09, 2010

Ricot DuPuy, director and station manager of Radio Soleil, talks about Haitian politics and the possibility of President Wyclef Jean.

Comments [7]

WNYC News

Wyclef Jean May Launch Presidential Bid in Haiti

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

From Brooklyn to the presidential palace? That might be what rapper-turned-activist Wyclef Jean has in mind for his native country of Haiti.

Comment

Gallerina

In Haiti: Rescuing Art Amid the Rubble

Monday, July 26, 2010

WNYC

The Cathedral of Sainte Trinité sits among the hundreds of ravaged structures that teeter dangerously on the streets of Port-Au-Prince. Built in 1924, on the site of an 1860s church that was founded by African-American Episcopalians fleeing slavery, Ste. Trinité housed an extraordinary series of murals, executed in the late 1940s and early 1950s by artists who made up what is known as the Haitian Painting Renaissance.

Read More

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

Haiti: Geologic Time vs. The News Cycle

Monday, July 12, 2010

Geological events mark their evidence in rock and the position of the earth’s crust. The earthquake becomes a part of the geological identity of a place. Geology is its own narrative and it unfolds very slowly… literally in geological time for the estimated million people still waiting for help. We have a built-in sense that people bounce back from disasters. But perhaps to even look at Haiti six months after as though it is a long time is absurd. It says more about our attention span than it says about Haiti itself. Just as the presence of President Obama on the beaches of Alabama is more likely to produce a headline than the presence of oil that same beach would, it’s our attention span that is the story.

The “headline-breaking-news all-urgency-all-the-time” model of news coverage makes it very difficult to establish the narrative line to give a complex story like Haiti’s aftermath the day-to-day focus it needs. Each tree ring tells a story in the long-term record of life on earth.

Read More

Comment