Streams

 

Guantanamo Bay

PRI's The World

Eric Holder will resign, leaving a mixed legacy on national security issues

Thursday, September 25, 2014

When he joined President Obama's cabinet, Attorney General Eric Holder was expected to oversee the shutdown of the US detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. That never happened, but Holder succeeded in shifting focus back to civilian courts — but also aggressively onto leakers.

Comment

Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The Through the Looking (Google) Glass Edition

Saturday, May 25, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss how Apple and other corporations avoid paying U.S. corporate taxes. They also discuss Obama’s new drone and Guantanamo policies.

Comment

The Takeaway

What's the Future of Guantánamo?

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Wednesday marks the tenth anniversary of the United States opening a detention camp in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. The past decade has seen no shortage of controversy about the base, both on legal and moral terms. Barack Obama campaigned for president on the promise to close the base, but signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act on December 31, which includes a provision allowing indefinite military detention without trial. There are currently 171 prisoners being held there, and no signs of shutting the facility down in the near future.

Comments [1]

The Washington Report

Washington Report: Wikileaks Documents on Guantanamo Bay

Monday, April 25, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in a recently released trove of Wikileaks documents.

Comment

The Takeaway

Where Will 5 Chinese Muslims Go After Gitmo?

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

The fate of the five remaining Chinese Muslims being held in Guantanamo Bay became murkier this week. The U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal on behalf of the Uighurs — who have been cleared of any implications of terrorism. The appeal may have allowed them to stay here in the U.S. after they are released from Cuba. Sabin Willet represents the five remaining detainees. He says that the Uighurs have refused an invitation to resettle in Palau because they see it as an island exile. 

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Gitmo Song Remains the Same

Tuesday, March 08, 2011

After a two year ban, military trials for Guantanamo Bay detainees will resume, the Obama administration said on Monday. The administration said it remains committed to closing the controversial prison; this is the same pledge we've heard from the president dating back to his campaign over two years ago. However, his efforts to close the prison have been thwarted by Congressional opposition to bringing detainees on U.S. soil for trials. What are the implications for such an order for Obama and for the detainees?

Comment

The Takeaway

Guantanamo Detainees to Be Tried in Military Courts

Thursday, January 20, 2011

According to a New York Times article released today, the Obama administration is planning to prosecute Guantanamo detainees in military commission trials. This follows decisions by Congress to prevent these prisoners from being brought to the U.S. and tried in federal courts.

Comment

The Takeaway

WikiLeaks Exposes Attempted Deals to Transfer Inmates Out of Gitmo

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

While President Obama has received much criticism for failing to close the Guantánamo Bay prison camp in the first year of his presidency, new classified documents released by WikiLeaks reveal the attempted dealings between the administration and other governments to try and move detainees out of the detention center. In an article in The New York Times, reporter Charlie Savage details attempted deals with Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Lithuania and Albania, among other countries.

Currently 174 inmates remain at the facility: a third of them are from Yemen.

While President Barack Obama has received much criticism for failing to close the Guantanamo Bay prison camp in the first year of his presidency, new classified documents obtained by WikiLeaks reveal the backroom dealings between the administration and other governments to try and move detainees out of the detention center. In an article in The New York Times, reporter Charlie Savage reports on attempted deals with Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Lithuania and Albania, among other countries.

Currently 174 inmates remain at the facility, and a third of them are from Yemen.

We talk with Savage about the findings in the WikiLeaks documents. And Jonathan Mahler explains why it's been so difficult for the United States to transfer the detainees and move forward with closing the prison at Guantanamo Bay.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Ghailani Verdict

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Ahmed Ghailani, the first Guantanamo detainee to be tried by a U.S. civilian court, was acquitted on all but one of more than 280 charges Wednesday by a jury in U.S. federal court in Manhattan. Karen Greenberg, executive director of the Center on Law and Security at NYU Law School, discusses the Ghailani mixed verdict and how it plays into the ongoing debate about civilian versus military trials.

Comments [26]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Gitmo Ruling Changes

Monday, October 11, 2010

Dafna Linzer, senior reporter at ProPublica Inc., and former national security reporter for The Washington Post, examines telling differences in the original and amended versions of a judge's order to release a Gitmo detainee.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Trial to Begin for Youngest Guantánamo Detainee

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Jury selection is set to get underway today in his controversial trial of 23-year-old Canadian Omar Khadr, the only Westerner remaining at the Guantánamo Bay detention center in Cuba. Khadr currently faces five charges of war crimes, including the fatal wounding of U.S. Delta Force soldier Christopher Speer in Afghanistan. Khadr has been imprisoned at Guantánamo Bay since the age of 15. This trial is the first war crimes trial under the Obama administration. 

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Alleged Cover-up of Prisoner Deaths at Guantánamo

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Several soldiers who served at Guantánamo Bay in 2006 have alleged that the deaths of three Guantánamo inmates, previously ruled suicides by the U.S. government, were nothing of the sort ... and that the government has covered up the truth.

Comment

The Takeaway

Guantanamo Reunion

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

A former guard at Guantanamo Bay has reunited with two of his former prisoners from Britain after he contacted them on Facebook.

Comment