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Great Depression

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Inspiration Strikes After Tragedy: Alfred Kazin on His New Yorker Trilogy

Friday, November 02, 2012

WNYC

Starting Out in the Thirties (1965), the second installment of Kazin's New Yorker Trilogy, had just been published when he gave this brief talk on the genesis of his artistic motivation at a 1965 Books and Authors Luncheon.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

James T. Farrell on a Writer's Inner Life

Monday, September 24, 2012

WNYC

James T. Farrell, the creator of Studs Lonigan, is often thought of as a crude, dogged, naturalist writer; it's refreshing to hear the author speaking, in this recording from 1952, of what truly obsesses him: literature.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Intrepid City College Staffers Record Dust Bowl Refugees for WNYC Documentary

Friday, June 10, 2011

Robert Sonkin and Charles Todd were working at the City College Department of Public Speaking when they decided to spend their summer vacations in 1940 and '41 at the Farm Security Administration (FSA) camps of central California. With the help of Alan Lomax, their project was underwritten by the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress. Carrying a "portable" 50-pound Presto disc cutter, they recorded cowboy songs, traditional ballads, square dance calls, camp council meetings, storytelling sessions and the personal experiences of the Dust Bowl refugees who lived in the camps.  Drawing from more than 200  field recordings, the folklorists produced the above documentary for WNYC in 1942, one of three in a broadcast series called Songs of the Okies

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The Takeaway

Where's the Great Art from the Great Recession?

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

The Great Depression produced some of the greatest novelists in United States history: John Steinbeck, John Dos Passos, Zora Neale Hurston, Nathanael West. In 2011, as the U.S. recovers from the worst economic disaster since the Great Depression, our next guest wonders why the Great Recession hasn't yet generated a book like "The Grapes of Wrath." Michael Goldfarb is a freelance reporter. His article, "Where Are Today's Steinbecks?" appeared on the BBC.

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The Takeaway

Comparing Childhoods in Great Recession and the Great Depression

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

A new study from the U.S. Department of Agriculture finds that over 17 million American families — nearly 1 in 8 — went hungry at some point in the last year. The figures include as many as one million children. The family hardships of our current Great Recession inevitably recall stories of the Great Depression, an era when many Americans came of age scrimping and saving every penny and every last crumb. So how will the experiences of the children of the Great Recession compare to those who were kids during the Great Depression? 

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The Takeaway

Income Inequality May Have Big Costs For Economy, Country

Monday, August 30, 2010

A small group of economists are trying to study whether income inequality may have contributed to the economic collapse. The income gap in the years leading up to the recent recession, which is often compared to the Great Depression, has a striking resemblance to the income equality in 1928, when the top 10 percent of earners received nearly half of the total income. Finance reporter Louise Story wrote about this theory for The New York Times earlier in August, and we spoke with her about the income gap on The Takeaway last week.

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