Streams

 

Graphic Novels

Studio 360

“The Sculptor”: An Artist Makes a Deal with the Devil

Thursday, March 12, 2015

In Scott McCloud’s new graphic novel, “The Sculptor,” an artist trades his life for a chance at artistic immortality. 

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Studio 360

Shaun Tan's Magical Worlds

Friday, August 08, 2014

Bestselling author-illustrator Shaun Tan constructs eerie, vaguely sinister worlds in his gloriously detailed picture books. For a long time, he didn’t understand why bookstores put them in the children’s section. Now the father of an infant daughter, Tan’s starting to come around.

Slideshow: Shaun Tan’s illustrations

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Studio 360

Gene Luen Yang’s Chinese Superheroes

Friday, March 21, 2014

Boxers & Saints by the graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang tells the story of China’s Boxer Rebellion in vivid, explosive color. In the year 1900, peasants violently rejected Western businesspeople and Christian missionaries in their country. The Boxers, as they were called ...

Slideshow: Inside the book

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Selected Shorts

Short Stories about Women Finding Themselves

Friday, February 14, 2014

Two women find what they love, in stories presented by guest host Jane Kaczmarek.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: Chris Ware

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Cartoonist Chris Ware was on the show to talk about his graphic novel box set Building Stories. He shared his guest picks with us.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Chris Ware's Building Stories

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Chris Ware talks about Building Stories, a box set of a decade’s worth of work. As seen in the pages of The New Yorker, The New York Times and McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, Building Stories is a set of comics that imagine the inhabitants of a three-story Chicago apartment building. Ware has been broadening the boundaries of what comics can be and what kinds of stories they can tell.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Alison Bechdel on Memoirs

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Alison Bechdel, cartoonist and author of the graphic memoir Are You My Mother? A Comic Drama, reflects on the creation of memoirs, her long-running comic strip "Dykes to Watch Out For" and her approach to graphic novels.

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The Takeaway

A Conversation with 'Maus' Creator Art Spiegelman

Friday, December 09, 2011

In 1973, Art Spiegelman published a three-page comic strip in a small underground publication called "Funny Animals." It was the first installment of what he called "Maus," the biography of Spiegelman's father, Vladek — a Holocaust survivor — with anthropomorphic mice standing in for Spiegelman, Vladek, and his fellow Jews. The complete graphic narrative was eventually published in two volumes. In 1992, nearly twenty years after he began work on the project, "Maus" was given a special award from the Pulitzer Prize Committee — to date, the only graphic novel honored by the Committee.

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Studio 360

Neil Gaiman Continued

Saturday, October 01, 2005

A god walks into a bar, flirts with the tourists, and has a heart attack singing karaoke, leaving his two sons to stumble into a conflict older than civilization. Gaiman explains how his new book Anansi Boys is not really a fantasy novel — it's a comedy inspired by P.G. ...

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Studio 360

Grrl Comix

Saturday, December 08, 2001

In the old days, comic books written for female readers tended to be soap operas and adolescent fantasies drawn by men. We talk to two female comic artists of different generations, Jessica Abel and Trina Robbins, about their work. 

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Studio 360

Art Spiegelman on Comics

Saturday, December 08, 2001

Kurt Andersen and writer and cartoonist Art Spiegelman talk about the narrative and artistic spell of comics. 

Spiegelman is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Maus and Maus II. Since 1992 he has been a contributing editor and cover artist for The New Yorker. He is also the co-founder and editor ...

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Studio 360

Shakespeare and Sandman

Saturday, November 25, 2000

Shakespeare’s influence in the comic book novel Sandman, by British author Neil Gaiman.

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