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Government Shutdown

It's A Free Country ®

Politics This Week: Questions About Christie and the Government Shutdown Showdown

Monday, September 26, 2011

It just underscores how dissatisfied Republicans are with their field as it stands...I see this every four years it seems—the party that's trying to take back the White House is unhappy with their candidates—but this time it's really striking.

— New York Times national correspondent Jackie Calmes on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Minnesota Ends 20-Day Government Shutdown

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Minnesota's state government is poised to re-open after an almost three-week shutdown.  Lawmakers agreed late in the night on a budget. It could mean some 22,000 state workers will return to work as soon as Thursday, and ends a political impasse between Democrat Governor Mark Dayton and Republican legislative leaders. So what's in the deal, and how will it affect taxpayers? 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Government Shutdown Averted

Monday, April 11, 2011

Jake Tapper, senior White House correspondent for ABC News, discusses the 11th hour budget deal and what to expect from President Obama's deficit plan to be unveiled on Wednesday.

→ Listen, Read a Recap, and Add Your Comments at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Government Shutdown Averted... What's Next?

Monday, April 11, 2011

A government shutdown was averted in the 11th hour last Friday, as Congress and the White House came to a temporary resolution on the budget crisis. President Barack Obama will give a speech on Wednesday night detailing how he hopes to reduce the deficit. But the budget debate is not over, and is actually just beginning, according to The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich. Republicans want spending drastically reduced, and Democrats want taxes increased — this will make for an even more dramatic confrontation between party lines as the issue of the debt arrives.

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It's A Free Country ®

Ten Ways the Government Shutdown Will Mess Up Your Life

Friday, April 08, 2011

It feels a little like watching the ball drop in Times Square on New Year's Eve—only, everyone's dreading midnight. The government shutdown is mere hours away. Those hardest hit will be federal employees, who won't see their paychecks for a while. For the rest of us, here are ten things that will experience turbulence if and when the government shuts down.

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The Takeaway

How Middle East Revolutionaries Would View a Shutdown

Friday, April 08, 2011

Nicholas Kristof, columnist for The New York Times and Mina al Oraibi, Washington D.C. Bureau Chief for the Arab-language newspaper Asharq al Awsat talk about the view of the U.S. government shutdown from the Arab world. As revolutions have spread throughout the Middle East this year, American politicians have had a lot to say about the importance of democracy in the region. But today, as the U.S. government teeters on the brink of a shutdown, do these words ring hollow to Arab revolutionaries? What would a shutdown look like to the countries fighting for democracy in the Middle East?

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The Takeaway

How Hard Will a Government Shutdown Hurt the Economy?

Friday, April 08, 2011

With less than a day before the current stopgap budget bill runs out, President Obama met with Congressional leaders to try to prevent a government shutdown. But politicians are not just worried about the fallout a shutdown could have for their 2012 campaign. There is also a worry about the economic ramifications, which would ripple down from Capital Hill to Wall Street and, ultimately, Main Street.

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It's A Free Country ®

Weiner Takes on Ryan and Shutdown

Thursday, April 07, 2011

I dispute that it's a very courageous document. In fact it's basically the same kind of political things we've heard from this party for a long time, they're not particularly fond of Medicare, they have real contempt for Medicaid, yet they don't have any ideas of how to reduce costs on their own, all it's doing is cost shifting.

—Rep. Anthony Weiner on Rep. Paul Ryan's 10 year budget proposal, speaking on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

What Happens If There's A Shutdown

Thursday, April 07, 2011

As the budget deadline draws near, many citizens and businesses are wondering what will happen if Congress fails to agree on a budget before Friday at midnight. Paul Kane congressional reporter for The Washington Post, and Charlie Herman WNYC's business and economics editor, outline what actually happens if the Federal government shuts down, which workers would get paid, and how it would affect everyone else.

→ Read a Recap, Listen, and Add Your Comments at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

The Economic Impact of a Government Shutdown

Thursday, April 07, 2011

If Washington lawmakers cannot come to an agreement on the nation’s operating budget by Friday, the government will be forced to shut down many of its non-essential functions, sending thousands of government employees home without a paycheck.  

Over 800,000 federal employees were furloughed in the nation's November 1995 shutdown, and about 284,000 workers were sent home in a second shutdown a month later. Combined, those two shutdowns cost the government about $1.4 billion. However, those shutdowns coincided with a time when America was experiencing one of its longest periods of financial growth. If the shutdown were to occur on Saturday, it would be doing so in a very different financial climate.  

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The Takeaway

Shutdown: Which Federal Workers Are 'Essential'?

Thursday, April 07, 2011

Friday's potential government shutdown directly affects “non-essential" employees, putting them at risk of taking a furlough. However it's not only this class of employees that will feel the effects of shutdown. There are serious economic ripple effects and, more simply, it costs money to shutdown the government.

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The Takeaway

Tea Party's Rep. Farenthold: 'I Don't Think We're Extreme'

Thursday, April 07, 2011

Everyone says that nobody wants a government shutdown, but freshman lawmakers who are backed by the Tea Party are being pressured not to compromise. Meanwhile, in private talks, House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) and Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.) met with President Obama Wednesday night. They said they made progress. However, there is no compromise yet, explains Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich, who is following developments in Washington.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Weiner Takes on Ryan

Thursday, April 07, 2011

US Congressman Anthony Weiner (D-NY 9th) talks about Paul Ryan's budget proposal and the prospects of a government shutdown in the next two days.

→  Listen, Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's a Free Country

The Takeaway

Your Take: Government Shutdown and Essential Jobs

Thursday, April 07, 2011

As a government shutdown looms, we're asking listeners who they might hold accountable, and you've got a lot to say on the subject. After the announcement that even after a shutdown, some "essential" public jobs would remain, we've also been asking about how one defines essential jobs. When you think about your own job, do you think you're "essential"? Why or why not?

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It's A Free Country ®

Nobody Wants a Government Shutdown...or Do They?

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

At 8:45 pm Wednesday night, President Obama will sit down with House Speaker John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to try and hammer out a last-minute budget compromise before the government shuts down on Friday.

A shutdown would mean furloughing thousands of government employees, delaying Social Security payments to seniors, and closing national parks, among other things. Freezing federal business is also more expensive than business as usual. With all these negative consequences looming beyond this Friday's budget deadline, nobody wants a government shutdown...or do they?

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The Takeaway

Medicaid and Medicare Under Rep. Ryan's Budget

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Congressman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), unveiled his budget yesterday, proposing cuts of some $6.2 trillion over the next decade. Medicare and Medicaid will fundamentally change under Ryan's plan — with Medicare losing $389 billion, and $735 billion being cut from Medicaid. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent details what parts of the budget will affect Americans the most. Theda Skocpol, professor of sociology and government at Harvard University, explains how Medicare and Medicaid will change under Ryan's plan.

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The Takeaway

Preparing For a Government Shutdown

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

House Majority Leader John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid sat behind closed doors yesterday, trying to come to compromise over the budget, but leaders in both parties seemed to be bracing for a real government shutdown by the end of the week. President Obama urged both Democrats and Republicans to put aside petty differences and come to a compromise. If they don't, every federal agency will have to come up with a contingency plan, especially the Office of Management and Budget, and the Office of Personnel Management. 

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The Takeaway

Are You Essential in Your Job?

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

With a government shutdown looming, non-essential federal workers will be asked to stay home. When you think about your own job, do you think you're "essential" or not? Why/why not?

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It's A Free Country ®

Budget Showdowns, Government Shutdowns, and Paul Ryan's Proposal

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

You need to take on entitlements, but you also need to deal with the revenue side of picture. The fact that [Rep. Paul Ryan] left the Bush tax cuts intact certainly skews the program such that people who come out better are people who are richer, and people being asked to shoulder the burden are those on the lower end of the income scale.

John Heileman, national affairs editor for New York magazine, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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It's A Free Country ®

Rep. Jim Himes: Budget Debate 'Profoundly Dishonest'

Monday, April 04, 2011

We're spending almost $800 billion every single year on the Pentagon, on our security. That's more money than every other country on the planet combined spends. That's not a sustainable thing, neither are the now three combat actions around the world. If we're going to be serious about long term sustainability, we're going to have to do, frankly, what [Defense] Secretary Gates proposed, which is $130 billion in cuts to the defense apparatus.

Jim Himes, U.S. Congressman (D-CT-4), discussed the budget negotiations on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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