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Global Warming

PRI's The World

Coral reefs can communicate with fish, and many of them are crying for help

Thursday, August 21, 2014

With corals in trouble around the world, researchers are examining the role of smell in telling fish to come to a healthy reef or stay away. That may help scientists find ways to manipulate the smells to help damaged reefs recover.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Warm Weather and Climate Change

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

The first six months of 2012 were the hottest on record. Deke Arndt, chief of the climate monitoring branch of NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center, takes a look at record warm temperatures across the county and the world and their connections to global warming.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Horn of Africa in Crisis

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Jeffrey Gettleman, East Africa bureau chief for The New York Times in Dadaab, Kenya, and Shannon Scribner, humanitarian policy director at Oxfam America, discuss the famine in Somalia and the growing humanitarian crisis in East Africa.

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The Takeaway

Bad Weather a Harbinger of Climate Change? Not Likely

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

The holiday blizzard of 2010 knocked East Coasters out of their routines this week, but there was a hint of deja vú as the snow fell. Big weather events have been making headlines across the country and around the world for several years, now. Last week, enough snow fell in Minneapolis that the roof of the Metrodome collapsed. Blizzards crippled Western Europe's airports and rain deluged San Diego. Is this bad weather part of a new normal? Is global warming bearing down on us at a hastening pace?

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The Takeaway

Energy Experts Skeptical of Cancún Climate Talks

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

The U.N.’s climate talks in Cancún moved into their second week on Monday. The agenda is dominated by future cuts in carbon emissions and keeping countries honest about their actions to control global warming. Expectations, however, remain low following last year’s talks in Copenhagen, which resulted in no binding agreement to manage the world's carbon emissions.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

30 Issues: Climate Change

Monday, October 25, 2010

Ryan Lizza, Washington correspondent for The New Yorker magazine, talks about the failure of climate change legislation this year and where it stands in the current political debate. 

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The Takeaway

Thinking Our Way Out of Extinction

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Are there limits to the kinds of problems humans are capable of solving?

It can certainly seem like it. The conflict in Afghanistan rages on, the schools keep failing, the world is warming up. We throw ideas at these problems, we dream up fixes, we try new cures, yet the problems continue. The conflict rages on. The kids keep dropping out. The hurricanes get stronger. It’s enough to make you throw up your hands and wait for the end times.

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The Takeaway

Climate Change Skeptic Now Calls for Massive Effort to Halt Global Warming

Thursday, September 02, 2010

A new book about how to solve the looming issues of climate change will hit shelves here in the U.S. in October. It’s called “Smart Solutions to Climate Change: Comparing Costs and Benefits.” It sounds unsurprising enough, but the author, Bjørn Lomborg, is a controversial figure in the debate on climate change. He’s long been known as a climate change skeptic and has been the subject of vehement criticism for his doubts as to whether global warming is a gravely serious issue.

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The Takeaway

The Ptarmigan: A 'Canary' for Climate Change?

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

The Ptarmigan, a mountain bird known in Colorado for its camouflaged exterior, may be at risk due to climate change. Because the birds are limited to alpine habitats, scientists worry for their survival as temperatures rise and snow and ice melt. Last week, environmentalists began a campaign to designate the bird as a threatened species. If the designation is accepted and approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, it would require action to combat the threat of climate change, which could lead to legislation to reduce carbon emissions.

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The Takeaway

The End of the World As We Know It?

Thursday, August 26, 2010

All this week, we've been talking with our friends from Scientific American about endings — how cultures fade, and natural resources dwindle. Today, we’re focusing on something even bigger: the end of human life as we know it — in other words, the apocalypse. The question of course, is how will it happen? Nuclear war? a killer virus, or perhaps an environmental disaster?

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The Takeaway

The End: How Much is Left?

Monday, August 23, 2010

Is it the end of the world as we know it? This year, we’ve seen terrible flooding, glaciers melting, and deep oil wells breaking. In light of these catastrophic events, we're launching a series this week about whether our modern age is coming to an end along with our friends at Scientific American.

For the first installment of the series, we talk with Michael Moyer, staff editor for Scientific American, about the world's dwindling resources. He recently wrote about this in his article, "How Much is Left?"

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The Takeaway

What This Summer's Natural Disasters Mean for Planet Earth

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

The number of people affected by the massive flooding in Pakistan over the past week is larger than the combined total of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Flash floods have hit neighboring Kashmir, killing at least 85 people, and China where more than 1,300 people are feared missing. In Europe, a heat wave has led to the deaths of 5,000 people, and in Russia drought and wildfires are ravaging the country.

Are all these simultaneous natural disasters this summer just a big coincidence, or is it a harbinger of something more serious for Planet Earth? Environmentalist Bill McKibben connects the dots and finds out how much it has to do with global warming.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Climate Fixes

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Five years ago, geoengineering was considered to be "fringe."  Jeff Goodell, author of How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth’s Climate, talks about how the controversial idea of adjusting the world's thermostat is starting to look sane.

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The Takeaway

Sports: Final Four, MLB Season Opener

Friday, April 02, 2010

Move over, Thanksgiving. Easter weekend is shaping up to be a big one for televised sports. The Final Four square off in Indianapolis Saturday, and Major League Baseball opens (in a major way) at Fenway on Sunday. Takeaway sports contributor Ibrahim Abdul Matin joins us to talk about what the weekend holds for the NCAA, and for the Yankees and the Red Sox.

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    The Takeaway

    Copenhagen Summit Heats Up in Final Days

    Thursday, December 17, 2009

    The UN's historic climate change conference in Copenhagen wraps up tomorrow. There are persistent fears that the end could come without a major, binding climate change agreement between the 193 countries. “The next 24 hours are absolutely crucial,” warned UN climate change official Yvo de Boer. (...continue reading)

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    The Takeaway

    Hotter Planet Allows Shortcut Through Arctic

    Monday, September 21, 2009

    For hundreds of years, mariners have dreamed of a shipping shortcut through the Arctic that would allow them to speed trade between Asia and the West. Two German ships became the first-ever Western commercial vessels to sail that route, thanks to the recent thawing and withdrawal of the Arctic sea ice due to global warming. BBC Moscow correspondent Richard Galpin tells us what he saw as one of the first journalists onboard this historic journey.

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    The Takeaway

    A Conversation with Secretary of Energy Steven Chu

    Friday, July 24, 2009

    Steven Chu, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy, is reaching out to developing nations like China to negotiate on climate change. (He also reaches out to average Americans through Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.) Steven Chu joins The Takeaway's guest host Katherine Lanpher to talk about the task of creating real progress in the fight against global warming.

    You can connect with Secretary Chu through his Facebook page and see photos of what the Department of Energy is working on through the department's Flickr and Youtube pages.

    "When I was in China, we signed an agreement that we were going to be cooperating on three areas in particular: Building efficiency, transportation — more efficient vehicles and electrification of vehicles — and finally, cooperating on how we can learn to use coal in a clean way, including the capture and storage of carbon dioxide."
    —Secretary of Energy Steven Chu


    Click through for a transcript of this interview.

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    The Takeaway

    U.S. and China Heat Up the Global-Warming Debate

    Friday, June 12, 2009

    Top climate change officials from China and the U.S. met this week in Beijing to hash out a pre-Copenhagen plan for cutting greenhouse gas. The two countries are the world’s top two greenhouse gas emitters, according to the Brookings Institution. Together, they account for more than 40 percent of annual emissions. Any solution to the greenhouse gas problem may require both countries to transition to low-carbon economies.

    Just back from a trip to China is Assistant Energy Secretary David Sandalow, who joins The Takeaway to discuss how talks are going. Click through for the full transcript of the interview.

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    The Takeaway

    The Sixth Extinction

    Monday, May 18, 2009

    Some biologists believe that we are now in the midst of what they call “the sixth extinction”—the sixth time in the history of the earth when a devastating mass extinction has occurred. New Yorker staff writer Elizabeth Kolbert says that some estimate that half of all species may have disappeared by the end of this century. She joins The Takeaway to explain what may be causing this event, and what can be done to stop it.

    For more, read an abstract of Elizabeth Kolbert's article, The Sixth Extinction? in The New Yorker. If you are a subscriber to the magazine, you can read the entire article.

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    The Takeaway

    Environment: 'Cap and Trade' and Climate Change

    Friday, May 15, 2009

    Regulating greenhouse gases has been one of the most contentious issues for the EPA. In 2003, the agency ruled that carbon dioxide could not be regulated as a pollutant. A 2007 Supreme Court decision ordered the EPA to review the scientific case for that decision, but the Bush administration ignored that ruling. With the new administration in place, things are expected to change. Lisa Jackson, the new Administrator of the EPA, joins The Takeaway to explain the Agency's plans. Also joining the conversation is Congressman Fred Upton, a Republican Congressman from Michigan, who is the Ranking member of the House Energy and Environment Subcommittee. He's one of the leading opponents of cap-and-trade and the Waxman-Markey climate bill working its way through Congress. He joins The Takeaway with his opposition to the bill and why he thinks it would mortgage our future.
    "The biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are in our transportation sector, the cars and trucks on the road, and then utilities, the way we generate power."
    —EPA administrator Lisa Jackson

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