Streams

 

Global Economy

The Washington Report

Government Shutdown's Impact on Global Markets; and NSA Chief Defends Agency

Monday, October 14, 2013

Eddie Robinson talks with New York Times Chief Washington Correspondent David Sanger about the ongoing government shutdown and its impact on global markets. They also discuss the head of the NSA's attempt to defend his agency's surveillance programs amid criticism from America's allies.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Removing Borders Stimulates the International Community

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Robert Guest, global business editor of The Economist and author of the new book Borderless Economics: Chinese Sea Turtles, Indian Fridges and the New Fruits of Global Capitalism, explains how fostering a global community can fight against poverty, oppression and economic instability. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Political Risk Abroad

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group, talks about what the instability in the economies in the Middle East and Japan might mean globally.

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The Takeaway

Assessing Japan's Quake; Remembering China's

Monday, March 14, 2011

James Fallows of The Atlantic magazine is currently in Beijing, but he has lived and worked in Japan. He also witnessed the powerful earthquake that hit China in 2008. China, still scarred by the 2008 Sichuan quake, has expressed admiration for the way that Japan has responded to Friday's earthquake. Although the relationship between China and Japan strained, many Chinese have expressed compassion for the country.

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The Takeaway

As Global Economy Grows, Can America Keep Up?

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

If President Obama’s weekly YouTube address is any indication, America’s ability to compete globally will be an issue very much on the table during his State of the Union speech tonight. So what are the areas where we’re out-competing other countries? And are jobs and economic growth the most important indications of success in the competitive global market?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Cotton, Chocolate and Coffee: Prices on the Rise

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Global prices of cotton, coffee and chocolate are on the rise. WNYC business and economics editor Charles Herman talks about the possible effects on inexpensive t-shirts, your morning latte, and candy bars.

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The Takeaway

Ahead of G20, US Financial Policy Faces International Criticism

Monday, November 08, 2010

Later this week, world leaders will gather at the G20 summit in Seoul, South Korea. The meeting comes just days after the Federal Reserve's decision to buy $600 billion worth of Treasury bonds through a process known as "quantitative easing." In response to the announcement, American stock markets reacted positively. World leaders abroad did not.

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The Takeaway

China Hikes Interest Rates for First Time in 3 Years

Friday, October 22, 2010

China's central bank surprised the global market by increasing its interest rates for the first time since 2007. Being that it's the second largest economy in the world, the decision to increase interest rates has the global economy feeling the effects. Gold and oil prices dropped, while stocks took a negative turn in Europe and the dollar jumped.

Joining us to discuss is Sewell Chan, Washington correspondent for The New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Grim Numbers Do Not Bode Well for Economic Outlook

Friday, August 13, 2010

With Wall Street indexes down for a third straight day yesterday and poor economic reports in recent weeks, the outlook for global economies does not look bright.

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The Takeaway

Ash Cloud's Economic Fallout Reverberates Throughout Globe

Monday, April 19, 2010

Four hundred tons of flowers sat rotting in the cold room of an airport in Kenya over the weekend, waiting to be shipped to Europe. These flowers are among the first collateral damage of the Icelandic ash cloud which has turned most of Europe's airspace into a no-fly zone and delayed travel for some 6.8 million people.

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The Takeaway

Is Women's Empowerment the Solution to World Hunger?

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

The United Nations is reporting that the world is hungrier than ever. This year, the number of people going hungry will top 1 billion for the first time – not a milestone anyone wanted to reach. But a new report claims to have the solution: Give women more power. The BBC's Mark Doyle joins us with the story.

For more, download the International Food Policy Research Institute's Global Hunger Index for 2009 (PDF, 2.7 MB)

Check out the interactive world hunger map from the International Food Policy Research Institute to see how countries are faring:

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The Takeaway

IMF Says Global Recession Ending

Thursday, October 01, 2009

The International Monetary Fund says the global recession is ending. In its twice-yearly assessment of the economic outlook for the world, the IMF predicts a 3.1 percent global economic growth rate. We talk with the BBC’s economics correspondent, Andrew Walker.

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The Takeaway

G-20: Assessing the Health of the Global Economy

Thursday, September 24, 2009

The G-20 summit gets underway today in Pittsburgh, and world leaders are hoping this big economic pow-wow will help stabilize a global economy still struggling back to its feet. For an assessment of how the global financial system is faring — and to gauge if bankers have held off an even Greater Depression than the last one — we turn to Liaquat Ahamed, author of "Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World."

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The Takeaway

"Steel City" Plays Host to Wealthy Nations

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Scenes of Pittsburgh in "Flashdance."

You could say it's like the 1980s movie "Flashdance": It's set in Pittsburgh and the main character (the city) has shed its blue-collar threads for something more glamorous. This week "The Steel City" plays host to world leaders as the site of the G-20 economic summit. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette columnist Tony Norman has lived through the city’s ups and downs and responds as the world comes to his town.

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The Takeaway

President Obama's UN Debut

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Yesterday President Obama took to the international stage as he made his United Nations debut. From yesterday’s climate change summit to tomorrow’s nuclear disarmament talk — and anticipated flourishes from Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Libya's Muammar Gaddafi along the way — we take a look at President Obama’s global positioning with worldly thinkers Richard Wolffe and Reihan Salam. Richard Wolffe is a journalist and author of the bestselling book "Renegade: The Making of a President." Reihan Salam is a fellow at the New America Foundation and editor of The American Scene.

Watch the president's address to the United Nations:

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The Takeaway

Stopping Human Trafficking, One Slave at a Time

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

Each year, more than 27 million people are trafficked illegally around the world. Stories of modern-day slavery and human trafficking are heartbreaking. But what can one person do about it? Aaron Cohen found a way to help victims. He put his “skills” as a former drug-addicted, rock-and- roller (he used to work with the front man for Jane's Addiction) to infiltrate brothels from Cambodia to Colombia, from Iraq to Israel. Then he would buy the freedom of enslaved girls. It’s a controversial approach to dealing with the problem of human trafficking. Aaron Cohen has just written a book called Slave Hunter: One Man's Global Quest to Free Victims of Human Trafficking, with journalist Christine Buckley. They both join The Takeaway to discuss the work and the controversy. Cohen is the founder of Abolish Slavery.

"It is controversial – the idea of contributing to a market [for young girls]. But I saw it from more of a micro-perspective: there was this child in front of me and I had to make a choice. What am I going to do for this child? I thought that if I could go one child at a time, that micro would add up to macro later."
—Aaron Cohen on his decision to buy the freedom of young trafficking victims

Jaunty Therny, a young trafficking victim, seen here at age 13 when Aaron Cohen met her in a bar in Cambodia. He bought her freedom.

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The Takeaway

In the Eyes of the Pope, Profit as Sin

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Tomorrow President Obama heads to Italy for the opening of the G8 summit. He will meet with Pope Benedict, who has just issued a new encyclical calling for a new financial world order. In the paper, called "Charity in Truth," the Pope draws on traditional Catholic teaching in rebuking the profit-at-all-costs mentality of the global economy. Greed is a mortal sin, after all. For more, The Takeaway talks to David Willey, Rome correspondent for our partners the BBC.

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The Takeaway

Why Ghana is Growing

Friday, May 15, 2009

In the current economic climate, it's hard to imagine a place where the economy is growing by 4, 5, or 6 percent. A place where banks are adding branches and holding onto their deposits. That place exists. Even in the middle of a global recession, Ghana is doing great. The African nation has enjoyed more or less unbroken growth since the 1980s, propped up by gold and cocoa exports and now, oil. BBC Chief Economics Correspondent Hugh Pym has just returned to London from a reporting trip there and he joins us now.

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The Takeaway

As Global Stock Markets Rise, So Do Hopes

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

Global stock markets have recorded some strong gains in April with the main indices in New York, London and Tokyo rising by between seven and nine percent as investors responded to signs that the economic situation might be stabilizing. Is this the light at the end of the tunnel for the world's economies? Here to talk us through what these figures mean is the BBC's economics and business correspondent Andrew Walker.

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The Takeaway

Round two on the Kyoto Protocol

Monday, April 27, 2009

The beleaguered Kyoto Protocol, enacted in 1992 to limit global greenhouse gas emissions, but was never ratified by the United States, is back up for negotiations this year. Will the U.S. be a real partner to the cap-and-trade agreement? In advance of the new Kyoto discussions, President Obama is meeting with the representatives of 17 governments at the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate in Washington D.C. The governments will be looking for indications of how others will navigate the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. For more The Takeaway turns to Andrew Revkin, New York Times environmental reporter.

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