Streams

Germany

WNYC News

The Art and Films of Germany's Enfant Terrible

Sunday, March 30, 2014

The life's work of an artist who once invited all of Germany's unemployed people to swim in a lake in Austria, where the chancellor was vacationing, is now on display at MoMA PS1.

The late Christoph Schlingensief dabbled in almost everything, from film and television shows to opera and ...

Comment

The Takeaway

President Obama Apologizes to French and German Leaders Over Surveillance Concerns

Thursday, October 24, 2013

After German Chancellor Angela Merkel received intelligence from her government that her phone was under surveillance, President Obama called Chancellor Merkel and reassured her that her phone was not being tapped. That conversation came just a few days after he had to offer similar reassurances to French President François Hollande. David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for our partner The New York Times, joins the Takeaway to discuss this latest diplomatic riff.

Comments [5]

On The Media

Global Media Reaction to the Shutdown

Friday, October 04, 2013

In the US the media have almost universally glommed on to the “blame game” narrative of the government shutdown. Reaction from around the world has been most diverse. Aviva Shen of the progressive website ThinkProgress speaks with Bob about reactions from around the globe. 

John Zorn - The Dream Machine

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Can Germany Lead the EU to a Prosperous Future?

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Timothy Garton Ash discusses the new German question: Can Europe’s most powerful country lead the way in building both a sustainable, internationally competitive Eurozone and a strong, internationally credible European Union? He explores the question and looks for answers in his article “The New German Question” in August 15 issue of the New York Review of Books.

Comments [4]

Operavore

Exclusive Preview: New Wagner Museum Opens in Germany

Friday, January 11, 2013

A new museum dedicated to Richard Wagner opens this weekend near Dresden. Located in a former hunting lodge, it opens as the world gets ready to mark his 200th anniversary, reports Fred Plotkin.

Read More

Comments [17]

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

William L. Shirer on Nazi Germany After 'The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich'

Monday, December 24, 2012

WNYC

Though it is already two decades after the start of World War II, the shadow of Nazi Germany still looms large over this 1960 talk given by journalist and historian William L. Shirer at a Books and Authors Luncheon. 

Read More

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

German Soldiers in WWII

Friday, October 12, 2012

Sönke Neitzel, Professor of International History, London School of Economics, discusses his investigations into the mind-set of the German fighting man during World War II. Soldaten: On Fighting, Killing, and Dying, written with social psychologist Harald Welzer, is based on declassified transcripts of covert recordings taken within the confines of the holding cells, bedrooms, and camps that housed the German POWs, providing a view of the mentality of the soldiers in the Wehrmacht, the Luftwaffe, the German navy.

Comments [16]

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Günter Grass on American Vagaries: Boxing, Dancing, and Creating Art

Friday, October 05, 2012

WNYC

In May 1965, the Overseas Press Club hosted the German novelist Günter Grass, who had arrived in New York to teach a seminar at Columbia University. 

Read More

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Greece vs. Germany On Field and Off

Friday, June 22, 2012

In the Euro Cup soccer tournament today, Greece plays Germany in a big quarterfinal matchup. The game takes place in the context of tensions between the two countries over the European debt crisis. Martin Rauchbauer, Director of Deutsches Haus at NYU and Dimitris Filippidis, program director at Hellas FM discuss what's at stake in the game, what's at stake in their economies, and the ties between the two countries.

Greek-Americans, German-Americans -- are you watching today's match? What do you make of the state of relations between the two countries, and will the game help or hurt? The phones are open! 212-433-9692 or comment below.

Comments [6]

On The Media

Germany Publishes "Mein Kampf"

Friday, May 18, 2012

On January 1, 2016 one of the most infamous books of the 20th century, Mein Kampf, will go into the public domain and will be published in Germany for the first time in 70 years. German media professor Nikolaus Peifer explains to Bob how Germans are trying to manage and contextualize the book’s release in order to minimalize its impact.

Comments [4]

Transportation Nation

I'm on a @#&! Tram

Thursday, May 03, 2012

When traveling I like to use public transit as much as possible, and Leipzig's tram system does not disappoint.

A tram arrives in Leipzig (photo by Kate Hinds)

I couldn't help but think of the semi-profane Saturday Night Live digital short "I'm on a Boat" with a group of overenthusiastic guys parading around in costumes rapping about how hot it is that they're on a yacht. I avoided both the rapping and the regatta wear, but I found myself almost unreasonably happy to be riding the tram. It's quick, it's clean, and it's predictable: monitors on the platform tell you exactly when the next tram will arrive.

First, to ride: you buy your ticket either on the platform -- or, prepare to be shocked, New Yorkers -- on the actual tram itself. (How many times have you wished for a MetroCard machine inside the turnstile?)

A ticket machine on a tram (photo by Kate Hinds)

Once on the tram, you validate your ticket. There are no turnstiles or barriers to entry -- it basically works on the honor system. So why pay at all? Because Germany has roaming undercover ticket police who will board a tram and call out "Fahrkarten, Fahrausweise, bitte," at which point everyone is obligated to hold up their validated tickets. If you fail to show one, the fine is somewhere in the 30 to €50 range. According to a Berliner I spoke to, the Fahrkartenkontrolleur are not amused by your excuses.

Note too in the following picture --on the top center -- you'll see a pair of television monitors. These are on every tram car I rode on. The one on the right runs ads. The one on the left provides a rolling, visual station stop list.

(photo by Kate Hinds)

The only unnerving thing about trams, at least if you're used to city subway systems, is that since their tracks are laid into the street, you must often cross them. OF COURSE THE TRACKS ARE NOT ELECTRIFIED. But a healthy respect for the third rail is part of my DNA and I couldn't bring myself to actually step ON a rail, choosing instead to advertise my out-of-townness by casually hopping over them.

(photo by Kate Hinds)

And because they run on the street, they have their own traffic lights.

Tram traffic light (photo by Kate Hinds)

I'm sure the average German commuter is jaded. But as a transit tourist, the tram was a trip.

The 16 Tram in Leipzig (photo by Kate Hinds)

 

 

Read More

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Hitlerland

Thursday, May 03, 2012

Andrew Nagorski discusses Hitler’s rise to power and Nazi Germany as seen through the eyes of Americans—diplomats, military, expats, visiting authors, Olympic athletes—who lived and worked there and watched it happen. Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power offers surprising twists and a fresh perspective on this era.

Comments [9]

The Takeaway

Mystery Donor Leaves Envelopes of Money in German Town

Monday, March 05, 2012

A small town in Germany has found that a mysterious person is leaving envelops filled with money around in an overwhelming display of generosity. Envelopes stuffed with 10,000 Euros, or about $13,000, have been found recently in the town of Braunschweig. Steve Evans of our partner the BBC reports from the scene of a generosity mystery.

Comment

The Takeaway

Pact Redefines Sovereignty for European Union

Friday, December 09, 2011

A new treaty agreed to in the early hours of Friday by 23 European Union countries, including all 17 euro zone states, may be the most direct discussion of what constitutes sovereignty since the creation of the United Nations. The intergovernmental pact is a major step toward closer integration for the 17 countries that use the euro as currency, as well as the six that hope to join in the future. British Prime Minister David Cameron vetoed a plan by France and Germany to make changes to the EU treaties that would affect all 27 EU nations, saying the deal was not in the U.K.'s interests.

Comment

The Takeaway

UK Vetoes EU Treaty

Friday, December 09, 2011

Twenty-three European Union countries, including all 17 that use the euro, agreed to an intergovernmental treaty that dictates strict tax and budget rules early Friday. The measure fell short of Germany and France's goal to get all 27 EU nations to back changes to the union's treaties after objections from Britain. Prime Minister David Cameron had sought exemptions for the U.K.'s financial sector. The fiscal compact, which penalizes members for breaking deficit rules, was welcomed by Mario Draghi, the new head of the European Central Bank.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Meeting in Bonn, Germany on the Future of Afghanistan

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

Almost 1,000 delegates from Afghanistan, NATO, and neighboring countries met in Bonn, Germany to discuss the future of Afghanistan. The talks happened in the context of the planned withdrawal of foreign troops from Afghanistan by 2014. The meeting had a sense of deja vu; 10 years ago, in this same city, in the same hotel, Afghan leaders met to discuss the future of Afghanistan. Back then, it was just months after the 9/11 attacks, the American-led invasion of Afghanistan, and the fall of the Taliban. 

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Dim Hopes for Afghanistan at Bonn Meeting

Monday, December 05, 2011

A crucial international conference on Afghanistan’s future began Monday in Bonn, Germany. Delegates from 100 nations are attempting to chart a long term course for the war-torn country, after international troops leave in 2014. But neighboring Pakistan, crucial to Afghanistan’s security, is boycotting the conference, following a NATO attack killed 24 Pakistani soldiers.

Comment

The Takeaway

Euro Zone Leaders Meet

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti is to meet Thursday with his German and French counterparts to discuss euro zone issues. On Wednesday, Germany attempted to raise €6 billion in 10 year bonds, but only sold €3.6 billion. Louise Cooper, markets analyst for BGC Partners in London, has the latest.

Comment

The Takeaway

Berlin: 'Poor But Sexy,' Detroit: 'Empty But Sexy'

Wednesday, October 05, 2011

WDET's Martina Guzman spent six weeks in the German city of Berlin, exploring a long-recognized but underreported connection between that former manufacturing giant and the Motor City. In this post, which you can hear from the radio here, she gives a first-person account of visiting Berlin and talking with several people that recognize the connection between the two cities, especially their diminished but still "sexy" industrial prowess. 

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

Industry, Iconography, and Decline: Detroit and Berlin

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

Two cities, both alike in industry: Detroit, U.S.A. and Berlin, Germany. In a recent series for WDET, Martina Guzman explored the similarities and differences between the two iconic hubs of industry that came into their own in the 20th century. 

Read More

Comment