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Geology

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Science of Studying Eruptions

Friday, January 09, 2015

More than 50 people died at a recent volcanic eruption in Japan. Iceland continues to experience its largest volcanic event in centuries. How do we predict which spot will pop next?

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Freakonomics Radio

Outsiders by Design

Thursday, September 18, 2014

What does it mean to pursue something that everyone else thinks is nuts? And what does it take to succeed?

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PRI's The World

Iceland's largest volcano might blow its stack

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Scientists say a rash of small earthquakes suggest that Iceland's largest volcano is about to blow. That could mean trouble for trans-Atlantic travelers but likely would be no big deal for local — and might even lead to a tourism boom.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Is Stonehenge a Giant Instrument?

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Theories abound about the purpose of Stonehenge, and now there's a new hypothesis: The rocks making up the structure may have been used because of how they sound.

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Radiolab

Is Planet Earth Under New Management?

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

A hundred million years from now, when we're all dead and gone, a team of geologists will be digging in a field somewhere ...

Robert Krulwich/NPR

... and they will discover, buried in the rocks below, a thin layer of sediment — very thin, ...

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On Being

Ursula King, Andrew Revkin, and David Sloan Wilson — Teilhard de Chardin's "Planetary Mind" and Our Spiritual Evolution [remix]

Thursday, January 23, 2014

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On Being

[Unedited] David Sloan Wilson with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 23, 2014

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On Being

[Unedited] Andrew Revkin with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 23, 2014

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On Being

[Unedited] Ursula King with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 23, 2014

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Radiolab

A Most Delightful Map

Friday, September 13, 2013

What I'm going to say sounds ridiculous, but once upon a time it wasn't ridiculous at all. You could wake up one morning in North America and decide to walk to Morocco, have breakfast, and a few hours later, there you are — in Africa. No sweat. Or wander from Australia into Bangladesh. Not a problem. Let me show you how.

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On Being

David Montgomery — Reading the Rocks: Flood Stories and Deep Time

Thursday, August 01, 2013

David Montgomery reads rocks for a living, and he reveals the fascinating interplay between sacred stories and the stories landscapes proclaim across the ages. He set out to debunk Noah’s Flood, and instead found a richer and more interesting history.

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On Being

[Unedited] David Montgomery with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 01, 2013

David Montgomery reads rocks for a living, and he reveals the fascinating interplay between sacred stories and the stories landscapes proclaim across the ages. He set out to debunk Noah’s Flood, and instead found a richer and more interesting history.

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Radiolab

Rocked by Doubt

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

In 2010, Lulu Miller was biking across the country, taking some time to clear her head for a new phase of life. And somewhere in Nevada, she ran into a guy named Jeff Viniard who was on a similar journey. They shared the road for two weeks, pedaling hundreds of ...

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Radiolab

Are You Sure?

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Stories about walking the tightrope between doubt and certainty.

 

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Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: Strange-Looking Tombstone Tells Of Moving Ice, Ancient Climates And A Restless Mind

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

NPR

It's a tombstone like no other. A rough, clumpy hunk of granite, carried across Europe on a sea of ice, dumped in a valley, shipped across the Atlantic, lugged to Massachusetts — all to honor a restless man.

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The Takeaway

Space News: For the History Books or the Front Pages?

Tuesday, December 04, 2012

Anticipation began building two weeks ago, after NPR quoted Mars rover Curiosity mission chief scientist John Grotzinger as saying that the rover had recently gathered data "for the history books." Was the anticipation worth it? Is there really new information that will go down in history? Denton Ebel knows a lot about the solar system, meteorites and outer space in general. He’s chair of the American Museum of Natural History’s Division of Physical Sciences.

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Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: Obama's Secret Weapon in the South - Small, Dead, but Still Kickin'

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

NPR

Robert goes way, way, way back in time for some political insights...and finds a surprising factor: plankton. Take a look at how geology makes a mark on political maps of the Deep South.

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The Takeaway

After the Quake: Aftershocks

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

We’ve heard the reports and told the stories of Japan, how it’s facing its worst crisis since World War II, about a death toll in the tens of thousands, the massive destruction of entire cities, and continuing threats of nuclear meltdown. Now, here’s more terrifying news: The threat of earthquakes hasn’t gone away — it has increased. Thomas Jordan is the Director of the Southern California Earthquake Center. And his work shows that Japan is under an increased threat for aftershocks. He appears in a new NOVA special "Japan's Killer Quake," which premiers tonight on PBS. Collum Macrae is one of the producers of the documentary.

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The Takeaway

Tsunami Devastates Japan

Friday, March 11, 2011

An 8.8 magnitude struck 80 miles off of Japan's coast early this morning. It triggered a massive tsunami that devastated the northern coast soon after, giving little time for warning or evacuation. Disaster officials say that at least 32 people have been killed. A tsunami warning has been issued across the Pacific Ocean. The New York Times' Kevin Drew reports on the event from Hong Kong.

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The Takeaway

Finding the 'Vast Ocean of a Million Stories' in the Atlantic

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Try to imagine the world two hundred million years ago, when the earth's original landmass began to break apart into the continents that we know today. That moment made way for the mighty Atlantic ocean. 

Author, geologist and journalist Simon Winchester fell in love with the Atlantic when he made his first trans-Atlantic voyage in the early 1960s. That voyage inspired his latest book: "Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms,and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories."

 

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