Streams

 

Geography

99% Invisible

115- Cow Tunnels

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

The westernmost part of Manhattan, between 34th and 39th street, is pretty industrial. There’s a bus depot, a ferry terminal, and a steady stream of cars. But in the late 19th early 20th centuries, this was cow country.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Is Your Neighborhood Keeping You Poor?

Monday, May 12, 2014

We encourage people from poor neighborhoods to "escape" poverty, but at the same time want them stick around and "give back."

Comments [31]

The Takeaway

A Worldwide View of Storm Surges In One Map

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

There are all sorts of humanitarian and relief efforts that happen in hard-hit countries after disasters like Typhoon Haiyan. But not all disasters have equally damaging effects. The storm surge from Typhoon Haiyan reached as high as 23 feet and in some places sea water churned up by the storm far exceeded that. James K. Mitchell, a professor of geography at Rutgers University, joins The Takeaway to explain how storm surge makes natural disasters riskier.

Comment

Radiolab

Seasons of Smell

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Fall: cinnamon. Winter: pine. Spring: lilacs. Each season smells different, right? Well, sorta.

Read More

Comments [6]

Radiolab

A Most Delightful Map

Friday, September 13, 2013

What I'm going to say sounds ridiculous, but once upon a time it wasn't ridiculous at all. You could wake up one morning in North America and decide to walk to Morocco, have breakfast, and a few hours later, there you are — in Africa. No sweat. Or wander from Australia into Bangladesh. Not a problem. Let me show you how.

Read More

Comments [6]

The Brian Lehrer Show

How Where You Live Affects What You Earn

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Nathaniel Hendren, assistant professor of economics at Harvard University, discusses the study he co-authored that demonstrates geographic location's relationship with upward mobility.

Comments [1]

Micropolis

Micropolis: Mapping Love, Hate & Loss in Manhattan

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

What's with this city, that we endlessly dissect it, glorify it, wonder how exactly we fit into it?

Read More

Comments [3]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Adventures of a Bipolar Cartographer

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Sascha Altman Dubrul, writer, activist, musician, and author of Maps to The Other Side: the Adventures of A Bipolar Cartographer, discusses his latest book, a memoir of his experiences with bipolar disorder and his activism.

Comments [21]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Jared Diamond: Learning From The Past

Monday, January 07, 2013

This interview originally aired live on January 7, 2013. An edited version was re-aired on August 9, 2013 as part of a special episode of The Brian Lehrer Show. 

Jared Diamond, professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles, discusses his latest book, The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn From Traditional Societies?, and talks about how we can learn from the differences between modern life and traditional societies that still exist today.

→ EVENT: An Evening with Jared Diamond. Monday, January 07, 2013 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. at the New School Tishman Auditorium, Alvin Johnson/J. M. Kaplan Hall, 66 West 12th Street. (Sold Out, but information about no-show seating here.)

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Revenge of Geography

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Robert D. Kaplan examines global upheavals, past and present, through the lens of geography and looks at what lies ahead for continents and countries around the world. In The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells Us About Coming Conflicts and the Battle Against Fate  he traces the history of the world’s hot spots by examining their climates, topographies, and proximities to other conflicts. Kaplan then applies the lessons learned to the present crises in Europe, Russia, China, the Indian subcontinent, Turkey, Iran, and the Arab Middle East.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Atlantic Ocean

Monday, January 03, 2011

Simon Winchester gives an account of the history, geography, science, and cultural influence of the Atlantic Ocean.  Atlantic: The Biography of an Ocean tells the story of this great body of water and it’s connection to the Vikings, the Irish, the Chinese, Christopher Columbus, the Portuguese and Spanish.

Comments [6]

Micropolis

A Rat Island, But Alas, No Rats

Thursday, December 02, 2010

I was heartened to hear that our city has a Rat Island -- near City Island, off the Bronx -- but frankly, a bit disappointed that it was never home to a huge, writhing colony of untameable super-rodents. From Ephemeral New York (via MAS):

Purchased from Native Americans in 1654 by the Pell family, the island’s name supposedly stems from the inmates then jailed on Hart Island. When inmates—who were nicknamed rats—escaped, they swam to Rat Island first before making a go at reaching City Island.

By the 1800s, it was the location of the “Pelham Pesthouse,” a yellow fever hospital that quarantined 40 people.

Last year, the 2.5 acre island was up for sale, for $300,000. Not sure what became of that, although it's never too late to build that rodent colony and amusement park. I actually know the parks commissioner, fyi.

Read More

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Indian Ocean and American Power

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Robert Kaplan, senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security and a national correspondent for The Atlantic, and author of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and the Future of American Power, discusses the future of American power in the Indian Ocean region.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Patchwork Nation’s Immigration Nation: America en Español

Friday, October 17, 2008

The Takeaway continues its ongoing look at America as a patchwork nation, rather than a collection of red and blue states. This time, we focus on the "Immigration Nation." It's a group of 12 million people in 144 counties that have large Hispanic populations.

Comment

The Takeaway

Patchwork Nation: Race and education issues permeate “Minority Central”

Thursday, October 09, 2008

The Takeaway continues its ongoing look at America as a "patchwork" nation rather than a collection of red and blue states. This time, we focus on “Minority Central,” a group of 408 counties that are home to large pockets of black and Native American voters.

Comment

The Takeaway

Patchwork Nation: Affluent "Monied 'Burbs" feeling financial pains too

Monday, October 06, 2008

In our ongoing look at the economy, we turn to Dante Chinni of The Christian Science Monitor's Patchwork Nation project, which uses demographic information to look at America beyond state lines. No more red state or blue state. Chinni tells The Takeaway about the affluent way of life at risk in the "Monied 'Burbs."

Comment

The Takeaway

Patchwork Nation: Economic jitters, Emptying Nests and Service Worker Centers

Friday, September 26, 2008

In our ongoing look at the economy, we turn to our friend Dante Chinni of the Christian Science Monitor's Patchwork Nation project. The project uses demographic information to look at America beyond blue-and-red state dichotomies. What does financial pain feel like on a local level? Chinni talks with The Takeaway about what he's found in two communities on the frontlines of economic downturn, "Emptying Nests” and "Service Worker Centers."

Comment

The Takeaway

Global map shows prevalence of multiple sclerosis in North America and Europe

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Multiple sclerosis, once considered a disease that affected mainly those in Europe and North America, is actually a global concern. The Atlas of MS, the most comprehensive MS research study ever undertaken, was launched this week. For a look at the latest findings, The Takeaway checks in with the man who spearheaded this three-year endeavor.

Comment

The Takeaway

Patchwork Nation: Evangelical Epicenters and "The Sarah Palin Effect"

Monday, September 08, 2008

Forget Red State - Blue State politics. But don't forget that all politics is local. The Christian Science Monitor's Patchwork Nation project is redefining political geography based on social and economic data, and in the process is clarifying the issues that will matter to Americans come November. Project leader Dante Chinni returns to The Takeaway to talk about another Patchwork Nation community, "Evangelical Epicenters."

Comment

The Takeaway

Russia, China talk while U.S. condemns decision to recognize breakaway regions

Thursday, August 28, 2008

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev is holding talks today with his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao in Tajikistan. Medvedev says China and four Central Asian republics have expressed understanding for Russia's actions in Georgia. Meanwhile, seven Western countries, including the United States, issued a joint statement condemning Russia’s decision to recognize Georgia's breakaway regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.

Comment