Streams

 

Genetics

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Frontiers in Genetics, 1949

Wednesday, November 09, 2011

This week's Studio 360, "Making Better People," takes a look at man's preoccupation with improving man. Featuring interviews with Greg Stock, author of Redesigning Humans: Our Inevitable Genetic Future, and others, the program considers how we might better nature through engineering. Meanwhile, in the Archives we found a WNYC program exploring the same topic ...almost exactly sixty-two years earlier.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

My Beautiful Genome

Monday, October 31, 2011

Science writer Lone Frank talks about using her own DNA to examine the new science of consumer-led genomics. In My Beautiful Genome she looks at how this science is used, how important it is for our health, and the consequences of biological fortune-telling.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Sibling Effect

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Time science writer, Jeffrey Kluger looks at the bonds between siblings. In The Sibling Effect: What the Bonds Among Brothers and Sisters Reveal about Us, Kluger explores the complex world of siblings in a way that is equal parts science, psychology, sociology, and memoir. Based on new and emerging research, it looks at birth order, twin studies, genetic encoding of behavioral traits, emotional disorders and their effects on-and effects from-sibling relationships.

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Radiolab

REBROADCAST: Detective Stories

Monday, July 11, 2011

We're celebrating summer with a classic episode of Radiolab--full of mystery, intrigue...and a goat standing on a cow. We haven't actually tried listening to it around a campfire, but we're betting it would totally work. See you in two weeks with a new short!

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Epigenetics

Monday, July 11, 2011

Richard Francis discusses the new scientific field of epigenetics, the study of how stress in the environment can impact an individual's physiology so deeply that those biological scars actually can be inherited by the next generations. In Epigenetics: The Ultimate Mystery of Inheritance he explains why researchers believe that epigenetics holds the key to understanding obesity, cancer, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, autism, and diabetes.

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The Takeaway

Caring for Loved Ones with Alzheimer's

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

One in eight people over age 65 suffers from Alzheimer's disease. Most patients develop late-onset Alzheimer's. Scientists have found a predisposing genetic risk factor for this type of the disease, and while they have yet to discover a direct genetic link, researchers have isolated the early-onset Alzheimer’s gene. Early-onset Alzheimer's is rare, affecting only five percent of Alzheimer’s patients. But it can strike as early as 30, with devastating consequences for the patient and their families. Many families are unprepared for the difficult decisions caregivers face when their loved ones are diagnosed with early- or late-onset Alzheimer's. 


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The Takeaway

Gay, Straight, and the Reasons Why

Friday, October 22, 2010

What tendencies are we born with? What is a choice? And does it make you feel better or worse to know that certain things – ranging from weight to our intelligence — are one or the other?

Think, for example of sexual orientation. A lot of people have a lot invested in whether we’re born gay or whether it’s a choice. Is it one or the other? Does it even matter?

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The Takeaway

Agenda: Shrimping, Housing, Deficits

Monday, August 16, 2010

We look ahead at this week in news. It's the official beginning of shrimping season in Louisiana; Russia's grain embargo has just taken effect; the Obama administration tries to figure out how to approach mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac; a judge's ruling effectively bans planting genetically modified sugar beets; and the Congressional Budget Office will release its budget outlook.

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The Takeaway

Exploring the Science and Ethics Behind the First Man-Made Cell

Friday, May 21, 2010

A team of scientists have successfully developed new living bacteria from non-living parts, which they’re calling the first “synthetic cell.”

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Research Report

Thursday, April 01, 2010

Jeremy Singer-Vine, who writes the Research Report for the Wall Street Journal, talks about the most interesting recent medical research and how it can be used to inform and improve our health. He covers myriad topics—from why some people sneeze when they look at the sun comes out ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Rebecca Skloot discusses the life and legacy of Henrietta Lacks, a poor Southern tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. Her book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks tells the story of the Lacks family, the dark history of experimentation on ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Green Choices

Thursday, March 18, 2010

On today’s show, we’ll discuss the impact each of us can have on the health of the planet by doing small positive things. Then, we’ll learn about the life of Henrietta Lacks, who died of cancer in 1951, but whose cells were kept alive and have changed the course of ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Chasing Miracles

Monday, February 08, 2010

When John Crowley and his wife Aileen learned that their two youngest children had a rare genetic disorder called Pompe disease, he left his corporate job to help co-found a start-up biotech company focused exclusively on developing a treatment for the disease. His book Chasing Miracles: The Crowley Family ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fight or Flight

Monday, February 08, 2010

Pulitzer Prize-winning military correspondent Thomas E. Ricks gives us an update on what's happening in Iraq. Then, saxophonist David Sanborn discusses his new album, “Only Everything.” The new Harrison Ford film “Extraordinary Measures” was inspired by a true story, and we’ll talk to John Crowley about his experience trying to ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Other Brain

Friday, January 22, 2010

Neuroscientist Douglas Field, explains how glia, which make up approximately 85 percent of the cells in the brain, work. In The Other Brain: From Dementia to Schizophrenia, How New Discoveries about the Brain Are Revolutionizing Medicine and Science, he explains recent discoveries in glia research and looks at what ...

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Orchid Hypothesis

Monday, November 23, 2009

People get passionate about their handheld devices. WNYC staffers Jim Colgan, a producer for The Takeaway, and Mark Phillips, a producer with On the Media, debate the virtues of their machines. Atlantic Magazine contributor David Dobbs talks about the orchid hypothesis and why genetic vulnerabilities might actually be genetic benefits ...

The Takeaway

DNA Swapping May Cloud Evidence

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

In a newly-released paper in the journal Forensic Science International: Genetics, scientists in Tel Aviv, Israel, describe how they have found a process to fabricate DNA. The process involved removing DNA from a woman’s blood sample and adding DNA from a different person. The process was so easy, they say, that any biology undergraduate has the tools to engineer his or her own crime scene.  (DNA evidence left at crime scenes has been considered nearly incontrovertible in the past; this process raises questions about its reliability going forward.) 

We talk to Timothy Bestor, a professor of genetics and development at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and Tania Simoncelli, a science advisor at the American Civil Liberties Union.

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WNYC News

Groups Call for Making Attacks on Home a Hate Crime

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Lawmakers and homeless advocates are pushing for legislation that would make attacks against the homeless, a hate crime. The recommendation for the bill comes on the heels of a recent study from the National Coalition for the Homeless. It says there's an uptick in violence ...

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WNYC News

Study: Air Pollution May Lower IQ

Monday, July 20, 2009

A study measuring the effects of air pollution on pregnant mothers suggests their children might have slightly lower IQ’s. Researchers placed air monitors on the mothers during pregnancy, tracked the children for five years, and then measured their IQ’s. Doctor Frederica Perera says those in ...

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WNYC News

Natural History Museum Stores Endangered Species Tissues

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Tissue samples from endangered species will now be stored at the Museum of Natural History, under a new agreement with the U.S. Parks Service. The museum already freezes its own samples taken from whales, butterflies, and other creatures in seven cryovats. They look like giant, ...

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