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Gadhafi Captured

The Takeaway

NATO Ends Libya Mission

Tuesday, November 01, 2011

After four decades of tyrannical rule, and a bloody seven month uprising with the assistance of the international community, a new chapter begins in Libya today. NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen announced the end of the alliance's seven month mission in Libya on Monday. Shortly thereafter, Libya's National Transitional Council elected a new interim prime minister.

That's NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen yeseterday, announcing the end of the alliance's seven month mission in Libya. The mission saw NATO provide assistance to the rebel uprising that eventually led to the overthrow and killing of dictator Moammar Gadhafi. The destruction yesterday of the deposed Libyan leader’s Tripoli home provided a fitting backdrop to the end of the military.
Gadhafi was captured and killed in his hometown of Sirte less than two weeks ago, officially bringing an end to his brutal 42 year rule of the country. But what will his ultimate legacy on the country be? And what’s next for Libya?
Joining us now to answer those questions is Jon Lee Anderson. He’s a staff writer at The New Yorker and he’s got an article in this week’s edition of the magazine “King of Kings: The Last Days Of Muammar Qaddafi”.

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The Takeaway

American Doctor Describes Libya's Medical Infrastructure Before and After Gadhafi

Monday, October 31, 2011

It's been a week and a half since rebels killed Muammar Gadhafi, after taking his hometown of Sirte. Libya is now a country in the midst of healing old wounds and trying to rebuild a nation. Dr. Catherine Mullaly, an anesthesiologist with Massachusetts General Hospital, was working in Qasr Ahmed Hospital in Misrata the day Gadhafi was captured and killed. She’s just returned from a six week assignment there with Médecins Sans Frontières, and shares what she saw in the days after Gadhafi's death.

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The Takeaway

Gadhafi Buried in Secret Location at Dawn

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Libyan officials confirmed on Tuesday that the body of Col. Moammar Gadhafi, his son Muatassim, and former Defense Minister Abu Bakr Younis were buried at dawn in a secret location. Questions over how and when to dispose of the former dictator's body created a challenge for Libya's transitional government. Islamic law dictates that burial should happen within a day after death, but Libya's National Transitional Council took several days to decided how to act. Katya Adler, correspondent for the BBC, reports on the latest from Tripoli.

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The Takeaway

The Death of Gadhafi and The Arab Spring

Friday, October 21, 2011

It’s been ten months since the series of revolutions and protests known as the Arab Spring sprung out across the region. It began in Tunis, the capital of Tunisia. Tunisians go to the polls this Sunday in the first democratic elections of the Arab Spring. How will the developments in Libya may affect the entire region, particularly the elections in Tunis and then Egypt?

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The Takeaway

Libyan Student Stuck in Diplomatic Limbo

Friday, October 21, 2011

Reactions to the death of Moammar Gadhafi continue to pour in from Libya and across the U.S. Mohamed Gibril is a student at Michigan State University. He and other Libyan students were sent to the U.S. to study under a Libyan government program for diplomatic training before the uprising against the Gadhafi regime. Since then his visa has run out and he's been unable to return safely. He and his fellow students are currently in limbo due to the turmoil in their country. Assia Bashir Amry is the daughter of exiled Libyan revolutionary ElHajj Sabr, a revolutionary who did not live to see Gadhafi's ouster. She talks about what feelings Gadhafi's death has brought up for her.

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The Takeaway

Libya Celebrates Gadhafi's Death; World Asks Questions About His Demise

Friday, October 21, 2011

In the 24 hours since the world have gotten news of Col. Moammar Gadhafi's death, the streets of Libya have been overwhelmed with celebrations. As joyous Libyans express their relief that Gadhafi's brutal reign has finally come to an end, international observers are raising questions over the way the dictator died. Graphic photographs of Gadhafi's corpse and a mobile phone video of what appears to be his final moments have lead the Human Rights commissioner at the United Nations to call for an investigation into his death.

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The Takeaway

Building a Democratic Libya After Dictatorship

Friday, October 21, 2011

The death of Moammar Gadhafi and the capture of Sirte brings to close a prolonged struggle between the Gadhafi regime and Libya's pro-democracy rebels, ending an years of conflict and clearing the way for a new era of rebuilding, with challenges of its own. With the fall of a ruler who has been in power for more than four decades, Libya in many ways will be starting from scratch. Mike Newton, an international law professor at Vanderbilt University Law School, has been acting as a legal adviser to the Libyan rebels. Former Assistant Secretary of Defense Larry Korb is a fellow at the Center for American Progress. They both weigh in on Libya's future.

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The Takeaway

Matthew VanDyke: An American Fighter in Post-Gadhafi Libya

Friday, October 21, 2011

Matthew VanDyke is an American who traveled to Libya when the war broke out. He planned to travel, write, and help friends in the area. But his plan went terribly wrong in March when he was captured by Gadhafi loyalists and held in solitary confinement for six months. He finally escaped captivity in August, but has stayed on in Libya out of a sense of loyalty to the other men he was imprisoned with, apparently joining the NTC fighters. Matthew's mother Sharon VanDyke talks about what the future holds for her son, now that Moammar Gadhafi has been killed.

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The Takeaway

Libyan-American Rapper Khaled M. Reacts to Gadhafi's Death

Friday, October 21, 2011

Libyan-Americans are celebrating the death of former dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Khaled M. is a 26-year-old Libyan-American rapper from Chicago. In his own way Khaled has followed in his parents footsteps. They spent most of their lives fighting the Gadhafi regime through community organizing and student activism. His father, Mohamed Ahmed, was a political prisoner from 1972 to 1977 after leading student groups against Gadhafi.

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The Takeaway

Libya Moves Forward After Gadhafi

Friday, October 21, 2011

The 42 year rule of Libya's Moammar Gadhafi came to a brutal end on Thursday when he was killed by National Transitional Council forces in his hometown of Sirte. As Libyans rejoice, and the world waits to see how his death will impact the region, bloody photographs of Gadhafi's corpse and a grisly video of his final moments have raised questions about his demise. Libya is on a difficult path as it forges a new government that must provide stability to a country that has gone generations without it. Some wonder how the nation will move forward in the aftermath of Gadhafi's brutal regime. Can the country peacefully transfer into a fledgling democracy? Could there be more violence on the horizon?

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The Takeaway

Moammar Gadhafi Reportedly Captured in Sirte

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Col. Moammar Gadhafi was Sirte this morning, and later killed from a gunshot to the head sustained during a gunfight between rebels and loyalists. Adbel Majid of Libya's National Transitional Council was quoted by Reuters as saying Gadhafi was wounded in both legs and was carried away by an ambulance. Earlier in the morning, NTC fighters seized Sirte, the last city loyal to Gadhafi. Gadhafi has been in hiding since Tripoli fell to rebel fighters on August 21. Bani Walid, the other remaining Gadhafi stronghold, was taken by NTC forces on Monday.

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It's A Free Country ®

The End of Gadhafi?

Thursday, October 20, 2011

The question is now – can Libya make good on the promise of the insurgency?

—  Benjamin Barberpolitical theorist and Distinguished Senior Fellow at the policy center Demos, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Nicholas Kristof on the Reported Death of Gadhafi

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Unconfirmed reports out of Libya this morning say Col. Moammar Gadhafi has died of injuries he sustained when he was captured in his birthplace of Sirte earlier in the day. Celebrations are breaking out all over the country, as jubilant Libyans rejoice over the dawn of a new country, and the alleged death of a brutal leader. Gadhafi was hated by many Libyans, says New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, who has followed Libya for many years. Kristof looks back at the four decades of Gadhafi's rule.

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The Takeaway

The Apparent Final Chapter of the Gadhafi Story

Thursday, October 20, 2011

"I will confirm that Gadhafi is dead and also his second man in the army, Abu Bakr Younus Jabr," Abdullah Kenshil, a spokesman for Libya's National Transitional Council, told The Takeaway. "This is definitely confirmed by our commander and our miltary council in Tripoli, so he is killed." Gadhafi was killed this morning in his birthplace of Sirte as forces of the NTC swept the city. His death has not been confirmed outside of the NTC.

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The Takeaway

NTC Spokesman: 'I Will Confirm That Gadhafi is Dead'

Thursday, October 20, 2011

"I will confirm that Gadhafi is dead and also his second man in the army, Abu Bakr Younus Jabr," Abdullah Kenshil told The Takeaway. "This is definitely confirmed by our commander and our miltary council in Tripoli, so he is killed." Kenshil was the chief negotiator for Libya's National Transitional Council's forces in Bani Walid. He and Sarah, a resident of Tripoli, react to Gadhafi's death.

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The Takeaway

The Foreign Policy Implications of Gadhafi's Death

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Col. Moammar Gadhafi was killed this morning in his birthplace of Sirte as forces of the National Transitional Council swept the city, according to the leader of the Tripoli military council. The reports have not been confirmed outside of the NTC. Martin Indyk, former U.S ambassador to Israel, and director of the Foreign Policy Institute at the Brookings Institution, comments on how Gadhafi's reported death will shake up international relations in the region.

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The Takeaway

The Son of a Libyan Dissident on Gadhafi's Death

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Ahmed Almegaryaf's father was a Libyan political dissident opposed to Moammar Gadhafi. The elder Almegaryaf was kidnapped in Egypt in 1990, and is thought to have been held in a prison in Libya ever since. His children last heard from their father in a letter in 1993. The Takeaway spoke to Ahmed's brother, Bashir in August after Tripoli fell to the rebels. Ahmed reacts to the reported death of Col. Moammar Gadhafi, and shares his hopes for a new Libya.

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The Takeaway

NTC: Moammar Gadhafi is Dead

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Col. Moammar Gadhafi was killed this morning in his birthplace of Sirte as forces of the National Transitional Council swept the city, according to the leader of the Tripoli military council. The reports have not been confirmed outside of the NTC. Unconfirmed reports also say his spokesman, Moussa Ibrahim, was captured, and Abu Bakr Younus Jabr, head of his military, was killed. Celebrations have erupted all over the country as Libyans rejoiced over the end of his rule. Gadhafi has been in hiding since Tripoli fell to rebel fighters on August 21.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Moammar Gadhafi Reportedly Dead, Headlines

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Col. Moammar Gadhafi has reportedly been captured and wounded. There are also unconfirmed reports from a Libyan government official that he has died from his wounds.

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The Takeaway

Celebrating Reports of Gadhafi's Death on the Road to Misrata

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Unconfirmed reports out of Libya this morning say Col. Moammar Gadhafi is dead, bringing an official end to his four decades of brutal rule. Gadhafi has been missing since Tripoli fell to rebel fighters on August 21. Ibrahim Bayu, a Libyan citizen, joins the program from the road to Mistara, where celebrations are breaking out all around him.

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