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Gadhafi

The Takeaway

Women's Rights in Libya One Year After the Revolution

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

After Ben-Ali fled Tunisia, and Mubarak ran from Egypt, the Libyan revolution began in Benghazi and then traveled east, to Tripoli. After an intense civil war bolstered by international support, Moammar Gadhafi’s 40-year reign finally ended last October in his hometown of Sirte. As Libyans celebrate the anniversary of their revolution, the state of their government is still in flux, and the role of women in Libyan civic life is particularly uncertain.

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The Takeaway

As Libya Fell, Americans Attempted to Profit Off Gadhafi

Friday, November 18, 2011

Confidential documents found in Libyan government offices show a group of Americans tried to assist Col. Moammar Gadhafi and his family flee the country for at least $10 million. The group, which called themselves the "American Action Group," also offered Gadhafi lobbying services to sway the U.S. government to support his regime after NATO became its bombing campaign. Made up of a former CIA officer, a Kansas City lawyer, a GOP operative, and a terrorism expert, the group claims their goal was to avoid a Libyan civil war, not to help Gadhafi. Scott Shane broke the news for The New York Times. He discusses the details of the story.

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The Takeaway

Journalist Clare Morgana Gillis on Her Imprisonment in Gadhafi's Libya

Monday, November 14, 2011

On April 5, freelance journalist Clare Morgana Gillis was violently captured by loyalists of Moammar Gadhafi while reporting from the front lines of the Libyan conflict. She was captured alive, along with two other journalists, when gun-wielding loyalists surrounded the group near the eastern Libyan oil town of Brega. A South African photojournalist who was with the group at the time of the capture was shot and killed in the melee.

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The Takeaway

Gadhafi's Penpal: A Jewish Florist from Brooklyn

Friday, November 04, 2011

A number of peculiar stories have emerged since the demise of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi. There was the story about his crush on former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice, which she has called "weird and a bit creepy." Rice may not have liked Gadhafi's attention, but Louis Schlamowitz, an 81-year-old Jewish florist from Brooklyn, was happy to have corresponded with him for a number of years. A hobby collector of over 6,000 autographs, Schlamowitz first wrote to Gadhafi in the late 1960s and continued to receive letters from the dictator for forty years.

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The Takeaway

American Doctor Describes Libya's Medical Infrastructure Before and After Gadhafi

Monday, October 31, 2011

It's been a week and a half since rebels killed Muammar Gadhafi, after taking his hometown of Sirte. Libya is now a country in the midst of healing old wounds and trying to rebuild a nation. Dr. Catherine Mullaly, an anesthesiologist with Massachusetts General Hospital, was working in Qasr Ahmed Hospital in Misrata the day Gadhafi was captured and killed. She’s just returned from a six week assignment there with Médecins Sans Frontières, and shares what she saw in the days after Gadhafi's death.

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It's A Free Country ®

Is There an Obama Doctrine on Foreign Policy?

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Libya was the test case for the un-Iraq. This was an effort to make the commitment at the beginning that there would be no American ground troops.

David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Libya Moves Forward After Gadhafi

Friday, October 21, 2011

The 42 year rule of Libya's Moammar Gadhafi came to a brutal end on Thursday when he was killed by National Transitional Council forces in his hometown of Sirte. As Libyans rejoice, and the world waits to see how his death will impact the region, bloody photographs of Gadhafi's corpse and a grisly video of his final moments have raised questions about his demise. Libya is on a difficult path as it forges a new government that must provide stability to a country that has gone generations without it. Some wonder how the nation will move forward in the aftermath of Gadhafi's brutal regime. Can the country peacefully transfer into a fledgling democracy? Could there be more violence on the horizon?

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It's A Free Country ®

The End of Gadhafi?

Thursday, October 20, 2011

The question is now – can Libya make good on the promise of the insurgency?

—  Benjamin Barberpolitical theorist and Distinguished Senior Fellow at the policy center Demos, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Libya: Rebels Advance on Gadhafi Loyalist Strongholds

Monday, September 19, 2011

Though Col. Moammar Gadhafi remains in hiding, two Libyan towns loyal to the deposed leader are holding out against rebel forces. Libya's interim government, the NTC, said forces had made advances Sirte, Bani Walid, and several other small towns loyal to Gadhafi. Peter Biles, correspondent for the BBC, filed this report from Bani Walid.

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The Takeaway

Gadhafi Loyalists Flee to Niger

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

A convoy of over 200 vehicles believed to be carrying loyalists to Col. Moammar Gadhafi crossed Libya's southern border into Niger on Tuesday. The loyalists are thought to be heading to Burkina Faso, which has offered the fugitive Libyan leader asylum. A spokesman for Gadhafi said he remains in Libya. Questions have arisen as to why NATO would allow the convoy to escape. Rebel negotiators are pressing loyalists in Bani Walid to surrender peacefully by Saturday.

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The Takeaway

Libyan Rebels Extend Surrender Deadline for Sirte

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

Fighters in Libya are giving loyalists in Sirte, the birthplace of Col. Moammar Gadhafi, until this weekend to surrender. Meanwhile, A convoy of over 200 vehicles believed to be carrying loyalists to Col. Moammar Gadhafi crossed Libya's southern border into Niger on Tuesday. BBC correspondent Paul Wood filed this report while on the road to Sirte.

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The Takeaway

Tripoli's Drinking Water Problem

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Today, French President Nicolas Sarkozy and British Prime Minister David Cameron are co-hosting a "friends of Libya" meeting in Paris. On the docket is how to help the National Transitional Council the future of Libya. One of the problems that will need sorting out quickly is the lack of drinking water in Tripoli. The BBC's Kevin Connolly filed this report.

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The Takeaway

An American Imprisoned in Gadhafi's Tripoli

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

It sounds like the script of a movie, but the story of how American Matthew VanDyke ended up in the hands of the Gadhafi regime is very real. VanDyke traveled to Libya to help friends living there just as the war broke out between the rebels and the loyalists. He was captured in Brega, hit over the head and awoke in a prison cell. He was placed in solitary confinement twice, for 85 and then 76 days, before essentially escaping on August 24.

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The Takeaway

Gadhafi Still Missing, Libya Moves On

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Libyan rebel leaders have rejected the prospect of having United Nations peacekeepers aid in the transition to a new government, according to top UN officials. The rebels also continue to search for Moammar Gadhafi, as Gadhafi's wife and three children fled to Algeria yesterday. The rebels are also facing growing pressure to provide basic services to the Libyan people, like water and electricity, in advance of actually organizing a transitional government.

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The Takeaway

Senator Cardin on the US Role in Libya

Friday, August 26, 2011

Yesterday the United Nations Security Council reached an agreement to release $1.5 billion in frozen Libyan assets, to help meet humanitarian needs for civilians there. The State Department is assuring the American people that money will not fall into the wrong hands. Libyan rebels are continuing their search for Moammar Gadhafi, with the help of NATO. But what will the U.S.'s role be in Libya's transition to a democracy?

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The Takeaway

What's Next for Libya?

Friday, August 26, 2011

It's been a whirlwind week in Libya. On Monday, Libyan rebels stormed into Tripoli, effectively taking over the capital city and inciting celebrations and battles with Gadhafi loyals. Gadhafi's forces were holding foreign journalists under lock and key in the Rixos hotel, but finally freed them on Wednesday, as rebels surrounded Gadhafi's compound. As the rebels continue to search for the missing leader, the Transitional National Council is preparing to govern a post-Gadhafi Libya. What’s next for Libya?

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The Takeaway

Who Controls Gadhafi's Weapons?

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Over the course of his 42 years of power in Libya, Moammar Gadhafi spent a great deal of money acquiring both chemical and nuclear weapons. The deposed dictator halted his weapons of mass destruction program after the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003, but large amounts of uranium, as well as mustard gas and other chemical agents remain in the country. With the possibility that Gadhafi's reign may soon end, many are concerned about what will come of his stockpile of deadly weapons. Who will have control over the weapons?

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The Takeaway

Libya Moves Forward After Gadhafi

Thursday, August 25, 2011

In Libya, the rebels' Transitional National Council has begun moving some of their operations from Benghazi to Tripoli. The head of the TNC announced that he plans to hold elections in eight months. While plans are under way for a post-Gadhafi Libya, the man himself remains elusive. The Council faces a tough road ahead as the country has never seen this kind of transformation before.

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The Takeaway

Inside the Mind of Moammar Gadhafi

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Over the course of his 42-year reign, Libyan ruler Moammar Gadhafi has garnered a reputation for being one of the most eccentric and unpredictable leaders on the global stage. Since assuming leadership of the country at age 27, his rule felt unshakable until the first series of uprisings in February. What makes him tick, and what could he be thinking now, as he continues to hide from rebel forces while his leadership seems to be reaching an end?

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The Takeaway

NATO's Role in Post-Gadhafi Libya

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Fighting continues today in Tripoli between rebel forces and Gadhafi government loyalists. Yesterday, the rebels stormed Gadhafi's compound, but the Libyan leader remains at large. The raid by the rebels effectively ended Gadhafi's 42-year reign. As Libya enters a period of transition, many are wondering NATO's future role in the country. NATO's involvement in the Libyan civil war began as a humanitarian intervention, but its efforts went on to play a vital role in crippling Gadhafi's army, allowing rebel forces to eventually advance into Tripoli.

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