Streams

 

Fuel

The Takeaway

Obama Proposes Drilling Along Atlantic Coast

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

The decision comes just days after the White House recommended imposing tougher restrictions on drilling in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Goodbye Prius, Hello Gas Guzzler?

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Is it true that as soon as gas prices drop people stop riding the subway and start buy new gas guzzlers? A transportation expert explains what really happens.

Comments [5]

The Takeaway

Surprising Twist: GOP May Raise Gas Tax

Friday, January 09, 2015

A few powerful GOP senators are signaling that they're open to the idea—even House Speaker John Boehner, who personally opposes raising the gas tax, hasn't ruled it out.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

U.S. Creditors Worry as Oil Prices Dive

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Most Americans are thrilled to pay less at the pump. But the truth is that declining oil prices could post serious problems for the U.S. economy.

Comment

The Takeaway

America: Kicking an Addiction to Mid East Oil?

Thursday, December 11, 2014

On Wednesday, the price of a barrel of oil fell to a five year low. For the first time in years, gas prices across the country are below $3.00 a gallon.

Comments [4]

Fishko Files

Last Tango

Thursday, July 17, 2014

In this archival edition of Fishko Files, WNYC’s Sara Fishko recalls one inflammatory  film of 1972, starring Marlon Brando, that was proclaimed a game-changer for movies.  Was it?  Here is the next Fishko Files...

Comments [2]

Transportation Nation

BREAKING: Court Upholds EPA's Emissions Rules

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

(photo by Josh Koonce via flickr)

A federal appeals court Tuesday said the Environmental Protection Agency was "unambiguously correct" in using existing federal law to limit greenhouse gases blamed for global warming.

Several industry groups -- as well as the state of Texas -- had argued that the science behind climate change was uncertain, and that the EPA lacked the legal authority to use the Clean Air Act to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from factories, power plants, and automobile tailpipes.

But the court unanimously rejected that view. "This is how science works," the judges wrote in the 82-page decision (pdf). "EPA is not required to re-prove the existence of the atom every time it approaches a scientific question."

The opinion cites not only a previous Supreme Court ruling but also Schoolhouse Rock.  (As a generation of schoolchildren knows, 'by that time, it’s very unlikely that [a bill will] become a law. It’s not easy to become a law.'")

Read the decision here.

Read More

Comment

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Tensions rise between Iran and the west and Nigeria tries to end a costly fuel subsidy

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Tensions rise between Iran and the west and Nigeria tries to end a costly fuel subsidy

Comment

The Takeaway

US Set To Become Net Exporter of Fuel

Thursday, December 01, 2011

Despite high gas prices, the U.S. is set to become a net fuel exporter for the first time in 62 years. While the U.S. is still importing 8 to 9 million barrels of crude oil a day, it is exporting a greater amount of refined fuel and petroleum products. The spike in exports is primarily driven by an increased demand for fuel worldwide combined with declining consumption here at home. But is the nation's newfound role as fuel exporter a blip on the map or a sustainable trend?

Comment

WNYC News

Financial 411: Travel Plans a Go Despite Economy

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Many Americans appear determined to go on a vacation this summer despite their anxieties about the economy. But they will have to make an extra effort to find savings, with gas prices and air fares both higher than they were last year.

Comment

The Takeaway

Pump Prices Drive Weekend Plans Off Course

Friday, May 27, 2011

As memorial day approaches, Americans are topping off their gas tanks and getting ready for a long weekend away from home. But with gas prices creeping up across the country, American travel patterns are beginning to shift accordingly. For just over a week now, The Takeaway has been asking listeners to text us the price at their local pump. We’ve collated the information on an interactive map. In this conversation we discuss some of our findings with Andrea Bernstein, Director of the Transportation Nation project and senior correspondent for our flagship station WNYC.

Comments [1]

Transportation Nation

Obama's New Diesel Standards

Friday, October 01, 2010

(Alex Goldmark, Transportation Nation) New diesel fuel economy standards are expected to be finalized within a week and some in the diesel industry are taking the occasion to remind us about the other way to reduce pollution, making engine technology cleaner with clean diesel.   The new regulations are expected to require diesel engines to increase miles per gallon performance primarily for light trucks and heavy-duty vehicles, but regulating that category is no easy task.

In Europe, 50% of the cars on the road are diesel according to the Diesel Technology Forum. Here in the U.S though, diesel vehicles make up just 3% of of our vehicles, accounting for 10% of our nation's oil consumption, and 20% of the transit-related pollution. That's an environmental opportunity when you think of what a few extra miles-per-gallon would do with a bus or truck that travels over a million miles during its lifetime.

Its a complicated matter though to set fuel efficiency standards for heavy duty vehicles, a category that covers tractor trailers as well as construction vehicles like dump trucks. The fuel is consumed in many different ways, it could be used making cross country highway trips or in operating equipment on the truck while stationary like a cement mixer.  Some vehicles go 100,000 miles a year, others may not travel more than a few hundred, like a fire truck. Some argue per-mile efficiency may not be the best metric for reducing diesel consumption and pollution across the board. The NYT has a nice explanation of this and other regulatory puzzles that explain some of the delay in targeting this class of transit polluter.

Mileage standards are certainly one way to reduce diesel pollution, but technology is another. In anticipation of the new regulations, clean diesel advocates at the Diesel Technology Forum pointed out a 52% rise in clean diesel vehicle sales over a year ago. No one expects clean diesel to rival hybrids for the mantle of greener cars, but it may well be a growth market and an eco-opportunity.

One recent study by the National Academy of Sciences estimates that we can cut fuel consumption in heavy-duty vehicles almost in half with the combination of new technologies and diesel fuel economy standards. That's likely the kind of hopeful case for change the Obama administration will make when they release the official standards.

Read More

Comment

Transportation Nation

WSJ Finds Gas Mileage for Airlines. Will it Change Your Choice?

Friday, August 13, 2010

It's was a wonderful piece of reporting this week in the Middle Seat column of the Wall Street Journal: a review of DOT data, yielding what amounts to an MPG rating for the airlines.  Alaska came out on top, with a bit of luck (like being West Coast-based) and some good practices (like shutting down engines quickly at the gate).  The worst guzzlers turn out to the three biggest U.S. carriers.

But here's the big question: would information like this -- that getting you from LAX to JFK sucks around 10 gallons more fuel on Delta than it does on JetBlue on average -- cause you to change who you buy your ticket from?  Let us know in the comments.

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

New Fuel Efficiency Standards to Save Oil, Cut Pollution

Friday, April 02, 2010

The federal government announced its first ever mandatory limits for particular greenhouse gas emissions, as the EPA and the Department of Transportation announced new emissions rules for automobiles and light trucks yesterday.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Chevy Volt, Game Changer?

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

The Cash for Clunkers program heats up and people across America are trading in their gas guzzlers for new fuel efficient models. Adding fuel to the fire, General Motors announced yesterday that their electric car, the Chevy Volt, will get 230 miles per gallon during city driving. The car is expected to cost $40,000 and be on the market in November of next year. GM is calling it a "game changer," but is it too late for GM's game? Or could the Volt save GM and save the planet at the same time? We talk to Garry Golden, futurist and energy blogger, about fuel efficiency and the future of cars.

Here's how Chevy is selling its Volt:

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

What the Transportation Bill Really Means

Wednesday, May 20, 2009

Forget the fight over fuel efficiency standards. An even more controversial measure is on the horizon — the transportation reauthorization bill. It only comes up for debate every six years and could transform the way we commute and travel. Here to explain the behemoth transportation bill is Congressman Peter DeFazio, a Democrat from Eugene, Oregon.

For more on the transportation debate taking place across the country, listen to Miles O'Brien's interview, Traffic Jam: How to Reduce Congestion, on The Takeaway. Also, hear the lively debate on the fuel standards, California, Here We Come: New Fuel Standards.
"We’ve really been living off the legacy of the Eisenhower era ... And we haven’t even done a very good job of taking care of that legacy."
—Oregon Congressman Peter DeFazio on transportation reform

Comment

The Takeaway

Fuel Economy For the Future

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

President Obama is set to announce today new fuel efficiency standards for American cars. For the first time ever, auto manufacturers will have to meet a national standard. According to the Obama administration, the standards will be the equivalent of taking 177 million cars off the road by 2016. So what is the new standard and how does it compare with other countries are doing? We turn to Matt McGrath, the BBC's environment correspondent.

Comment

The Takeaway

California, Here We Come: New Fuel Standards

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

The Obama administration is expected to announce new national standards for car emissions and mileage today. The standards are expected to be comparable to the standards California sought, but were delayed by the Bush administration. Under the new standards, new cars and light trucks will have to get 35 miles per gallon by 2016. This will drive up the price of new cars, but drivers may recoup some of that money through savings on gas. Automakers aren't expected to challenge the new rules — but will the new standards help reduce demand for gas or change driver behavior? Joining The Takeaway to debate the new standards are Lisa Margonelli, fellow at the New America Foundation and author of Oil On the Brain: Petroleum's Long Strange Trip to Your Tank and Robert Farago, publisher of the blog The Truth About Cars.
"CAFE doesn't work. It hasn't worked. It will never work. There are too many loopholes now. There will be just as many in the future. The only way to get American's to use less gas is the way that's been proven, and that's to raise gas prices."
—Robert Farago of the blog The Truth About Cars on CAFE standards

Comments [6]