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Foreign Relations

The Takeaway

U.S. Tackles Tensions Between Japan & China

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

President Barack Obama lands in Tokyo today, the first stop on his week-long trip through Southeast Asia. At the top of his agenda are the rising tensions between Japan and China.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Will US Forces Withdraw from Afghanistan?

Friday, November 22, 2013

This week, John Kerry announced that a security pact between the US and Afghanistan had been agreed upon. But in a surprise announcement just a day later, Afghan President Hamid Karzai announced the pact would not be signed until after Afghanistan’s presidential elections in April 2014, leaving the US military’s future presence in the country unclear. NPR’s international correspondent Sean Carberry in Kabul, and David Sanger, New York Times chief Washington correspondent and author of Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power discuss the possible deal, which allowed troops to stay in Afghanistan until 2024 -- although the President has long promised 2014 would be the deadline.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

U.S. Raids in Africa

Wednesday, October 09, 2013

Karen DeYoung, senior national security correspondent and associate editor at The Washington Post, discusses the U.S. military raids in Africa over the weekend. She has reported on what the unsuccessful mission in Somalia indicates about the Obama administration's priorities and new counter-terrorism guidelines, and also about news today that the Pentagon is cutting some military aid to Egypt.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

President Obama in Mexico

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

President Obama is visiting Mexico Thursday. Shannon O'Neil, senior fellow for Latin America Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of Two Nations Indivisible: Mexico, the United States, and the Road Ahead, talks about what to expect from the trip and the relationship between Obama and President Pena Nieto.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Jay and Bey in Cuba: An Explainer

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Does Jay-Z and Beyoncé's trip to Cuba violate Treasury Department sanctions? Julia Sweig, Senior Fellow and Director of Latin America Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations tells Brian Lehrer how tourism regulations tie into the state of U.S.-Cuba relations.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Situation in Pakistan

Thursday, January 17, 2013

New York Times reporter Declan Walsh in Islamabad and Marvin Weinbaum, who served as analyst for Pakistan and Afghanistan in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research from 1999 to 2003, examines the current political crisis in Pakistan. Weinbaum is currently a scholar-in-residence at the Middle East Institute in Washington, D.C.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

China: The Game Changer

Monday, December 10, 2012

Elizabeth Economy, senior fellow and director for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, talks to Brian about his reflections on China and her piece "The Game Changer" about China's diplomacy.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: Your U.S. Cultural Ambassador Picks

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Amanda Dobbins, writer for New York Magazine's Vulture blog, helps callers answer the question: Which American would you select as cultural ambassador, where would you send them and why? Call 212-433-9692 or post your nomination below.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

China and the World Since 1750

Friday, September 14, 2012

Historian Odd Arne Westad traces China’s foreign affairs over the past 250 years, identifying the forces that will likely determine the country’s future. In Restless Empire: China and the World Since 1750, Westad makes the case that China’s success will ultimately hinge on its ability to engage with potential international partners while simultaneously safeguarding its own strength and stability.

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The Takeaway

The Dangers of Unilateralism for the U.S.

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Is the "fiscal cliff" math, the denial-ridden presidential campaign and the whimsical pattern of federal regulations over the financial sector trying the patience of the rest of the world? Many believe that the unilateral style of the U.S. is driving the country out of its "number one" spot in the global economy.

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It's A Free Country ®

Romney's Visit to Poland Applauded in Brooklyn's Greenpoint

Monday, July 30, 2012

Presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s overseas trip has left his team struggling to explain some of the remarks he made in Great Britain and Israel. But in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, some Poles expressed satisfaction at the hopeful’s choice to visit their home country for the last leg of his trip.

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WNYC News

Former US Ambassador to China Says Chen Solution was ‘Elegant’

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Chen Guangcheng’s decision to seek refuge at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing suggests it is "the safest place in China," former U.S. Ambassador to China said in a talk organized by the National Committee on United States-China Relations in New York on Wednesday.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: The GOP's Dumb Pivot to Foreign Affairs

Thursday, April 26, 2012

It's a bad sign for Republicans if their candidate is trying to focus the debate back on international security.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Andrea Mitchell on Politics

Thursday, March 01, 2012

Andrea Mitchell, NBC News chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of Andrea Mitchell Reports on MSNBC, discusses national politics.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Remembering Richard Holbrooke

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Kati Marton, Richard Holbrooke’s widow;James Traub, contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine; and Reuters columnist David Rohde, talk about the career of Richard Holbrooke, who was a pivotal player in U.S. diplomacy for more than 40 years and who died last December. Most recently special envoy for Iraq and Afghanistan under President Obama, Holbrooke also served as assistant secretary of state for both Asia and Europe, and as ambassador to both Germany and the United Nations, and played a key role in brokering a peace agreement in Bosnia that led to the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords. The Unquiet American: Richard Holbrooke in the World is a tribute to his work as a public servant and a backstage history of the last half-century of American foreign policy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Can Intervention Work?

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Rory Stewart, a member of the British Parliament, discusses political and military interventions and examines what we can—and cannot—achieve through "nation building." Can Intervention Work?, written with Gerald Knaus, looks at how the massive, military-driven efforts in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Balkans, the expansion of the EU, and the "color" revolutions in the former Soviet states affect international relations, human rights, and our understanding of state building.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Pakistan: Playing with Fire

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Pamela Constable, foreign correspondent and former deputy editor at The Washington Post, discusses Pakistan, a volatile nation at the heart of major cultural, political, and religious conflicts in the world today, and one that continues to struggle over its identity, alliances, and direction. Playing with Fire: Pakistan at War with Itself is based on Constable’s many years of reporting in the region. It explores Pakistan's contradictions, confusion, struggles with inequality and corruption, and how competing versions of Islam divide the country. She also discusses U.S.-Pakistan relations, the ISI, and why the country is so strategically and politically important.

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The Takeaway

Henry Kissinger Interview Part 3: Middle East

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Over three decades have passed since Henry Kissinger served as Secretary of State for the Richard Nixon, and then Gerald Ford, and his advice is still sought and respected by politicians and world leaders. In the third installment of our interview with him, he shares his thoughts on the Arab spring, Israel and Palestine, and how President Obama is handling all of this.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Our Man in Tehran

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Canadian Ambassador Ken Taylor talks about his involvement with the rescue missions to free the hostages in Iran in 1981. His work as the “de facto CIA station chief” has just recently been declassified. He is the subject of Our Man in Tehran: The True Story Behind the Secret Mission to Save Six Americans during the Iran Hostage Crisis and the Foreign Ambassador Who Worked with the CIA to Bring Them Home, written by Robert Wright, which looks at pre-revolutionary Iran, the hostage crisis, and Taylor’s role in freeing the hostages.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Why Americans Choose War

Thursday, November 11, 2010

From the American Revolution to the end of World War II, the United States spent 19 years at war against other nations. But since 1950, it has spent 22 years and counting. Noted scholar Richard E. Rubenstein explores the rhetoric that sells war to the American public and the underlying cultural and social factors that make it so effective. In Reasons to Kill: Why Americans Choose War, he offers new ways to think about issues of war and peace.

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