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Foreign Policy

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Life and Influence of George F. Kennan

Thursday, December 01, 2011

Yale historian John Lewis Gaddis talks about George Kennan, troubled Cold War mastermind. In the late 1940s, George Kennan wrote two documents that set the strategy of containment that defined U.S. policy toward the Soviet Union for the next four decades. He was also an architect of the Marshall Plan and would become an outspoken critic of American diplomacy, politics, and culture. George F. Kennan: An American Life took almost 30 years to write, is based on interviews with Kennan and his voluminous diaries and other personal papers.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: The Stories You Missed in 2011

Thursday, December 01, 2011

On this week’s Underreported, Foreign Policy’s Joshua Keating discusses “The Stories You Missed in 2011,” including India’s military buildup and the shrinking supply of camel meat in Saudi Arabia.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Remembering Richard Holbrooke

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Kati Marton, Richard Holbrooke’s widow;James Traub, contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine; and Reuters columnist David Rohde, talk about the career of Richard Holbrooke, who was a pivotal player in U.S. diplomacy for more than 40 years and who died last December. Most recently special envoy for Iraq and Afghanistan under President Obama, Holbrooke also served as assistant secretary of state for both Asia and Europe, and as ambassador to both Germany and the United Nations, and played a key role in brokering a peace agreement in Bosnia that led to the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords. The Unquiet American: Richard Holbrooke in the World is a tribute to his work as a public servant and a backstage history of the last half-century of American foreign policy.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan's Ambassador to the US Resigns

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Former journalist and human rights activist Sherry Rehman has been named as Pakistan's new ambassador to the United States. Rehman will replace Husain Haqqani, who resigned amid accusations he was involved in an effort to engage the U.S. to curb the Army's powers in Pakistan. Haqqani allegedly sent an anonymous memo sent to Admiral Mike Mullen after the raid that killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistani in May. The memo requested Washington’s help in diminishing the power of the Pakistani army. In recent days, a Pakistani-American businessman has said he was instructed to write the memo by Haqqani. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

GOP Foreign Policy Debate Round-Up

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Todd Zwillich, Washington correspondent for the Takeaway, and Reihan Salam, columnist at The Daily and blogger for National Review Online's The Agenda, discuss last night's GOP debate and go through what the candidates did and didn't say about foreign policy.

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The Takeaway

GOP Candidates Debate Security and Foreign Policy

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

The GOP presidential candidates discussed foreign policy and national security during yet another debate on Tuesday night. The candidates attempted to subtle distinctions between each other in policies on Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Patriot Act, Iran, and Israel. Newt Gingrich, the current front runner, made waves when he suggested the party should not adopt an immigration policy that "destroys families that have been here a quarter-century."

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The Takeaway

Spotlight on Newt Gingrich in Next GOP Debate

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

The Republican candidates will debate again tonight on foreign policy. But this time around, Newt Gingrich is leading in the polls. It's a major comeback for Gingrich who started out ahead and took a heavy hit early on. He's now doing one percentage point better than former front-runner Mitt Romney. But is this just a passing trend? Or is he now a serious contender? 

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The Takeaway

Anne-Marie Slaughter on Lessons the US Should Take From Libya

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

When Anne-Marie Slaughter joined the Obama administration as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's director of policy planning she became the first woman to hold the position. In February, Slaughter left the job as protests were beginning in Libya. Since leaving office, she's been very vocal about her concerns regarding the U.S. approach to Libya through blogging for The Atlantic, appearing on many news outlets, and maintaining an active presence on Twitter

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: The UN General Assembly

Friday, September 23, 2011

The General Debate of the 66th Session of the United Nations General Assembly is happening in New York through September 30. The General Assembly is the main deliberative, policymaking and representative organ of the United Nations, comprising all 193 Members of the United Nations. On this week's Please Explain we start off with Warren Hoge, Senior Advisor for External Relations for the International Peace Institute in New York and former foreign correspondent for the New York Times, covering the UN. Then we're joined by Vera Jelinek, Divisional Dean and Director of the Center for Global Affairs at New York University School of Continuing and Professional Studies, and Stanley Meisler, author of  The United Nations: The First Fifty Years, and  United Nations: A History, will tell us how the General Assembly works and what comes out of the sessions.

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It's A Free Country ®

Thomas Friedman and Michael Mandelbaum the Decline (and Potential Comeback) of the U.S.

Wednesday, September 07, 2011

We wrote this book because neither of us want to be on duty when the American dream goes dark.

Three-time Pulitzer Prize winning author and New York Times columnist Thomas L. Friedman on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Can Intervention Work?

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Rory Stewart, a member of the British Parliament, discusses political and military interventions and examines what we can—and cannot—achieve through "nation building." Can Intervention Work?, written with Gerald Knaus, looks at how the massive, military-driven efforts in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Balkans, the expansion of the EU, and the "color" revolutions in the former Soviet states affect international relations, human rights, and our understanding of state building.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

State vs. Defense

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Stephen Glain examines the tension between the diplomats in the State Department and the warriors at Defense. In his book State vs. Defense: The Battle to Define America's Empire, Glain profiles the figures who crafted American foreign policy, from George Marshall to Robert McNamara to Henry Kissinger to Don Rumsfeld, in order to reveal why he sees America becoming increasingly imperial and militaristic, and why he thinks it will lead to our financial peril.

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It's A Free Country ®

Pawlenty Embraces Bush Foreign Policy Rhetoric but Not Bush Himself

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

A two-term governor of Minnesota, Tim Pawlenty’s foreign policy experience consists mostly of his trips to Iraq and Afghanistan to visit Minnesota National Guard troops. Up to this point, he's run on his record in Minnesota, where he wielded vetoes to cut the size of government despite a Democratically controlled legislature. And he did it with unflappable niceness.

But in a Republican field without a John McCain (or a Colin Powell or David Petraeus waiting in the wings), Pawlenty sees some unclaimed territory on the party plank. In his first major speech about war and security at the Council on Foreign Relations on Tuesday, Pawlenty articulated a robust, hawkish foreign policy driven by “moral clarity” — and took swings at President Obama and his fellow Republicans in the process.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Henry Kissinger on China

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Dr. Henry Kissinger discusses China, a country he has known intimately for decades, and whose modern relations with the West he helped shape.  In On China, he draws on historical records as well as his conversations with Chinese leaders over the past 40 years to examine how China has approached diplomacy, strategy, and negotiation throughout its history, and reflects on the consequences for the global balance of power in the 21st century.

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The Takeaway

Henry Kissinger Interview Part 3: Middle East

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Over three decades have passed since Henry Kissinger served as Secretary of State for the Richard Nixon, and then Gerald Ford, and his advice is still sought and respected by politicians and world leaders. In the third installment of our interview with him, he shares his thoughts on the Arab spring, Israel and Palestine, and how President Obama is handling all of this.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Debt Ceiling, Middle East, IMF

Monday, May 16, 2011

While Washington continues tp debate the debt ceiling, the United States is expected to reach the limit on its debt today. This means the government will no longer be able to borrow money. Charlie Herman, business and economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio, says it's just a mystery what will happen, because we're not seeing any deals on the table yet. There are questions about the future of the International Monetary Fund after its managing director, Dominique Strauss-Kahn was arrested in New York for allegedly sexually assaulting a Manhattan hotel maid.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Secretary Hillary Clinton and the Middle East

Monday, May 09, 2011

Jonathan Alter, MSNBC analyst and author of The Promise: President Obama, Year Onetalks about U.S. foreign policy and his Vanity Fair profile of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Plus: Marwan Bishara, senior political analyst for Al-Jazeera English and host of Empire, a monthly show about global powers, discusses the view from the Middle East with respect to the Arab Spring and the death of Osama bin Laden.

Listen, Read a Recap, and Add Your Comments at It's A Free Country

The Brian Lehrer Show

WikiLeaks' Lawyer

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Mark Stephens, Julian Assange’s attorney, talks about the effects of Wikileaks on transparency and foreign policy. 

Mark Stephens is taking part in a panel discussion this evening at Columbia Journalism School: Life After WikiLeaks: Who Won the Information War?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Anatol Lieven on Pakistan

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

Anatol Lieven, professor in the War Studies department at King’s College, London, and Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation talks about Pakistan’s increasing importance to south Asia and to the United States. He’ll discuss the rise of Islamic extremism and the Taliban in the area, and U.S. relations with Pakistan in the war on terror, the search and discovery of Osama bin Laden, and the war in Afghanistan. His latest book is Pakistan: A Hard Country.

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The Takeaway

Ret. Air Force Col. Sam Gardiner: 'There is No Islamic Extremism'

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

The U.S. has been at war in Afghanistan for almost ten years, with one of the main objectives to hunt down Osama bin Laden. With bin Laden now dead — killed by American Navy Seals, and buried at sea — does U.S. foreign policy on the global war on terrorism have to change? Retired Air Force Colonel, Sam Gardiner believes President Obama will have to find a good argument to stay at war in Afghanistan.

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