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Foreign Policy

PRI's The World

'Do more with less' might be the military's unofficial motto

Thursday, September 18, 2014

The US military is both fighting ISIS in Iraq in Syria and helping medical efforts against Ebola in West Africa. So what, in 2014, is the core purpose of the US military? And what might the future hold?

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PRI's The World

The US is struggling to define its place in a 'world on fire'

Thursday, September 04, 2014

In a year of never-ending crises from Ukraine to Syria to Gaza to West Africa, the United States isn't always the country getting results. What does that mean for America's place in the world?

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WNYC News

Where Does Your Member of Congress Stand on Syria? Where do You?

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Congress is debating President Obama's plan for a military strike on Syria. Here's where the 39 members of the U.S. House of Representatives and four U.S. Senators from New York and New Jersey stand on the President's proposal. Find out where your representative stands, and voice your opinion on WNYC and directly to your Member of Congress. 

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The Takeaway

Senior American Officials Call For Policy Change on Iran

Monday, April 22, 2013

Since 1979, the US has issued sanctions on trade with Iran. The goal of these sanctions is to support diplomatic efforts to peacefully resolve the disagreements with Iran without having to resort to violent means. But a new report argues that sanctions against Iran are backfiring and failing to reinforce diplomatic efforts.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Algerian Hostage Crisis

Friday, January 18, 2013

John P. Entelis, professor of political science and director of the Middle East Studies Program at Fordham University, talks about the background of the hostage situation at an Algerian gas field, and the actions of the Algerian government. Entelis is also the editor of The Journal of North African Studies.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Ferdinand Marcos and John Lindsay Foster U.S.-Philippines Ties, 1966

Monday, November 12, 2012

WNYC
Philippine dictator hailed at City Hall.
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The Brian Lehrer Show

Romney on Foreign Policy

Tuesday, October 09, 2012

Fred Kaplan, War Stories columnist for Slate, talks about Mitt Romney's foreign policy speech.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

David Sanger on Embassies and US Foreign Policy

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

WNYC contributor David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times and author of Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power, discusses the policy implications of the continuing embassy protests and looks ahead to the U.N. General Assembly gathering in New York.

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It's A Free Blog

Obama's UK Speech Paves Path Forward - But What About Libya?

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Listening to President Obama's address to the British Parliament, you wouldn't think our war in Libya is a very big deal. Its first mention is two-thirds of the way through the speech, the discussion of it lasts a single paragraph, and it is called an "action," "crackdown" and effort to ensure "the people of Libya are protected." Hardly a war at all.

-Justin Krebs, on the Obama administration's mixed foreign policy messages.

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The Takeaway

Response to Quran Burning in Florida: Protest and Dozens Dead in Afghanistan

Monday, April 04, 2011

The burning of a Quran at a Florida church has set off a wave of violence in Afghanistan. Thousands of protesters mobbed the United Nations building in Mazar-i-Sharif on Friday. Seven U.N. workers were murdered, and protests against the United States raged in Kandahar over the weekend, killing dozens. President Obama and General David Petraeus condemned the Florida pastor’s actions. Including the U.N. workers, 24 people have died since protests began last Friday.

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The Takeaway

Syria: The Newest Member to Arab World Unrest

Monday, March 28, 2011

Syria is the latest in a list of countries like Egypt, Tunisia, and Libya, as disenfranchised citizens in that country have gone to the streets in recent weeks, to protest President Bashar al-Assad's eleven-year reign. The protests have been met with violence; dozens have been reportedly killed by security forces. In response to the protests, the government has repeatedly suggested it may lift the country's emergency law — which allows the leadership to arrest without cause or warrant among other powers — as a concession to protesters. But many are already calling it a bluff. 

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Libya, Middle East, Unemployment

Monday, March 28, 2011

With support from coalition forces in the air, Libyan rebel forces have been able to recapture recent losses and are pushing towards Col. Moammar Gadhafi's strongholds. However, the U.S. is committed to passing responsibility on and Defense Secretary Robert Gates told NBC's "Meet the Press," "beginning this week or within the next week or so, we will begin to diminish the commitment of resources that we have committed to this." Marcus Mabry, editor-at-large of the International Herald Tribune, looks at how the impact of a U.S. drawdown could impact the situation in Libya.

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The Takeaway

Libya: Who is Iman Al Obeidi?

Monday, March 28, 2011

When a Libyan woman burst into the Tripoli hotel where foreign journalists convened, her story of rape at the hands of Gadhafi's militia men was heard around the world. Correspondent for The New York Times David Kirkpatrick was there. Her story is that she was abducted and tortured, but government officials are saying that she’s a prostitute with a long criminal record. She was beaten and dragged away by security officials. David Kirkpatrick says that Libyan officials had said that reporters would be able to talk to her again, but that this is unlikely. 

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The Takeaway

State Dept's PJ Crowley on US Mid-East Foreign Policy

Friday, February 18, 2011

Egypt, Bahrain, Yemen, Libya: Friend or foe? That question is getting harder to answer, as crackdowns on protests in the Middle East by U.S. allied governments blur the lines. Just in December, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised Bahrain for its progress on the road to democracy. Today, the State Department reaped criticism for their weak stance against the police violence that has left at least six dead. But how will the U.S. realign itself, should Shiite protestors topple the government in Bahrain — a strategic partner that guarantees military access to the region? And what about Yemen, an ally against terrorist forces in the region? What will the new U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East look like after the wave of change is over?

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It's A Free Country ®

How Will Uprisings Change U.S. Policy in the Middle East?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

WNYC
We had a deal with the Arab world for 30 years which was, you give us cheap oil, a stable supply of oil, and we'll stay out of your business. That deal fell apart on 9/11. First of all, oil is no longer cheap, and secondly, they weren't stable, and obviously threatened us. Reform in the Arab world has been something since 9/11 the U.S. government has been trying to push. We didn't know how to do it, George Bush thought we would invade Iraq and democracy would blossom all around the Arab world, that did not happen.

Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

US Foreign Policy: Egypt and Beyond

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Ambassador Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador, and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, joins us to talk about the U.S. response to democratic movements beyond Egypt.

→ Read a Recap and Join the Discussion at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Your Take: Egypt's Uprising

Monday, February 14, 2011

When news broke that Mubarak was stepping down, Takeaway listeners responded. Lindsay Knapp wrote to us: 

When I said this morning that Egypt was having a 1776 moment, I had no idea how true it would be! 18 days of protest have changed a nation — congratulations to all the people of Egypt, and welcome to democracy.

 

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The Takeaway

Reflecting on Donald Rumsfeld's Storied Career

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

This week, Donald Rumsfeld, secretary of defense for much of the George W. Bush administration, released his memoir, "Known and Unknown." The former Secretary of Defense is known for his phrasing and we take a listen back to his language, and his unapologetic legacy.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Rachel Martin on Egypt and the U.S.

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Rachel Martin, national security correspondent for NPR, discusses Washington's reaction to the unfolding events in Egypt. 

Read More and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

The US and China: Neither Friends Nor Rivals

Monday, January 17, 2011

As Washington prepares for a visit from Chinese President Hu Jintao this week, we take a look at what lies ahead in the shifting relationship between superpowers. Should we fear the "waking dragon"? We're joined by Gideon Rachman, chief foreign-affairs commentator for the Financial Times and author of "Zero-Sum Future: American Power in an Age of Anxiety," and Simon Tay, was an Asia Society 2009 Bernard Schwartz Fellow and is Chairman of the Singapore Institute of International Affairs. He is also the author of "Asia Alone: The Dangerous Post-Crisis Divide from America."

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