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Foodways

Tea Tuesdays: Butter Up That Tea, Tibetan-Style

Tuesday, May 05, 2015

Yak butter tea is often referred to as the national drink of Tibet. It's been consumed in the Himalayas for centuries and helped inspire the Bulletproof Coffee craze in the U.S.

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What's Inside A 'Derby Pie'? Maybe A Lawsuit Waiting To Happen

Friday, May 01, 2015

Around Louisville, "derby pie" is de rigueur fare for the Kentucky Derby. But the pie's creators are real sticklers about what can be called a "derby pie" — and they're not afraid to sue over it.

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Lunch With Monet, Dinner With Jackson Pollock

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Two new books focus on the culinary lives of these two artists. Turns out, their approaches to food provide a new way of thinking about their two very different approaches to art.

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Tea Tuesdays: Tea, Tao And Tourists — China's Mount Hua Is Three-Part Harmony

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

One of China's five sacred mountains, Mount Hua is a lotus-shaped range of peaks and hub of Taoism. It has many harrowing paths to well-being — and to tea.

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The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Fried yellow chilis. Baja-style fish. Not the typical Chinese restaurant fare, unless you're near the U.S.-Mexico border. The reasons why go back to an 1882 law enacted to keep Chinese out of the U.S.

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Tea Tuesdays: The Evolution Of Tea Sets From Ancient Legend To Modern Biometrics

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Legend has it that a Chinese emperor first discovered tea more than 4,700 years ago. As the culture surrounding tea has changed through the centuries, so, too, have the tools we use to drink it.

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In Korea, Spam Isn't Junk Meat — It's A Treat

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

It's a gelatinous slab of pork, salt and starch — and in fancy packaging, it's a popular holiday gift. So how did South Korea become the world's No. 2 Spam consumer? Blame it on the war.

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Tea Tuesdays: How Tea + Sugar Reshaped The British Empire

Tuesday, April 07, 2015

When tea met sugar, they formed a power couple that altered the course of history. It was a marriage shaped by fashion, health fads and global economics. And it doomed millions of Africans to slavery.

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Morning Edition

Celebrating Passover: The History And Symbolism Of Matzo Balls

Friday, April 03, 2015

Matzo balls are at the center of any Passover seder. Cookbook author Joan Nathan, known as the "grande dame" of Jewish cooking, explains the history behind this culinary tradition.

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All Things Considered

How The Matzo Crumbles: Iconic Streit's Factory To Leave Manhattan

Thursday, April 02, 2015

It's the end of an era: After nearly a century, the Streit's matzo factory is leaving Manhattan's Lower East Side. This Passover will be its last there. Streit's plans to move to a new factory.

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All Things Considered

With Nostalgia And A Last Nosh, 1 Of 3 Remaining HoJo's Closes

Wednesday, April 01, 2015

The iconic orange roofs of Howard Johnson's restaurants were once fixtures of the American highway. But the chain faded in the '80s. The 60-year-old location in Lake Placid, N.Y., closed Tuesday.

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The Revival Of Lamb Ham: A Colonial Tradition Renewed

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

British colonialists brought lamb ham to America, where a sugar-cured, smoked variety became popular. Easier-to-cure pork ham eventually took its place, but now two Virginians are bringing it back.

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Making Cheese In The Land Of The Bible: Add Myrrh And A Leap Of Faith

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Spring in the West Bank means Bedouin herders' ewes and nanny goats are full of milk — and cheese making abounds. The traditional method relies on a few simple ingredients and a long cultural memory.

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Morning Edition

Vanilla, Nutmeg Spice And Everything Nice On A Zanzibar Farm

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Three spices that grow on the island of Zanzibar are so common they might be flavoring your morning cup of coffee. But vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg have very different origins.

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Liberte, Egalite, Gastronomie? France Rallies To Defend Its Food's Honor

Monday, March 23, 2015

With fast food now a staple at home and Danish and Spanish chefs in the limelight, France's culinary supremacy is no longer a given. The government has mobilized to save French food traditions.

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All Things Considered

This Spanish Pig-Slaughtering Tradition Is Rooted In Sustainability

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

In Spanish villages, townspeople gather at dawn to collectively slaughter a pig, then prepare every last bit as food, even the ears. The ancient ritual, called matanza, is now drawing foodie tourists.

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Tea Tuesdays: Gift Of The Moon, Bane Of The Spanish — The Story Of Yerba Mate

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Legend has it the moon gifted this drink to the Guaraní people of South America. It was banned by the colonial government. The Jesuits made it their most profitable crop. Oh, and the pope drinks it.

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To Eat Authentically Irish This St. Patrick's Day, Go For The Butter

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

From 3,000-year-old peat bogs to 19th-century Brazil to modern foodies, the love of Irish butter has spread far. The secret to Ireland's deliciously rich, creamy butter is in its rolling green hills.

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All Things Considered

Meet Chef Chane, Ethiopia's Version Of The Infamous 'Soup Nazi'

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Like the famously curt broth ladler on Seinfeld, Addis Ababa's Chef Chane is known for serving up both delectable cuisine and insults. He says he learned his vaunted culinary skills in royal kitchens.

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The Family Peach Farm That Became A Symbol Of The Food Revolution

Saturday, March 14, 2015

Heirloom peach trees, and an essay about them, turned one California farm into a landmark of local food. It's now the scene of another unconventional choice: a daughter's return to take the helm.

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