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The Leonard Lopate Show

Globavores: Chocolate

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

This week's installment of our series Globavores, about the foods of the Columbian Exchange, is all about chocolate, which had rich, long history in the Americas long before Europeans arrived. Chocolatier Jacques Torres and Louis Grivetti, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Nutrition at UC Davis, talk about the origins of chocolate in Mesoamerica and how the cacao seed has traveled around the globe transforming cuisine and palates along the way.

Chocolate Recipes from Jacques Torres

Contemporary Chocolate Recipes from Louis Grivetti

Historical Chocolate Recipes from Louis Grivetti

Share your favorite chocolate recipe! Leave it as a comment, below!

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The Takeaway

The Rise of the Pumpkin-Flavored Seasonal Snack

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Last year more than 60 pumpkin-related dishes appeared on the menus of America’s top 250 chain restaurants. According to restraint industry analyst Dataessential, 2012 is on track to break last year’s records. So why pumpkins? And what’s the economic impact? Felix Salmon, finance blogger at Reuters, investigates.

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Features

What's For Dinner? Fueling A Presidential Debate

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Both candidates fueled up on potatoes and meat last night as they prepared for the debate at separate Marriotts near Hofstra University. But did what they choose to eat help their performance? We asked an expert to weigh in.

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Features

Here's The Scoop On Cat Poop Coffee

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Would you pay $25 for one ounce of coffee from beans that traveled an animal's intestinal system? Many people do, and like it, although I'm not so sure. In fact, a whole industry has cropped up around cat poop coffee, which experts say has degraded the taste of the real thing.

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America's Test Kitchen Radio

133: Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America

Friday, October 12, 2012

This time on America’s Test Kitchen, we speak with Gustavo Arellano, author of Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America, about the most powerful immigrant cuisine in America and find out why he defends Taco Bell. We’ll find out what’s hot and what’s not in the world of kitchen gadgets, and we’ll travel back in time to discover the origins of chicken nuggets. We’ll be tasting cocoa powder, then we’ll head into the test kitchen to learn how to make great butternut squash soup. And of course, we’ll be taking your calls to answer all of your cooking questions.

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America's Test Kitchen Radio

133: Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America

Friday, October 12, 2012

This time on America’s Test Kitchen, we speak with Gustavo Arellano, author of Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America, about the most powerful immigrant cuisine in America and find out why he defends Taco Bell. We’ll find out what’s hot and what’s not in the world of kitchen gadgets, and we’ll travel back in time to discover the origins of chicken nuggets. We’ll be tasting cocoa powder, then we’ll head into the test kitchen to learn how to make great butternut squash soup. And of course, we’ll be taking your calls to answer all of your cooking questions.

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Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: In the Cornfield

Friday, October 12, 2012

Farmer Kurt Alstede recommends eating fresh sweet corn raw and explained why a little dry weather can make for sweeter fruits and vegetables. Also, try Alstede Farms' recipe for Basil Tomato Cream Corn.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Coquilles, Calva, and Crème

Thursday, October 11, 2012

G. Y. Dryansky takes us on a sweeping sensory journey from Paris to Normandy, Alsace, the Basque country, and beyond, sharing stories of evenings with Coco Chanel and Yves Saint Laurent, historic wine auctions and memorable banquets. Coquilles, Calva, and Crème: Exploring France's Culinary Heritage: A Love Affair with Real French Foodis an account of his travels across modern-day France, through kitchens, farms, and vineyards—with recipes.

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The Takeaway

Consider the Fork: A Food Writer's Cultural History

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Food writer and historian Bee Wilson, author of the new book: "Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat," explains how our relationship with food is emotional, primal, familial, and cultural.

Comments [1]

Features

Liquid Nitrogen Cocktails: Smoking Hot Trend Or Unnecessary Risk?

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

The latest victim injured by a liquid nitrogen cocktail had to have parts of her stomach removed. Yet some in the bar business say the substance is safe when used properly. What do you think? Take our survey.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Stanley Tucci's Recipe: Simple Ricotta Cake

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

This cake is best made one day before you plan to serve it. The cake is very moist and tender, so be careful when removing it from the pan. If you like, it may be served with the sauce described in the recipe for Ricotta Cheese with Fresh Fruit  (page 349), using either raspberries or strawberries for the sauce.

2 cups ricotta cheese
1 ½ tablespoons butter, softened
5 large eggs
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 ¼ cups confectioners’ sugar
2 tablespoons pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon dark rum (such as Myers’s) (optional)
2 cups heavy cream
½ teaspoon grated lemon or orange zest

1.    If the ricotta cheese is very wet, place it in a fine-mesh sieve lined with cheesecloth. Place the sieve over a bowl, refrigerate, and drain the ricotta for 2 hours.
2.    Preheat the oven to 325 ºF. Completely line an 8-inch springform pan with two overlapping layers of aluminum foil. Grease the foil with the softened butter and dust lightly with flour, set aside.
3.    Place the eggs in a large bowl. With an electric mixer set on high speed, beat the eggs just to combing, about 10 seconds. Add the ricotta, flour, sugar, vanilla, and rum, if using, and beat just to combine. Reduce the mixer speed to low and gradually add the cream. Stir in the zest.
4.    Pour the mixture into the prepared springform pan, and bake until the edges of the cake are firm and the top is golden brown, about 1 hour. (If the top begins to brown too quickly, cover the pan with aluminum foil and continue to bake.) Remove the pan from the oven, set it on a wire rack, and allow to cool for 3 to 4 hours. Remove the outer ring of the pan and cut away the foil. Cover and refrigerate the cake for at least 3 hours before serving.

SERVES 8

From The Tucci Cookbook, by Stanley Tucci

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Stanley Tucci's Recipe: Concetta’s Stuffed Artichokes

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

When we began work on this book project it was before my grandmother had passed away at the age of eighty-seven, and we were very excited about preserving so many of her recipes. One day my mother went to visit my grandmother in the hospital. She told her that we didn’t have her recipe for stuffed artichokes and we wanted to include it in the book. Without hesitation my grandmother began to tell her how she prepared them. The nurse who was attending her said, “Only an Italian could come out of surgery and start discussing food.” But the telling of a recipe is very different from the actual process of making a dish with its creator. So this recipe, which is named for my grandmother, is based on memories of her stuffed artichokes.


4 medium-size or 2 extra-large artichokes, stems and top ¼ inch sliced off and discarded, sharp outer leaf points snipped off and discarded
2 teaspoons chopped fresh Italian, flat leafed parsley
5 teaspoons finely grated pecorino Romano cheese
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup coarsely grated day-old bread or 1 cup plain dried bread crumbs, or a combination of both
4 tablespoons olive oil

1.    Preheat the oven to 350ºF.
2.    Snugly fit the artichokes in a small saucepan and add water to a depth ¼ inch below the tops of the artichokes. Cover, bring to a boil, and simmer until an outside leaf pulls away easily, about 20 minutes. Do not overcook or the artichokes will fall apart. Remove from the water, turn upside down to drain, and set aside to cool.
3.    In a small bowl, mix the parsley, Romano cheese, garlic, and bread. Sprinkle teaspoons of the filling between the leaves, working from the outer leaves toward the center of the artichoke, spreading the inner leaves slightly if necessary. Place the artichokes in a glass baking pan. Drizzle 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over each artichoke (2 tablespoons if using extra-large ones). Fill the pan with water to a depth of 1 inch. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the foil, add more water to the pan if necessary, and continue baking until the artichokes are tender and lightly browned, about 15 minutes more. Serve hot or at room temperature.

SERVES 4

WINE PAIRING: Light white and medium white

VARIATIONS: When serving steamed or boiled artichokes that have not been stuffed, I like to whisk 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice and ¼ cup melted butter to dip the tender leaves into before eating. One steamed artichoke may be served as part of an antipasto with drinks before dinner. Separate the leaves and arrange them on a platter. Serve along with a small dish of Basic Vinaigrette.

From The Tucci Cookbook, by Stanley Tucci.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Zarela's Recipe: Pimpo

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Toasted Corn Flour Cookies

I was walking through the crowded marketplace at Juchitán, the capital of the Isthmus, when I nearly stumbled over María Ruíz sitting daintily on the ground with two small children in the shade of an arch, next to a basket lined with a snowy embroidered cloth.  I was already attuned enough to the region to think that this pretty young woman did not look quite like the flamboyant juchitecas around her, and sure enough I learned that she was from the town of Tehuantepec some twenty miles distant, where they specialize in making totopos dulces, sweet crackers of fine corn flour and dried coconut.  I could not replicate María's totopos, which require a tandoorlike sunken clay oven, but she gave me her recipe for these little cousins that can be made like cookies in a regular oven.

To grate the sugar, use the fine side of a standard straight-sided grater.  The recipe requires a starchy type of corn.

One 1- 1 1/2-inch piece canela
4 cups dried dent or flour corn kernels 
1/2 cup grated Mexican brown loaf sugar (panela or piloncillo; see page 000), packed before measuring, or 1/2 cup dark brown sugar
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, cold

Preheat the oven to 375°F.

Grind the canela in an electric coffee or spice grinder.  Set aside.

Spread the corn on a large baking sheet and bake until the kernels are bright yellow, about 40 minutes.  Remove and let cool completely while keeping the oven set to 375°F.

The corn must now be ground to a fine powdery flour.  I prefer to do this in an electric coffee or spice grinder, about 3/4 cup at a time. (You can also grind the kernels in several batches in a food processor, but the flour will not be as finely or evenly ground. 4 cups whole kernels should yield about 2 1/2 cups flour.)   Mix well with the ground canela.  

In a large bowl, cream the butter well and beat in the sugar; continue to beat until light and fluffy.  Gradually add the toasted corn flour mixture, beating well after each addition.  It will form a somewhat stiff dough.

Roll out the dough on a lightly floured board to about 1/2-inch thickness.  With a cookie cutter, cut into 1-inch rounds.  Reroll leftover scraps of dough for cutting until all is used.  Place on a greased baking sheet and bake for 10 - 12 minutes.

Yield: About 3 dozen 1-inch cookies

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Zarela's Recipe: Esquites

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

3 cups corn
2 cups stock
Mayonaise
Crema Mexicana
Powdered chile
1 lime (cut in half)
1 cup crumbled cotija cheese

Directions: Mix the corn, stock, mayo and cream; sprinkle with the cheese, powdered chili and a squeeze of lime juice.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Stanley Tucci's Cookbook

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Actor Stanely Tucci talks about how his roles in food-centered films such as Big Night and Julie & Julia and his own childhood in an Italian family kitchen helped him develop a love of food and cooking. He’s now written The Tucci Cookbook, which features nearly 200 recipes, with wine pairings.

Comments [7]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Globavores: Corn

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

We continue our exploration of the foods of the Columbian Exchange with a look at corn, which has become a staple of modern agriculture. Betty Fussell, author of The Story of Corn, explains how the grain has changed the way the world eats. We'll also look at how corn is used in a variety of Mexican dishes with Zarela Martinez, author of numerous cookbooks including Zarela's Veracruz

Recipe:Zarela's Pimpo

Recipe: Zarela's Esquites

Corn Recipes from Listeners

Share your corn recipes below!


Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Melissa Clark on Fall Cooking

Thursday, October 04, 2012

New York Times Dining Section columnist and cookbook writer Melissa Clark shares some ideas for enjoying fall’s bountiful produce. Her most recent cookbook is Cook This Now: 120 Easy and Delectable Dishes You Can't Wait to Make.

Comments [19]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Melissa Clark's Carroty Mac and Cheese

Thursday, October 04, 2012

Serves 6

2 cups whole wheat macaroni

2 ½ cups coarsely grated carrots (about 8 small)

3 cups grated sharp Cheddar cheese

¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter, cut into pieces

¾ cup sour cream

¼ cup whole milk

2 large eggs

1 teaspoon kosher salt

¾ teaspoon mustard powder

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

¼ cup finely grated Parmesan cheese

1. Preheat the oven to 400° F and grease an 8-inch-square baking pan. Arrange a rack in the top third of the oven.

2. Cook the macaroni according to the package instructions in a large pot of boiling salted water. Add the carrots 3 minutes before the pasta is finished cooking; drain well.

3. While the pasta is hot, stir in all but ½ cup of the Cheddar and the butter. In a bowl, whisk together the sour cream, milk, eggs, salt, mustard powder, and pepper. Fold the mixture into the pasta.

4. Scrape the mixture into the prepared pan. Sprinkle the remaining Cheddar and the Parmesan over the top. Bake until the casserole is firm to the touch and golden brown, about 30 minutes.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Melissa Clark's Celery Salad with Hazelnuts and Parmesan

Thursday, October 04, 2012

Makes 4 Servings

1 cup hazelnuts

1 1/2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

8 large celery stalks with leaves, thinly sliced

2 ounces good parmesan cheese, shaved

1. Preheat the oven to 350° F. Spread hazelnuts in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Toast, tossing once halfway through, until nuts are golden, 7 to 10 minutes. Pour the nuts into a clean dish towel and use the towel to rub off some of the skins (do not try to be thorough here, it takes too much time, just get rid of what flakes off easily). Cool and coarsely chop the nuts.

2. In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, salt, and pepper; whisk in the oil. Combine nuts, celery and leaves, and cheese in a large salad bowl. Add vinaigrette and toss gently to combine.

 

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Melissa Clark's Raw Brussels Sprouts Salad with Manchego and Toasted Walnuts

Thursday, October 04, 2012

Time:15 minutes

10 ounces Brussels sprouts (1 container), trimmed

Juice of 1/2 lemon

Coarse sea salt or kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, or more to taste

1 cup chopped toasted walnuts

3/4 cup grated Manchego or young pecorino cheese (or even aged Gruyere)

1. In a food processor using the thinnest slicing disk, slice the Brussels sprouts (they will fall apart into shreds). Or, using a knife, slicing the sprouts as thinly as possible. Put the sprouts in a bowl and toss with the lemon juice and a generous pinch of salt and pepper. Let rest for 5 minutes.

2. Add the olive oil and toss well. Add the walnuts and cheese and toss gently. Taste and adjust seasonings. You can serve this immediately, but it gets better after an hour or so. 

Serves 6

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