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Cheez Whiz Helped Spread Processed Foods. Will It Be Squeezed Out?

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Turns out, the history of Kraft's dull-orange cheese spread says a lot about the processed food industry — and where it might be headed as Kraft and Heinz merge.

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All Things Considered

Not Just Sugary-Sweet, Hard Cider Makes A Comeback

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Cider is the fastest-growing alcoholic beverage in the United States. Much of that growth is driven by big industrial producers, but smaller cider-makers are looking for a larger bite of the apple.

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Making Cheese In The Land Of The Bible: Add Myrrh And A Leap Of Faith

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Spring in the West Bank means Bedouin herders' ewes and nanny goats are full of milk — and cheese making abounds. The traditional method relies on a few simple ingredients and a long cultural memory.

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Guess What Makes The Cut As A 'Smart Snack' In Schools? Hot Cheetos

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Frito-Lay has reformulated Flamin' Hot Cheetos to meet new federal nutrition standards for school snacks. That's been a big hit with school kids, but the rules' creators say the snack is still junk.

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America's Test Kitchen Radio

410: One Way Trip to Mars

Friday, March 27, 2015

Would you like to go to space? Could you face the challenge of leaving your loved ones forever, to spend the rest of your days on an unknown planet? Today, we explore part one of our series, One Way Trip to Mars, by talking to Chris Patil, a Boston-based biologist and scientific writer, about why he wants to go to Mars. We’ll find out what’s hot and what’s not in the world of kitchen gadgets, and we’ll speak with food writer Adam Gopnik about what food might be like for the first inhabitants of Mars. Then we’ll head into the test kitchen to learn how to make the best chocolate chip cookies. And of course, we’ll be taking your calls to answer all of your cooking questions. www.americastestkitchen.com/radio

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Calif. Governor Can't Make It Rain, But Can Make Relief Money Pour

Friday, March 27, 2015

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed his sweeping $1.1 billion emergency drought relief bill Friday. It funds water infrastructure improvements like flood control and aid for farmworkers.

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Did That Restaurant Pass Its Health Inspection? Now Yelp Will Tell You

Friday, March 27, 2015

You might not see health inspection information until you're opening a restaurant's door. But if you're in San Francisco and some other cities, you'll see it when you check out an eatery's Yelp page.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Pesticides, Produce, and Your Health

Friday, March 27, 2015

This week's Please Explain is all about the pesticides used in agriculture, their health effects, and whether buying organic matters.

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Morning Edition

Was Your Seafood Caught By Slaves? AP Uncovers Unsavory Trade

Friday, March 27, 2015

Some of the seafood that winds up in American grocery stores, in restaurants, even in cat food, may have been caught by Burmese slaves, a yearlong investigation by The Associated Press finds.

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Think Nobody Wants To Buy Ugly Fruits And Veggies? Think Again

Thursday, March 26, 2015

As much as a third of the produce grown on some farms is rejected because it doesn't meet beauty standards. But it's still tasty and healthy. One big firm is now telling growers: Give us your uglies.

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The Greene Space

On-Demand Video: The Taiwanese Table: Cuisine and Identity

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Cathy Erway talks with Brian Tsao, Ken Ho and Matt Gross about the food of contemporary Taiwan, and Taiwanese food in America. 

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Is Colorado Primed To Become The Silicon Valley Of Agriculture?

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Colorado's food and ag industries have been growing two to four times faster than the state's economy overall. The state's economists are ever more hopeful about cornering the market on ag innovation.

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How Snobbery Helped Take The Spice Out Of European Cooking

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Complex, contrasting flavors are a hallmark of Indian cooking. They used to dominate Western food, too. What changed? When spices became less exclusive, Europe's elite revamped their cuisines.

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All Things Considered

Heinz And Kraft: Before They Were Food Giants, They Were Men

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Henry Heinz was big into pickles before ketchup came along. James Kraft gave the world American cheese. (Ironically, he was Canadian.) Now, two companies that revamped how we eat will become one.

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All Things Considered

Kraft, Heinz Merger Brings Together Famous Food Brands

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

The pending $45 billion merger between Kraft and Heinz will create the world's fifth-largest food company. The deal comes as Kraft struggles to keep up with changing consumer tastes.

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Arsenic In California Wines: Should Drinkers Be Concerned?

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

A recent lawsuit raises a red flag about traces of arsenic in some lower-cost California wines. But, by Canadian standards, the trace levels are acceptable.

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Meet The Cool Beans Designed To Beat Climate Change

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Researchers in Colombia have created new types of beans that can withstand high heat. Many of these "heat-beater" beans resulted from a unique marriage, 20 years ago, of tradition and technology.

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Morning Edition

Vanilla, Nutmeg Spice And Everything Nice On A Zanzibar Farm

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Three spices that grow on the island of Zanzibar are so common they might be flavoring your morning cup of coffee. But vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg have very different origins.

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All Things Considered

'The Katering Show' Reflects The Plight Of Food Intolerance

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

NPR's Robert Siegel talks to Kate McLennan and Kate McCartney, hosts of the video series "The Katering Show," about where they find the humor in food and food television shows.

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A Top Weedkiller Could Cause Cancer. Should We Be Scared?

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

A respected scientific group says that glyphosate, also known as Roundup, is "probably carcinogenic to humans." Yet the actual risks — which are mainly to farmers, not consumers — remain uncertain.

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