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New Jersey News

Sandy Victims Get 6 More Months to File FEMA Docs

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

After pressure from a number of lawmakers, FEMA announced on Tuesday that it will grant an additional six month extension for Sandy survivors to file Proof of Loss statements, which are the first step in appealing a flood insurance settlement.

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The Takeaway

Colorado Floods: The Rescue Efforts and the Challenges Ahead

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Severe flooding and mudslides in Colorado have led to at least five deaths, as well as the destruction or damage of nearly 20,000 homes across 15 counties. Heather Hansen, a resident of Boulder, CO currently staying in Ft. Collins and author of "Disappearing Destinations," a book about environmental damage around the world, joins The Takeaway to discuss the challenges ahead.

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On Being

David Montgomery — Reading the Rocks: Flood Stories and Deep Time

Thursday, August 01, 2013

David Montgomery reads rocks for a living, and he reveals the fascinating interplay between sacred stories and the stories landscapes proclaim across the ages. He set out to debunk Noah’s Flood, and instead found a richer and more interesting history.

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On Being

[Unedited] David Montgomery with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 01, 2013

David Montgomery reads rocks for a living, and he reveals the fascinating interplay between sacred stories and the stories landscapes proclaim across the ages. He set out to debunk Noah’s Flood, and instead found a richer and more interesting history.

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New Jersey News

Still Flood-Prone, Hoboken Braces for Rainy Week

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

With more heavy rains in the forecast this week, flood-prone Hoboken is on high alert.

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The Takeaway

Midwestern Farmer on this Year's Record Floods

Thursday, April 25, 2013

As the city of Boston has picks up the pieces from last weeks’ bombings, and Texas struggles with droughts and the aftermath of explosions, the Midwest has been facing some of the worst flooding they’ve ever seen.

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WNYC News

Causes of Sandy Flooding Rooted in Over Development

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

WNYC

New Jersey officials, led by Governor Chris Christie, have repeatedly cited the state's "Blue Acres" program  as a viable option for dealing with neighborhoods that were badly flooded in storms Sandy and Irene. The program buys property from homeowners and converts the area to a park. But for the thousands of New Jersey residents looking for a buyout, Blue Acres might as well be a unicorn.

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Transportation Nation

Report: National Weather Service Says NJ Transit Didn't Ask About Flooding

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Hoboken Terminal, post-Sandy (photo by NJ Transit via flickr)

The National Weather Service says New Jersey Transit didn't call.

The Star-Ledger is reporting the agency never consulted the National Weather Service, which predicted storm surges of up to 11 feet.

But NJ Transit isn't backpedaling from its costly decision to store rail cars in yards that later flooded during storm Sandy.

NJ Transit director James Weinstein told a State Legislative panel Monday the agency relied on weather reports and past storm experience to determine where to store hundreds of rail cars and locomotives.

The transit agency's Kearny facility, which sustained almost $100 million in damage, is only ten feet above sea level.

Weinstein told lawmakers the agency's decision-making process was sound.

New Jersey Transit says it's standing by his testimony.

To see what areas flooded during Sandy, check out the map below.

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Transportation Nation

Sea Walls, Wetlands, and Porous Streets: Designing a Storm-Proof New York City

Monday, November 12, 2012

Storm damage in Sea Gate, Brooklyn (photo courtesy of NYC Mayor's Office Photo/ Edward Reed)

Would a $20 billion sea wall, stretching from Sandy Hook to the Rockaways, have prevented damage done to New York by Hurricane Sandy's storm surge?

Engineer Fletcher Griffis, speaking on Monday's Brian Lehrer Show, says yes -- "but gosh knows what it will do to the ecology in New York Bay."

Other ideas kicked around during the interview: porous roadways that could reduce flooding,  increased wetlands, and "soft" solutions like zoning changes and ending subsidies for flood insurance.

Listen to the interview below. And check out a data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau about population growth near the coastline.

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Transportation Nation

VIDEO: How To Drain and Repair a Flooded Subway Tunnel

Wednesday, November 07, 2012

Hurricane Sandy flooded all eight under-river subway tunnels in New York (nine if you count the G train, which runs under the Newtown Creek). The last one to have been pumped dry is the L train's 14th Street tunnel, which runs under the East River between Manhattan and Queens and cuts through the population-accreting neighborhoods of Williamsburg and Bushwick, Brooklyn.

The MTA has said restoring L service is its highest priority. On Wednesday, it released a video of workers repairing tracks and signals. Watch it below.

Earlier this week, MTA chairman Joe Lhota described for WNYC the process of restoring service on flooded lines. Workers, he said, are “cleaning [signals] by hand, literally. First you had to pump out the water, then you had to wipe down the mud that was left down there, then you had to literally wipe down the rail, and then fix each and every one of the switches by cleaning them and making sure there was no salt to prevent the electric conductivity.”

You can listen to that interview here.

The L train tunnel on the afternoon of Monday, November 5. (Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Patrick Cashin)

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Transportation Nation

PHOTOS: Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

We’ll be updating this throughout the day. Send your photos to transponation@gmail.com or @transportnation.  ‘Cause we’d like to share them.

1:3opm: broken traffic light at King Street and Varick Street in lower Manhattan (photo by Kate Hinds)

10:27: from Jim O'Grady: "World Trade Center. Cop said PATH station flooded, didn't know how badly. My guess: badly."

10:11am: A beheaded subway entrance. (photo by Jim O'Grady)

10:11am: Staten Island Railway's Clifton Shop in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. (Photo by MTA via flickr)

9:55am: flooding at the entrance to the Hugh L. Carey (formerly Brooklyn Battery) Tunnel, via @NYGovCuomo

9:49am: Downed tree in Tribeca park (photo by Jim O'Grady)

8:14am: Rainbows over Brooklyn (photo by Andrea Bernstein)

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Transportation Nation

Hurricane Irene Damage Amplified by Decades of Bad Infrastructure Policy

Thursday, September 01, 2011

A flooded street in downtown Millburn, New Jersey

WNYC's Bob Hennelly writes in his latest Stucknation blog post that global warming, combined with years of bad infrastructure policy, has set the table for the type of massive flood damage 13 states experienced this week.

"The scope of the damage of these short-sighted landuse practices that play out at the local level have become so pernicious the results can be seen from space...Can we learn these lessons or are we doomed to just keep repeating the same failed behavior? Connecting these dots are  our 21st century WPA scale challenge."

You can read his post here.

And you can listen to Bob discuss America's infrastructure policy on this morning's The Takeaway.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Federal Flood Insurance

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Leslie Scism, Wall Street Journal staff reporter and news editor, talks about the debate in Congress over reauthorizing the federal flood insurance program.

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Features

Farms Struggle to Assess Damage Caused by Tropical Storm Irene

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Tropical Storm Irene officially left the area on Sunday. But farmers, like Cheryl Rogowski, who owns a 150-acre farm in Orange County, are just beginning to assess the damage that the storm has wrought on their crops.

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The Takeaway

Irene Leaves Cities Flooded In Its Wake

Monday, August 29, 2011

Hurricane Irene left neighborhoods, towns and cities flooded along the eastern seaboard. Philadelphia was one of the worst hit in terms of floods, with bodies of water like the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers climbing to ten feet or more above normal levels. States like New Jersey and Vermont are also experiencing Irene-triggered floods.

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WNYC News

Flash Flood Watch In Tri-State Area Follows Record Rainfall

Monday, August 15, 2011

A day after record-setting rainfall fell on New York City, a flash flood watch has been issued for the tri-state area until 9 p.m. Monday. Records were shattered by 5 p.m. Sunday, when 7.6 inches had fallen at JFK Airport — the most ever recorded there in a single day.

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The Takeaway

Natural Disasters Cost US $32 Billion in 2011 So Far

Monday, June 27, 2011

Though we're only halfway through 2011, natural disasters have already cost the U.S. $32 billion, and that number will continue to climb. Over the weekend, the Suris River crested in Minot, North Dakota, leaving 4,000 homes underwater. Fewer than 400 residents of the city—the state's fourth largest—have flood insurance. North Dakota has the lowest unemployment rate in the U.S., and one of the fastest growing economies. 

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The Takeaway

Historic Floods Ravage North Dakota

Thursday, June 23, 2011

The Souris River, which loops from Saskatchewan, Canada to North Dakota, has risen to record high levels and is spilling into the North Dakota city of Minot, causing more than 11,000 residents from there to evacuate for the second time this month. The flooding is said to have been caused by a heavy spring snow melt and heavy rains. The last major flood in the area occurred in 1969, which prompted the construction of levees. But this flood is five feet taller than the 1969 flood, and the levees are unable to contain it. 

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The Takeaway

Mississippi Flooding Affecting Food Prices

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Although the Mississippi flooding is no where near finished, the economic blow to the region is already very high. Besides the loss to personal and commercial properties, over 100,000 acres of farmlands were flooded on the weekend and grain elevators all along the river are knee deep. The trade commerce that uses the river as a main transportation waterway is being slowed and in some places, barges are moored completely. Over 60 percent of the U.S exported grain is transported via the Mississippi - and the already volatile commodity markets are acting accordingly.

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The Takeaway

Memphis Braces for Mississippi Flooding

Monday, May 09, 2011

Memphis, Tennessee is the next place to be hit by the 100-year flood racing south down the Mississippi. About 1,300 households have been evacuated so far, and 500 people have gone to shelters set up around the city in preparation for the 48 foot high crest expected on Tuesday morning before heading further south into Mississippi. Bill Dries, reporter for the Memphis Daily News, who says that Memphis' commerce will take a hit, but that state and local emergency management authorities in Tennessee have been coordinating successfully.

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