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Fine Art

A Woman Uses Art To Come To Terms With Her Father's Death

Monday, May 04, 2015

Artist Jennifer Rodgers' father was hospitalized for seven months with sepsis before he died. She used the creative process to try to comprehend his suffering and her loss.

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Can You Spot The Fake Fragonard?

Saturday, May 02, 2015

A London gallery has asked visitors to spot the single fake, produced for about $100 in China, and displayed among its priceless collection. NPR's Scott Simon reflects on what makes art valuable.

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Sexy, Simple, Satirical: 300 Years Of Picnics In Art

Friday, April 24, 2015

From Goya to Banksy, artists through the centuries have tackled modernity and its discontents through depictions of eating outdoors.

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Lunch With Monet, Dinner With Jackson Pollock

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Two new books focus on the culinary lives of these two artists. Turns out, their approaches to food provide a new way of thinking about their two very different approaches to art.

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Gift Worth $400 Million To Art Institute Of Chicago Includes Works By Warhol

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

The donation was confirmed after the museum agreed to display the 42 paintings, silk-screens and sculptures for the next 50 years.

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Wordless Ads Speak Volumes In 'Unbranded' Images Of Women

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Artist Hank Willis Thomas strips slogans and brands off ads to create images that expose American preoccupations. His last series focused on African-Americans; his new work features white women.

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All Things Considered

Painting The 'Epic Drama' Of The Great Migration: The Work Of Jacob Lawrence

Friday, April 10, 2015

A rare exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art features 60 of Lawrence's paintings about the journey of 6 million African-Americans, who fled the segregated South during the Great Migration.

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All Things Considered

Father Of Modern Iranian Sculpture Gets First U.S. Show In Nearly 40 Years

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

Parviz Tanavoli's calligraphy-inspired figures helped revive sculpture as an art form in Iran. Now, Wellesley College's Davis Museum is giving American viewers a chance to see his work.

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All Things Considered

Why Are Chinese Artists Representing Kenya At The Venice Biennale?

Monday, March 30, 2015

Kenya will participate in the Venice Biennale, the prestigious art show that opens on May 9. But only two of the artists representing Kenya will be Kenyan. Most aren't even African — they're Chinese.

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New Postage Stamps Recognize The Genius Of Martin Ramirez

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Martin Ramirez was a self-taught artist who spent much of his life confined to hospitals, where he began to make remarkable art. Now some of it is featured on a new series of U.S. postage stamps.

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The Chinese 'Paper Son' Who Inspired The Look Of Disney's 'Bambi'

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Tyrus Wong's expressive paintings caught Walt Disney's eye and became the visual guide for Bambi. Born in China, Wong — now 104 — used forged papers to enter the U.S. under the Chinese Exclusion Act.

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The Tale Of Mingering Mike, Who Painted Himself A Music Career

Saturday, March 28, 2015

A self-taught visual artist who longed to make soul records, Mingering Mike ended up realizing his dreams on paper rather than vinyl. Decades later, his work is paying off.

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#NPRreads: From Supreme Court Justice To The Notorious R.B.G.

Friday, March 20, 2015

For your weekend, here are four recommendations: How Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg became an Internet meme, how The Great Wave went viral, a profile of Hugh Hewitt and why 4Chan's founder walked away.

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Morning Edition

This Museum Lets You Play The Artist

Friday, March 20, 2015

The Smithsonian has banned selfie sticks in its museums, but there's a new pro-selfie museum in Manila. It encourages visitors to "be part of art" by posing with 3-D versions of famous artworks.

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Morning Edition

25 Years After Art Heist, Empty Frames Still Hang In Boston's Gardner Museum

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

On March 18, 1990, robbers stole $500 million in art from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Author Stephen Kurkjian explains why anyone would bother to steal work so priceless it couldn't be sold.

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All Things Considered

In Detroit's Rivera And Kahlo Exhibit, A Portrait Of A Resilient City

Monday, March 16, 2015

This is the first exhibit to focus on the time Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo spent in Detroit. It's a big step for the Detroit Institute of Arts as it recovers from the tumult of the city's bankruptcy.

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A Travel Show For Your Favorite Weird-Museum And Dance Enthusiast

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Ovation's American Canvas has a lot of fun in San Francisco, starting with the art installation at Alcatraz.

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Morning Edition

Meet Joseph Duveen, The Savvy Art Dealer Who Sold European Masterpieces

Monday, March 09, 2015

Duveen once observed: "Europe has a great deal of art, and America has a great deal of money." A new exhibit explores the relationship between Duveen and American mega-millionaire Norton Simon.

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TED Radio Hour

Should We Be Wary of Algorithms?

Friday, March 06, 2015

Our lives are, in part, governed by algorithms. Professor Kevin Slavin shows how these formulas can reshape finance, culture and physical environments, with potentially harmful consequences.

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Morning Edition

Impressionist Hero Edouard Manet Gets The Star Treatment In Los Angeles

Friday, February 27, 2015

Manet was not himself an impressionist, but he mightily influenced the movement. Two of his paintings are now in LA. The Railway is making its West Coast debut, and Spring just sold for $65 million.

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