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Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission

The Brian Lehrer Show

Crisis Lessons: Ask the Chairman

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Phil Angelides, Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission chairman, is a weekly guest for the month of February.  This week he continues to unpack the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission findings on the reasons behind the economic meltdown.  

→  Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country!

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Lessons from the Crisis: Ask the Chairman

Thursday, February 24, 2011

WNYC
I will tell you this, if unemployment stays high, if for the foreclosure trend in this country stays steady, it will be a consistent drag and of course these all have ripple effects… all these are continuing threats both to the economy and the financial system. I don’t think we’re out of the woods by any means at this point in time.

Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission Chairman Phil Angelides on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Crisis Lessons: Fannie and Freddie

Thursday, February 17, 2011

On the Brian Lehrer Show today at 11:25 am. Audio and a recap of this conversation will be posted here by 1pm.

Phil Angelides, Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission chairman is the monthly guest for February. Each week he unpacks the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission findings on the economic meltdown. This week he discusses the role of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in the lead-up to the housing bubble and bust.

Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's a Free Country!

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Aftershocks of the Financial Crisis

Thursday, February 10, 2011

I believe we need to be much more aggressive in trying to help people who can make a level of payments stay in their homes… We have created a tangled web and I believe we need much more forceful action.

— Phil Angelides, Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission chairman on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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Stucknation: Disclosure, Democracy, and the Federal Reserve

Monday, January 31, 2011

In Tunisia, Wikileaks’ disclosures of State Department cables describing the self-dealing  of former Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali's regime greased the skids for his exit. Sunlight may be a great antiseptic, but it is also a lubricant to move stuck history right along.

In a few days, the passion of the Tunisian Jasmine Revolution had swept across the Maghreb as far east as Egypt, touching down in Yemen and even the Sudan. The whole world watched as long-suffering people were inspired to put their life on the line to make their own history.

Nowhere has there been a greater need for Wikileaks than at the Federal Reserve. The Fed was created by an act of Congress in 1913 to regulate banking, but it has long been a captive of that industry.

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Financial Crisis: Where's the Outrage?

Thursday, January 27, 2011

In 2008, the bubble popped. The financial crisis sent our economy swirling into chaos and pushed us into this Great Recession. Many Americans lost faith in our private institutions that caused this mess and in our public institutions that should have seen it coming. The fallout shined a light on the double-dealing shell game being played by our financial giants. Unfortunately, they weren’t playing with Monopoly money. The high stakes had high costs: a devastating spike in unemployment, a national foreclosure crisis based on mortgage fraud and depleted pensions and retirement accounts for working Americans.

At least those whose reckless — and potentially criminal — gambles drove us into this ditch got what they had coming…bonuses, a light reprimand and carte blanche to do it all again.

It’s enough to make you so angry you’d consider dumping tea in Boston Harbor.

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Open Thread: The FCIC Says Who's to Blame for the Financial Crisis

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

WNYC

On Thursday morning, the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission released its final report to the president and the public on the causes of the 2008 financial crisis.

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