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Fiction

The Leonard Lopate Show

Frontline's "To Catch a Trader"; Chang-Rae Lee's New Novel; Gary Shteyngart; 2014 Winter Jazzfest

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

Frontline correspondent Martin Smith talks about his investigation into Steven A. Cohen and his firm, SAC Capital. Chang-Rae Lee talks about his new novel, On Such a Full Sea, set in a future America that strictly stratified by class. Gary Shteyngart discusses his memoir, Little Failure, about leaving the Soviet Union for the United States in the late 1970s. We’ll get a preview of the 10th annual Winter Jazz Fest with composer and musician Henry Threadgill and pianist Jason Moran.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Sue Monk Kidd's New Novel, The Invention of Wings

Monday, January 06, 2014

Sue Monk Kidd discusses her new novel, The Invention of Wings. It's about Handful, a slave in early 19th-century Charleston who yearns for life beyond the wealthy Grimke household where she works, and the Grimke’s daughter, Sarah, who is given ownership of Handful.

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On Being

Marilynne Robinson and Marcelo Gleiser — The Mystery We Are [remix]

Thursday, January 02, 2014

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On Being

[Unedited] Marilynne Robinson and Marcelo Gleiser with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 02, 2014

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Amy Tan's The Valley of Amazement

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Amy Tan discusses her latest novel, The Valley of Amazement. It spans more than 40 years and two continents, and resurrects pivotal episodes in history: from the collapse of China’s last imperial dynasty to the rise of the Republic, the explosive growth of lucrative foreign trade and anti-foreign sentiment to the inner workings of courtesan houses and the lives of foreign  “Shanghailanders," both erased by World War II.

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Selected Shorts

Hear Some (Slightly) Magical Short Stories

Friday, December 27, 2013

Guest host Robert Sean Leonard presents three kind-of-magical tales and one true love story, featuring works by James Thurbur, Alice Hoffman and Rita Dove.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Permanent Member of the Family, by Russell Banks

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Russell Banks discusses his new collection of short stories, A Permanent Member of the Family. The 12 stories in the collection examine the ways we try—and sometimes fail—to connect with one another. Banks looks at the families we make for ourselves and the ones we're born into.

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The Takeaway

"The Luminaries" Lights Up the Literary Skies

Thursday, December 19, 2013

"The Luminaries" is the fascinating new novel written by Eleanor Catton, the 2013 Man Booker Prize winner. Described by the New York Times as "doing a Charlotte Bronte-Themed crossword puzzle while playing chess and Dance Dance Revolution on a Bongo Board," the novel is wildly unique. Catton is the youngest person to win the Prize and only the second to win from New Zealand, and she joins The Takeaway to discuss the wild wave of enthusiasm for her work.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Graeme Simsion's Novel The Rosie Project

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Graeme Simsion talks about his debut novel, The Rosie Project, about a brilliant yet socially challenged professor of genetics who designs the Wife Project to find his perfect partner. He meets Rosie Jarman, and while he disqualifies her as a candidate for the Wife Project, he helps Rosie on her own quest: identifying her biological father. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jonathan Miles on Want Not, His New Novel

Monday, December 09, 2013

Jonathan Miles talks about his latest comic novel, Want Not. It opens on Thanksgiving Day, and presents three characters in various states of disrepair—a young freegan couple living off the grid in New York City; a once-prominent linguist, dealing with the dissolution of his marriage and his father’s battle with Alzheimer’s; and a self-made debt-collecting magnate with a trophy wife.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Martin Cruz Smith on Tatiana, his Latest Novel

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

Martin Cruz Smith talks about his new novel, Tatiana, featuring Arkady Renko, one of the iconic inves­tigators of contemporary fiction. Renko has survived the cultural journey from the Soviet Union to the New Russia, only to find the nation as obsessed with secrecy and brutality as was the old Communist dictatorship.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Extremely Creative Writing

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

A writers' model, Alex Karpovsky reads some extremely creative writing by Etgar Keret, Joan Didion tells us how she did it, TC Boyle dates Jane Austen.

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Radiolab

The Iceman Speaks

Friday, November 22, 2013

Stefan Merrill Block, a novelist and friend of our show, reads his haunting short story from the perspective of Ötzi the Iceman (the mysterious figure at the center of our latest short, An Ice-Cold Case).

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Twenty-Seventh City, by Jonathan Franzen

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Jonathan Franzen has been called one of the most important living fiction writers in America. We’re going back to his very first novel.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Tributes: Doris Lessing

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

When Doris Lessing was confronted by a bunch of reporters outside her home in London one day in 2007, and was told she'd just won the Nobel Prize, she retorted, "Oh, Christ!...  I couldn't care less." The outspoken, independent, and sometimes irascible author reinvented herself over the course of novels, short stories, essays and poems, whether drawing upon her childhood spent in the Central African bush, or imagining a dystopian future.  It was The Golden Notebook, her 1962 novel, though, that brought her the most acclaim. She died recently at the age of 94.  You can hear her distinctive voice in an interview with Leonard from 2003 below.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Russell Banks on A Permanent Member of the Family

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Russell Banks discusses his new collection of short stories, A Permanent Member of the Family. The 12 stories in the collection examine the ways we try—and sometimes fail—to connect with one another. Banks looks at the families we make for ourselves and the ones we're born into.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Where Recycling Goes; the Musical "The Landing"; Russell Banks's New Short Stories; Homelessness in NYC

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Adam Minter describes what happens to our soda cans, glass bottles,and old newspapers after they’re put out on the curb, and how recycling became a global industry. Composer John Kander and lyricist Greg Pierce on their new musical, “The Landing.” Russell Banks talks about his new collection of short stories. And New Yorker staff writer Ian Frazier and Coalition for the Homeless president Mary Brosnahan discuss why homelessness in New York has reached such high numbers.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Quiet Dell, by Jayne Anne Philips

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Jayne Anne Philips talks about her new novel, Quiet Dell, which is based on a real-life multiple murder by a con man who preyed on widows— a story that has haunted the author for more than four decades. 

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Amy Tan's Novel The Valley of Amazement

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

Amy Tan discusses her latest novel, The Valley of Amazement. It spans more than 40 years and two continents, and resurrects pivotal episodes in history: from the collapse of China’s last imperial dynasty to the rise of the Republic, the explosive growth of lucrative foreign trade and anti-foreign sentiment to the inner workings of courtesan houses and the lives of foreign  “Shanghailanders," both erased by World War II.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Bonnie Raitt; Nico Muhly's Two Boys; Amy Tan's New Novel; the Birth of Twitter

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

Bonnie Raitt tells us about her career, launching her own label, and winning her tenth Grammy Award for her latest album, Slipstream. Composer Nico Muhly and singer Paul Appleby talk about the new opera Two Boys, which made its American debut at the Metropolitan Opera last month. Amy Tan on her latest novel, The Valley of Amazement. Nick Bilton of the New York Times discusses the launch of Twitter and how the site’s quick rise in popularity sowed the seeds for power struggles.