Streams

 

Fiction

The Leonard Lopate Show

Miss Timmins’ School for Girls

Monday, August 08, 2011

Nayana Currimbhoy discusses her novel Miss Timmins’ School for Girls, set in a British boarding school in the hills of western India in the 1970s. Running from a scandal that disgraced her Brahmin family, Charulata Apte arrives at Miss Timmins' School for Girls in Panchgani to teach Shakespeare. It’s here that Charu's real education begins.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underappreciated: David Markson's Wittgenstein’s Mistress

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

This summer's second Underappreciated segment looks at David Markson's 1988 novel Wittgenstein’s Mistress, which David Foster Wallace called “pretty much the high point of experimental fiction in this country.” Ann Beattie, longtime admirer and friend of David Markson, and Françoise Palleau-Papin, professor of American Literature at the University of Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle), discuss Markson's work.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

The Extraordinary Life of Mrs. Tom Thumb

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

International celebrity culture often feels like a very modern phenomenon, but the concept was not foreign to society in the 1860s, when there was one couple everybody wanted to meet: General Tom Thumb and his wife, Lavinia Warren. Both were famous because of their short stature — Lavinia was just 32 inches tall — and they toured the country as "curiosities." Their wedding in 1863 caused a national sensation that extended as far as the White House, where President Abraham Lincoln hosted a reception in their honor. Tom Thumb is now a household name, though most people have never heard of Lavinia. 

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Hangman’s Daughter

Tuesday, August 02, 2011

Oliver Pötzsch discusses his novel, The Hangman’s Daughter, set in 17th-century Bavaria. It tells the story of Magdalena, the headstrong daughter of Bavarian hangman Jakob Kuisl, who must race against the clock to prove that a midwife accused of witchcraft and murder is innocent, and simultaneously find the true killer.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underappreciated: Theodor Fontane’s Effi Briest and Irretrievable

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

This summer’s first Underappreciated segment is on 19th-century Realist writer Theodor Fontane. Professor Edith H. Krause, Professor of German and Chair of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at Duquesnes University, discusses Fontane’s best known works—his 1896 novel Effi Briest, considered a masterpiece of realist fiction alongside Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina, and his 1892 novel Irretrievable, which was recently re-published by New York Review of Books.

Comments [4]

Features

Titan Books to Publish Mickey Spillane Crime Novels

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Gumshoe fans got some good news this week. Titan Books has plans to publish three unfinished Mickey Spillane crime novels, all of them starring the hard-boiled vigilante P.I. Mike Hammer.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Chris Adrian’s novel The Great Night

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Chris Adrian describes his novel The Great Night, a mesmerizing retelling of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Esmeralda Santiago's Conquistadora

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Esmeralda Santiago talks about her epic novel, Conquistadora, about a Spanish woman, Ana Larragoity Cubillas, who moves to Puerto Rico with her new husband in 1844 to run a remote sugar plantation on the island. There she faces unrelenting heat, disease and isolation, and the dangers of the untamed countryside.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Adam Ross on Ladies and Gentlemen

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Adam Ross describes his darkly compelling collection of stories about brothers, loners, lovers, and lives full of good intentions, misunderstandings, and obscured motives, Ladies and Gentlemen, the follow-up to his celebrated debut novel, Mr. Peanut.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rebecca Wolff’s The Beginners

Friday, July 15, 2011

Rebecca Wolff tells us about her new novel, The Beginners, a chilling story of a girl whose coming of age is darkened by the secret history of her small New England town. She's drawn to a sophisticated, dashing couple new to town, but they may be more than they seem.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Leonard Lopate Show Book Club: Jennifer Egan's Look at Me

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Jennifer Egan joins us to talk about her novel, Look at Me, the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club’s July selection. Look at Me, published in 2001, was a National Book Award finalist, and it explores the American obsession with image and self-invention. A fashion model named Charlotte Swenson suffers injuries in a car accident that leave her face so badly shattered that it takes 80 titanium screws to reassemble it. She is still beautiful but is oddly unrecognizable. Egan intertwines Charlotte’s narrative with the stories of other casualties of our infatuation with image—a teenaged girl starting a dangerous secret life, an alcoholic private eye, and an enigmatic stranger preparing a staggering blow against American society.

We hope you've been reading it! Participate in the conversation! Leave a question for Jennifer Egan below!

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Courtney Sullivan’s Novel, Maine

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Courtney Sullivan discusses her second novel, Maine, about four women who have nothing in common except for the fact that, like it or not, they’re related. Three generations of Kelleher women descend on the family’s beachfront property in Maine one summer, each grappling with their own hopes and fears.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Last Werewolf

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Glen Duncan discusses his new novel, The Last Werewolf. It tells the story of Jake, a 201-year-old werewolf, who is the last of his species and has become deeply distraught and lonely.

Comments [1]

Features

The Leonard Lopate Show Book Club: Arthur Phillips and "The Tragedy of Arthur"

Thursday, July 07, 2011

The idea for the new novel "The Tragedy of Arthur" came to author Arthur Phillips when he was walking down the street and thought to himself: "I wonder if I could write a Shakespeare play." His book is in the form of a memoir that serves as the introduction to an undiscovered play by William Shakespeare.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Sapphire on Her Novel: The Kid

Wednesday, July 06, 2011

Sapphire, author of the novel Push, which became the screenplay for "Precious," talks about her latest novel, The Kid. It tells the story of Abdul Jones, the son of Precious, the heroine of Push, orphaned at 9 and left alone to navigate a violent world in which love and hate sometimes intertwine.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Coming-of-Age with 'In Zanesville'

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

The coming-of-age story is a summer book standard. So many of us remember spending our lazy summer days with Francie from "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn," the March sisters of "Little Women" or Holden Caulfield of "Catcher in the Rye." The next pick for our Summer Book Club furthers this tradition through a uniquely accurate adolescent voice. Jo Ann Beard's "In Zanesville" follows a teenage narrator and her best friend through high school life in 1970s small-town Illinois. The novel is so transfixing, Celeste claimed she couldn't put it down. John finished it and immediately passed it along to his daughters.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Josh Ritter's Bright Passage

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Songwriter Josh Ritter talks about his first novel, Bright’s Passage, and how he made the transition from writing music to writing a book. The novel tells the story of a journey taken by a father and his infant son, guided by a cantankerous goat and an angel.

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

Finding Fiction from the Grim Realities of War: Patricia McArdle's 'Farishta'

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Over our nearly decade-long war in Afghanistan, we've become accustomed to hearing stories of death and destruction—loss of life has become the price of this war. Former Foreign Service officer Patricia McArdle has written a story of re-birth and a second chance at life, based on her time in Afghanistan. Her new novel, "Farishta," tells the story of Angela Morgan, whose husband died in the bombing of the U.S. embassy in Beirut in 1983. After mourning for 20 years, Angela is sent to an isolated British Army compound in Afghanistan, and it's there that she is reborn.

Comment

Three Dark Tales That Serve Up Twisted Delights

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Dive into the creepy-crawly side of literature with author Goldie Goldbloom's recommendations of chilling and disturbed lit. She suggests three gruesomely enchanting books that feature freakish oddities, bizarre love and talking corpses.

Comment

The Takeaway

Nigerian Journalists Explore Environmental Destruction in 'Oil on Water'

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

All summer long we’re celebrating the season of relaxing and reading with our book club here at The Takeaway. Some of the novels we'll talk about this summer are escapist in a fantastical way. They’re easy to read and enjoy. Other books are escapist because they are deeply engrossing. They draw us in to a difficult story, making it impossible to look away from the problems the book brings to the surface. Today's book club pick does just that. It’s called "Oil On Water" by Helon Habila. "Oil On Water" tells the story of two journalists who are in pursuit of a scoop in the oil-rich, poverty-stricken Niger Delta.

Comments [1]