Streams

 

Fiction

The Leonard Lopate Show

Orhan Pamuk's Silent House

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Orhan Pamuk talks about his second novel, Silent House, now translated into English for the first time. It tells the story of a Turkish family gathering in the shadow of the impending military coup of 1980, and how the growing political cataclysm issuing from Turkey’s tumultuous century-long struggle for modernity affects the family.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jay Neugeboren's The Other Side of the World

Friday, December 07, 2012

Jay Neugeboren talks about his latest novel, The Other Side of the World. It’s a grand, episodic novel that moves from the lush forests of Borneo to coastal Maine.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Shape We’re In

Friday, December 07, 2012

Economist editor Daniel Franklin details the most pressing issues the world faces in 2013. Then Rupert Holmes, who wrote the book, music, and lyrics for “The Mystery of Edwin Drood,” will be here along with two of the play’s stars: Jim Norton and Jessie Mueller. Jay Neugeboren talks about his latest novel, The Other Side of the World. And, mark the date! Because today’s Please Explain is all about calendars.

Slate Culture Gabfest

The Culture Gabfest: Uniball Vision Elite Edition

Tuesday, December 04, 2012

Slate critics Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens and Julia Turner discuss the end of handwriting and Philip Hensher's book "The Missing Ink," Nassim Nicholas Taleb's book "Antifragile" and the idea of "neomania," and Slate's June Thomas stops by to explain why

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

A. M. Homes on May We Be Forgiven

Friday, November 30, 2012

A. M. Homes discusses her new novel, May We Be Forgiven. It’s a darkly comic novel of 21st-century suburban domestic life and the possibility of personal transformation.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: A. M. Homes

Friday, November 30, 2012

A. M. Homes was here to talk about her latest novel. She shares a few of her favorite things.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Dark and Light

Friday, November 30, 2012

On today’s show: We’ll find out about the complicated and often misunderstood history of Afghanistan. The director and two of the stars of a new production of “The Piano Lesson,” the fourth play in August Wilson’s epic Century Cycle. A. M. Homes talks about May We Be Forgiven, her new dark-comic novel about 21st century suburban life. Please Explain is all about mold!

The Takeaway

Fiction or Non-Fiction? A Veteran Journalist Explains Why He Ventured into Fiction

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Yesterday's segment about new curriculum guidelines that would replace some beloved novels with non-fiction reading in K-12 classrooms sparked a lot of responses listener responses about the virtues of fiction and non-fiction. What's more important for a high school education: fiction reading or non-fiction reading?

Today, a veteran journalist who ventured into fiction after a storied career in the world of non-fiction weighs in. Jeff Greenfield is the author of "Then Everything Changed."

Comments [6]

On The Media

No Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

Friday, November 23, 2012

This year, for the first time in 35 years, there was no Pulitzer Prize awarded for fiction.  Was it a bad year for novels? Is the Pulitzer selection process broken? Is it a dire sign of things to come for the fiction industry?  Author, Salon senior writer and past Pulitzer fiction judge Laura Miller explains to Bob which way to read the Pulitzer’s non-award.

Papa Razzi and the Photogs - I Like the Books of Jane Austen

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Emma Straub’s Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures

Friday, November 23, 2012

Emma Straub talks about her novel, Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures, a story of a Midwestern girl who escapes a family tragedy and is remade as a movie star during Hollywood’s golden age.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Video: Questions for Tom Wolfe

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

The author of The Bonfire of the Vanities and the new novel Back to Blood sings a little, praises Michael Lewis, and cringes at the word issues.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Susanna Moore's The Life of Objects

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Susanna Moore talks about her new novel, The Life of Objects. It’s about a 17-year-old Irish woman who joins the Berlin household of Felix and Dorothea Metzenburg. Art collectors, and friends to the most fascinating men and women in Europe, the Metzenburgs introduce Beatrice to a world in which she finds more to desire than she ever imagined. But the threat of Nazi terror, the deportation and murder of Jews, and the hordes of refugees fleeing the advancing Red Army cast a dark shadow.

Comments [2]

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

James Michener Speculates on Soviet Satellites, the U.S., and 'The Bridge at Andau'

Monday, November 19, 2012

WNYC

Hungary's abortive 1956 revolution provides the subject for this talk given by the journalist and novelist James Michener at a 1957 New York Herald Tribune Books and Authors Luncheon. 

Read More

Comments [2]

Radiolab

Why we fall into a good book

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Writer Jonathan Gottschall explores why the real world falls away when we hear a good story... 

Read More

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

November's Book: The Bonfire of the Vanities, by Tom Wolfe

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Tom Wolfe’s bestselling novel The Bonfire of the Vanities is a portrait of New York in the late 1980s—a city seething with racial tension in Harlem and the Bronx while traders were raking in huge profits on Wall Street. Wolfe’s sharp observations skewer New York society’s greed and arrogance, and highlight the simmering resentment between the haves and have nots. The New York Times Book Review called it “A big, bitter, funny, craftily plotted book that grabs you by the lapels and won’t let go.” Read it now and get your lapels grabbed!  

 

Get the conversation started now by leaving your comments and questions about the book!

Comments [20]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Barbara Kingsolver's Flight Behavior

Monday, November 12, 2012

Barbara Kingsolver discusses her latest novel, Flight Behavior, which takes on one of the most contentious subjects of our time—climate change. In the language of her native Appalachia, Kingsolver unearths the modern complexities of rural existence and dissects the motives behind denial and belief in a precarious world.

Comments [1]

On The Media

What it Means to be "Online"

Friday, November 09, 2012

Last month, Forrester Research reported that people assume they spend less time online than they actually do because the way people understand what it means to be "online" is changing. On the Media producer Alex Goldman talks about our changing relationship with being online and how fiction has imagined us reaching this point for decades. 

Slade - Cum on Feel the Noize

Comments [1]

Features

Witchcraft: A Halloween Talk with Deborah Harkness

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

It’s nearly Halloween, so soon the streets will be thronged with superheroes and pirates and princesses and politicians.  And, of course, witches and vampires.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Try the Morgue: An Inside Look at the World of Arms Trafficking

Friday, October 19, 2012

Since the '80s, Eva Maria Staal (not her real name) has sold weapons in Chechnya, Pakistan, China and beyond. Her work, while legal, frequently brought her in close contact with all kinds of underworld figures — from drug dealers to child and sex traffickers. Her debut novel “Try the Morgue,” draws on these experiences. 

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

October's Book: Cloud Atlas, by David Mitchell

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

David Mitchell, two-time finalist for the Booker Prize, joins us to talk about his 2004 novel Cloud Atlas. The story is told through six separate but related narratives, each set in a different time and place, and written in a different style. Novelist Michael Chabon called it “not just dazzling, amusing, or clever but heartbreaking and passionate, too.”

If you have a question for David Mitchell, leave a comment below! 

Comments [17]