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Fiction

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Blind Man’s Garden, by Nadeem Aslam

Thursday, May 02, 2013

Nadeem Aslam discusses The Blind Man’s Garden, his new novel set in Pakistan and Afghanistan in the months following 9/11. It’s a story about two foster brothers from a small town in Pakistan who were inseparable as children but whose adult lives have diverged. When one decides to sneak across the border into Afghanistan to help care for wounded civilians, the other decides to go with him to protect him.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Lead Wars, Hem Performs Live, Mars Rover, Nadeem Aslam's New Novel

Thursday, May 02, 2013

We’ll find out how the effort to protect children from lead poisoning became one of the most contentious and bitter battles in the history of public health. The Brooklyn-based band Hem perform songs form their new album “Departure and Farewell.” Adam Steltzner, the leader of the Mars Rover’s entry, descent, and landing team, and New Yorker staff writer Burkhard Bilger discuss the Mars Rover and the future of NASA. And Nadeem Aslam talks about his latest novel, The Blind Man’s Garden.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Wall Street Manipulation, Chuck Close, Jessica Soffer's Novel, Jeremy Scahill on Covert War

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi talks about whether bankers and brokers manipulated the market rates that affect global borrowing costs. Chuck Close describes the process of using large-scale Polaroid photographs to create his paintings. Jessica Soffer discusses her novel called Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots. The Nation’s Jeremy Scahill talks about America’s covert wars and the elite soldiers who operate in more than 100 countries around the world.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jessica Soffer's Novel, Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Jessica Soffer discusses her novel Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots. It’s the story of two women adrift in New York, a widow and an almost-orphan, each searching for someone she’s lost. They’re brought together through cooking, and begin to suspect they are connected by more than their love of food.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rachel Kushner's Novel The Flame Throwers

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Rachel Kushner talks about her novel, The Flame Throwers, the story of a young artist and the worlds she encounters in New York and Rome in the mid-1970s—by turns underground, elite, and dangerous. She falls in with members of the radical movement that overtook Italy in the 1970s.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

April's Book: Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Translated by Lydia Davis

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Madame Bovary, one of the most celebrated novels ever written, defined the novel as an art form when it was published in 1875. Lydia Davis’s landmark translation of Flaubert’s work breathes new life into it. When it was first published, Madame Bovary was embraced by bourgeois women who felt it illuminated the frustrations of their lives. It tells the story of Emma Rouault, whose dreams of a passionate life crumble when she marries a dull, provincial doctor Charles Bovary. She struggles to escape the tedium of her days as a wife and mother. She has a series of disappointing affairs and spends money getting into debt, with tragic consequences for her husband and daughter.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Nathaniel Rich on Odds Against Tomorrow

Monday, April 15, 2013

Nathaniel Rich talks about his new novel, Odds Against Tomorrow. It’s set in New York City in the near future and follows Mitchell Zukor, a gifted young mathematician hired by a mysterious new financial consulting firm, FutureWorld, to calculate worst-case scenarios in intricate detail.

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The Truth

Falling

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

A freak accident on a train platform leads to... romance? Performed by Chet Siegel and Peter McNerney, with Willy Appleman, Louis Kornfeld, Lauren Ashley-Smith, Sebastien Conelli, Quinton Loder, Jon Bander, and Kim Ferguson. Written by Chet Siegel and...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jennifer Gilmore's Novel The Mothers

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Jennifer Gilmore talks about her latest novel, The Mothers, the story of one couple’s ardent desire for a child and their emotional journey through adoption.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Meg Wolitzer's Novel The Interestings

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

Meg Wolitzer discusses her new novel, The Interestings, a panoramic story about what becomes of early talent, and the roles that art, money, and even envy can play in close friendships. It follows a group of teenagers who met at summer camp in the 1970s into adulthood.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Toms River, Music Icon Paul Anka, Novelist Meg Wolitzer, Conflict in Syria

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

Dan Fagin talks about how Toms River, New Jersey, was a dumping ground for cancer-causing industrial pollution for decades. Paul Anka looks back at his life and his career in music, working with everyone from Frank Sinatra to Barnum & Bailey Circus acrobats. Meg Wolitzer talks about her latest novel, called The Interestings. And Olly Lambert discusses his new Frontline documentary about Syria’s civil war—he spent time living on both sides of the conflict.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Magic of Saida, by M. G. Vassanji

Monday, April 01, 2013

M. G. Vassanji discusses his new novel, The Magic of Saida. It tells the story of an African/Indian man who returns to the town of his birth in search of the girl he once loved—and the sense of self that has always eluded him. The novel moves between the past and present, and tells a personal story as well as a broad story of political promise and failure in contemporary Africa.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Immigrants in Solitary Confinement, Lemony Snicket, Small-Scale Philanthropy

Monday, April 01, 2013

New York Times reporter Ian Urbina talks about why U.S. authorities have been putting illegal immigrants in solitary confinement, sometimes for weeks at a time. Lemony Snicket and Jon Klassen discuss collaborating on their new book about that age-old childhood fear, The Dark. M. G. Vassanji tells us about his new novel, The Magic of Saida. Bob Harris explains how he became a philanthropist $10-$15 at a time.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Fever, a Novel about Typhoid Mary

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Mary Beth Keane discusses her new novel, Fever, about the woman known as “Typhoid Mary.” Mary Mallon emigrated from Ireland at age 15 to make her way in New York City. She became a cook for the aristocracy until a “medical engineer” noticed that she left a trail of disease wherever she cooked. The Department of Health sent Mallon to North Brother Island, where she was kept in isolation from 1907 to 1910, then released under the condition that she never work as a cook again.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Public Defenders; Aleksandar Hemon; Typhoid Mary; and Dr. Robert Lustig on Sugar, Fat, and Health

Thursday, March 28, 2013

We’ll look at the current status of public defenders and the legacy of the Supreme Court decision Gideon v. Wainwright. Aleksandar Hemon talks about growing up in Sarajevo, and watching its destruction from Chicago during the Balkan War. Mary Beth Keane discusses her new novel about Typhoid Mary, called Fever. Dr. Robert Lustig explains how the massive amount of sugar we’re consuming has changed our brain chemistry, affecting what—and how much—we eat.

The Leonard Lopate Show

All the Light There Was, a Novel

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Nancy Kricorian talks about her novel, All the Light There Was, which tells the story of an Armenian family’s struggle to survive the Nazi occupation of Paris in the 1940s. An Armenian family who survived the genocide in their homeland have come to Paris to build a new life. But the Nazi’s arrive, and the family realizes that the occupation is not simply a temporary outrage to be endured.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Bo Xilai and Corruption in China, Bach 360, a Novel set in Vichy France, Animal Drones

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

We’ll look at the recent downfall of Bo Xilai and how it revealed a major power struggle within the Chinese Communist Party. Graham Parker and pianist Simone Dinnerstein talk about WQXR’s Bach 360 festival and about Dinnerstein’s performance of the Goldberg Variations. Nancy Kricorian talks about her novel, All the Light There Was, about an Armenian family’s struggle to survive in Vichy France. And we'll find about insects and animals engineered to be drones!

The Leonard Lopate Show

Taiye Selasi's Novel Ghana Must Go

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Taiye Selasi discusses her novel Ghana Must Go, a portrait of a modern family and an exploration of the importance of where we come from to who we are. It’s a sweeping narrative that takes us from Accra to Lagos to London to New York. When a renowned surgeon and failed husband dies in Accra, the scattered family he abandoned years before comes together again.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Abuse at Horace Mann, Growing Up in Alaska, the Novel Ghana Must Go, Waste and Fraud in the NSA.

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

The New Yorker contributor and Horace Mann graduate Marc Fisher talks about the shocking allegations of sexual abuse at the elite prep school. Then, one woman’s memoir of splitting her childhood between the wilds of Alaska and urban wilds of Baltimore. Taiye Selasi talks about her novel, Ghana Must Go.The Nation’s Tim Shorrock on what’s happened to the  men who blew the whistle on the waste and fraud they saw in the NSA’s system to intercept communications before 9/11.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mackenzie Bezos on Her Novel Traps

Thursday, March 21, 2013

American Book Award winner Mackenzie Bezos discusses her new novel, Traps. It tells the story of how the paths of four very different women intersect, briefly but significantly, in ways that will change each of them forever.

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