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Fcc

The Takeaway

GOP Senator: FCC Ruling on Net Neutrality 'Smacks of Big Government'

Friday, February 27, 2015

Republican Sen. John Thune says that while he's not surprised by the FCC's decision, he is disappointed. 

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On The Media

What Radio Can Teach The Internet

Friday, February 27, 2015

Net neutrality is a 21st century concern, but the policy debate that erupted between FCC chairs, business and citizens echoes an eerily similar fray— from 70 years ago.

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On The Media

Free And Open

Friday, February 27, 2015

This week, net neutrality advocates celebrated the FCC's ruling that bans Internet service providers from giving faster connections to websites that pay for the privilege.

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The Takeaway

The Fight Against Digital Dead Zones

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Forget streaming Netflix—many children in Western Massachusetts sit in cars in library parking lots in order to access wifi to complete homework assignments. 

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The Takeaway

Municipally Owned Networks: The Future of The Open Web?

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

In addition to tomorrow's vote on net neutrality, the FCC will also decide whether or not to intervene in two states that have laws that limit municipally owned internet networks.

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The Takeaway

How Kansas City Became an Internet Powerhouse

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

In 2011, Google announced that Kansas City, Missouri would become a test site for Google Fiber, which offers a connection that's up to 100 times faster than today's basic broadband.

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The Takeaway

Web Utopias & Dial Up Dead Zones: The Fight for Net Neutrality

Monday, February 23, 2015

Should all internet traffic be treated equally? That's the question before the Federal Communications Commission this week.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Wild Wild Net: The FCC Wants to Regulate the Internet

Friday, February 20, 2015

The FCC plans to vote soon on whether it should regulate the Internet as a public utility. Net neutrality advocate Tim Wu discusses the latest on the FCC's proposal.

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The Takeaway

FCC Chairman: A Declaration of Independence for the Internet

Thursday, February 05, 2015

After 4 million responses from the public and a nudge from the president, the FCC chairmen sent a strong message yesterday: All internet must be treated equally.

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The Takeaway

Fast, Fair & Open: FCC Chief Pushes For New Rules To Support Net Neutrality

Wednesday, February 04, 2015

In an op-ed posted today, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler made himself very clear: He wants the internet to be an unrestricted channel for communication and commerce.

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On The Media

Resuscitating Net Neutrality

Friday, November 14, 2014

As Obama's first post-midterms policy proposal, net neutrality has once again been shocked with a defibrillator. Bob speaks with NYT reporter Edward Wyatt about the latest developments. 

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The Takeaway

The FCC Vote That May Change The Web

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Two upcoming FCC actions could fundamentally alter the future and structure of the Internet. One former FCC commissioner explains what you need to know.

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Gabfest Radio

Scandal at the VA Office

Friday, May 23, 2014

The Gabfest panelists have much to talk about this week: trouble at the VA, a long-awaited cover story for the Atlantic, new FCC proposals and more.

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On The Media

The Anti-SOPA Dream Team is Considering A Reunion Against the FCC's Proposed Net Neutrality Rules

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Just over two years ago, the Internet (that's big 'I' Internet) launched a coordinated campaign against Congressman Lamar Smith's Stop Online Piracy Act. The bill, it was feared, would kill the open, free Internet as we know it and stifle innovative new technologies and businesses by forcing ISPs to block domains that hosted potentially copyright infringing material. On January 18th, 2012, Wikipedia, Google, Mozilla, Craigslist, and thousands more, blacked out their homepages in protest of SOPA, a move that eventually spurred lawmakers to abandon the change. According to the Wall St. Journal, these heavyweights are considering a reunion tour.

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On The Media

The Death of Net Neutrality?

Friday, April 25, 2014

This week the FCC announced that it would consider a new draft of the Open Internet rules which, if passed, would all but kill net neutrality, the principle that all content should be treated equally. Manoush talks with Siva Vaidhyanathan about how this development might radically affect online innovation as we've known it.

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Money Talking

Should the Internet Be Treated Like a Utility?

Friday, February 21, 2014

The FCC is renewing its efforts to pass net neutrality rules to keep the internet free and open. These days, we can't live without the web, just like we can't live without water or power. So, should the government regulate internet access like a utility?

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WQXR Features

WQXR Expands its Reach into Westchester with New WQXW 90.3 FM

Monday, July 29, 2013

Beginning today, WQXR expands its reach into central and northern parts of Westchester County on the new WQXW 90.3 FM.

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On The Media

Who Paid for a Pittsburgh Political Attack Ad?

Friday, June 07, 2013

Shortly before last month’s mayoral primary in Pittsburgh an attack ad began airing criticizing one of the mayoral candidates. The ad was paid for by an anonymous third party and ordinarily the search into its provenance would have stopped there. But last year the FCC changed disclosure rules for anonymous attack ads. Brooke talks to Tim McNulty, political reporter for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, about who paid for the ad and why.

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On The Media

Anatomy of a Mistake

Friday, February 15, 2013

An article published by the Washington Post reported that the government wants to create public super WiFi networks that could potentially replace the ISPs most people use now. The piece was linked and posted all over the internet, but there was one tiny problem: it was wrong. Bob talks to Ars Technica writer Jon Brodkin about the inaccuracies in the reporting and what the FCC’s proposal might actually mean.  

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On The Media

Public Files Come Online...Sort Of.

Friday, May 04, 2012

In January, we covered a proposal to put the 'public files' of television stations online and the broadcaster's objections to the move. A public file, which stations are legally required to keep, contains information about what organizations are buying political ads and how much they've paid for each ad. Brooke speaks with Justin Elliott, reporter at ProPublica about a recent FCC ruling that will require some stations to put the files online.

 

Billy Bragg and Wilco - Union Prayer

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