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Famine

Radiolab

You Are What Your Grandpa Eats

Monday, November 19, 2012

Lars Olov Bygren, a professor at Umeå University in Sweden, grew up in a remote village north of the Arctic Circle. It wasn't an easy place to be a kid, and he has cold, hard data to back him up: book after book of facts and figures on ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Lester Brown explains how falling water tables, eroding soils, rising temperatures, and control of arable land and water resources is spurring the global struggle for food security. In Full Planets, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity Brown outlines the political implications of land acquisitions by grain-importing countries in Africa and elsewhere as well as the world’s shrinking buffers against poor harvests.

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The Takeaway

Musician K'Naan On Returning to Somalia After Twenty Years

Monday, December 26, 2011

In September, musician and poet K'Naan wrote an op-ed about returning to his native Somalia for The New York Times. He had left the country, which is in the grip of a devastating famine and violent civil war, twenty years earlier, fleeing with other members of his family for safety in Canada. He came on the show to discuss this in September.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Politics of Famine

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

As famine in Somalia worsens, Thomas Keneally, award winning author of Three Famines: Starvation and Politics, discusses the history and politics of famines in the age of global relief agencies.

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The Takeaway

Gauging US Military Involvement in Somalia

Thursday, August 11, 2011

The crisis in Somalia continues, with drought and famine plaguing the country and millions of refugees fighting for survival. The U.S. has approved $565 million in humanitarian aid so far this year. But our involvement in Somalia is does not stop there. According to an article in The New York Times yesterday, the U.S. has quietly been stepping up clandestine operations inside Somalia, training Somali intelligence operatives, interrogating suspects, and sending $45 million in arms to African soldiers and private security companies, to fight against the Shabaab, an al-Qaida aligned militant group.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Famine and Piracy in Somalia

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Jay Bahadur, journalist and author of The Pirates of Somalia: Inside their Hidden World, discusses the famine, drought, and piracy crises in Somalia.

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The Takeaway

Amid Famine, Somali Government Regains Control of Capital

Monday, August 08, 2011

In Somalia, there are renewed hopes that victims of the country's famine may at last receive much needed aid. Over the weekend African peacekeepers forced Somalia's al-Shabab Islamist rebels out of the capital, Mogadishu. The rebels have blocked several international relief groups from bringing food to Somalia. Jeffrey Gettleman, The New York Times' East Africa bureau chief, reports on the latest from Nairobi.

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The Takeaway

From Positive Change to Extremist Force: The History of al-Shabab in Somalia

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

One of the biggest obstacles to providing aid to those affected by the drought and famine crisis in Somalia has been the militant group al-Shabab, which controls large parts of southern Somalia. The al-Qaida-linked group is refusing to allow many Western aid organizations into the country, and at the same time is blocking people who attempt to flee. As a result, the lives of 500,000 children are at risk as they suffer from malnutrition. Al-Shabab is viewed as a dangerous and extremist force in Somalia today, but that was not always the case.

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The Takeaway

Somalia Famine Made Worse by Militants Blocking Aid

Tuesday, August 02, 2011

The five countries of the Horn of Africa are experiencing the worst declared drought in 60 years. What was a serious problem with the weather has become a humanitarian crisis in Somalia where over 60 percent of the country is controlled by militias who have been hampering the access of aid groups. 

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The Takeaway

Delivering Aid to Famine Victims Proves Difficult in Somalia

Monday, July 25, 2011

The Horn of Africa's worst drought in more than 60 years continues to wreak havoc as millions of people are affected by the resulting famine. Somalia has been the worst hit so far but delivering aid to the region has proved difficult since large parts of southern Somalia are controlled by the Islamic militant group al-Shabaab. Kenya, Eritrea and Ethiopia are also struggling with the humanitarian crisis. 

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The Takeaway

Famine and Somalia: The Challenges of Providing Aid in a Failed State

Friday, July 22, 2011

Millions of Somalis are mired in a deep humanitarian crisis that is now driving thousands of refugees over the border to Kenya daily. Famine is devastating the country, and the process of seeking outside aid is complicated by by an ineffective government, interference by the al-Qaida linked group al-Shabaab, and internal strife. Regardless, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has called for international aid agencies to bring food and supplies.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Horn of Africa in Crisis

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Jeffrey Gettleman, East Africa bureau chief for The New York Times in Dadaab, Kenya, and Shannon Scribner, humanitarian policy director at Oxfam America, discuss the famine in Somalia and the growing humanitarian crisis in East Africa.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported, Part II: Concerns about Terrorism Delay US Aid to Somalia

Thursday, July 21, 2011

More than 2.5 million Somalis are now in desperate need of food, but it wasn’t until late Wednesday that the State Department announced that it would send food aid to the country. The reason? Concerns that sending food aid would be aiding al-Shabab, which controls parts of southern Somalia and which the United States views as a terrorist organization. On today’s Underreported, Eliza Griswold, Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation and author of The Tenth Parallel, describes why the State Department was concerned that al-Shabab would use the food as a weapon and the challenges of providing food aid to areas where aid workers were banned until quite recently.

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The Takeaway

Famine Declared in Southern Somalia but Terrorists May Block Aid

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

The United Nations has declared parts of southern Somalia to be in a state of famine, as the country struggles to cope with a drought that has affected more than 10 million people in the Horn of Africa. But international aid efforts may be complicated because of the Islamic terrorist organization Al-Shabaab, which controls sections of southern Somalia and has in the past restricted access to the region.

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The Takeaway

"He's lost his mantle:" US Ambassador to Zimbabwe James McGee on Robert Mugabe

Thursday, December 18, 2008

The Takeaway gets a first-hand update on the worsening situation in Zimbabwe from U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe James McGee. He shares his thoughts on president Robert Mugabe, the cholera epidemic and the possibility of a power-sharing deal between Mugabe's ZANU-PF party and Morgan Tsvangirai's opposition MDC.

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The Takeaway

Zimbabwe's cholera epidemic spreads to South Africa

Tuesday, December 02, 2008

Zimbabweans have long been entering South Africa to escape their country's economic decline. Now they're fleeing a cholera epidemic. South African resources are being stretched to the limit as health workers try to contain the disease. In Musina, fifteen minutes from the border, tents have been set up in the grounds of the local hospital to treat patients. Many of the Zimbabweans coming into South Africa do so illegally by swimming the Limpopo river. Officials have confirmed that tests carried out on the river have found it to be polluted. But South Africa is not turning away anyone who is sick. Sarah Jacobs from Save The Children discusses the situation.
"We are responding to tens of thousands of people to help save lives, but we just need more resources. We need more money."
—Sarah Jacobs from Save The Children on the status of relief organizations

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The Takeaway

The plight of the honeybee

Thursday, July 10, 2008

Hundreds of beekeepers, researchers and vendors are gathering in Huntington, W. Va., today for the Heartland Apiculture Society’s 7th annual bee conference. The buzz this year is the honeybee crisis. Since 2006, they have been disappearing en masse and the cause for the collapse remains unknown.

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The Takeaway

Hungry for change: Rethinking how the poor get healthy and affordable food

Monday, July 07, 2008

Back in the 1960’s, when the middle-class fled the cities for suburban refuge, there was an unforeseen consequence: the ‘grocery gap.’ It’s been widening over the years and as gas and food prices soar it’s gotten harder for the poor to get healthy and affordable food. One man, however, with a very simple plan, is turning this around: Pennsylvania State Representative Dwight Evans.

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The Takeaway

The forgotten crisis: A looming famine in wartorn Somalia

Thursday, May 22, 2008

High global food prices have pushed the country even closer to the brink of famine by exacerbating the devastating effects of violence, displacement and chaos. The United Nations has declared a wide swath of central Somalia a humanitarian emergency, the final stage before a full-blown famine.

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