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Family And Children

The Leonard Lopate Show

Growing Up with Tammy and George

Wednesday, July 06, 2011

Georgette Jones, daughter of country music stars George Jones and Tammy Wynette, talks about her famous parents and what it was like growing up in a broken family living in the glare of the public spotlight. In The Three of Us: Growing Up with Tammy and George she recounts her parents divorce and Tammy’s descent into prescription pill addiction and untimely death at the age of 55. Georgette also writes of her broken relationship with her father and what it took for them to come back together.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Immigrants Raising American Citizens

Monday, July 04, 2011

Hirokazu Yoshikawa, professor of education in Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, talks about the nearly four million children born in this country to undocumented immigrant parents, and looks at how the circumstances they are being raised in adversely influence their development. Immigrants Raising Citizens is based on data from a three-year study of infants from undocumented immigrant families, and includes important implications his findings have for immigration policy, labor law enforcement, and the structure of community services for immigrant families.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

America’s Ideas about Family

Monday, June 27, 2011

Brian Powell talks about how Americans’ definitions of family are changing and what that means for public policy. Counted Out: Same-sex Relations and Americans' Definitions of Family broadens the scope of previous studies of how Americans view their own families to examine the way Americans characterize the concept of family in general. Although such issues as same-sex marriage and gay adoption remain at the center of a cultural divide, Counted Out demonstrates that American definitions of family are becoming more expansive, not less.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jennifer Grant Reminisces about Her Father, Cary Grant

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Jennifer Grant, the only child of Cary Grant, discusses her relationship with her elegant, sophisticated father. Good Stuff is a portrait of Cary Grant and his philosophy of life, and the story of a profound relationship between a daughter and her father.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Anti-Romantic Child

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Priscilla Gilman discusses how she came to terms with her son’s developmental disorder and how it radically altered the expectations she had about motherhood. Her memoir The Anti-Romantic Child talks about why her vision of what her child would be like wasn’t fulfilled in the ways she imagined, and she reveals how events and situations that are often perceived as setbacks can actually inspire and enrich us.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Marriage Confidential

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Pamela Haag looks at the state of marriage today and investigates why the generation of people who grew up believing they would "have it all" now have ended up disenchanted. In Marriage Confidential: The Post-Romantic Age of Workhorse Wives, Royal Children, Undersexed Spouses, and Rebel Couples Who Are Rewriting the Rules Haag writes about contemporary marriages where spouses act more like life partners than lovers, children take over the marital relationship, and where sexual fidelity and passion are constantly undermined.  She also looks at marriages that work, and how couples navigate the territories of career, money, social life, child rearing, and sex.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

John Donohue: A Man with a Pan

Monday, June 13, 2011

John Donohue, an editor at The New Yorker, talks about the joys—and perils—of feeding families. In Man with a Pan, 21 writers and chefs—from Mario Batali to Mark Bittman to Steven King—write about cooking for their families. It’s a celebration of those who toil behind the stove trying to nourish and please their friends and loved ones.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Buzz: A Year of Paying Attention

Thursday, June 02, 2011

Investigative reporter Katherine Ellison tells what happened when she and her 12-year-old son were both diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. in Buzz: A Year of Paying Attention is an account of her journey to reconnect with her high-spirited son, and of their search for a solution to their problems.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

David Goldman's Battle to Bring His Son Home

Thursday, May 12, 2011

David Goldman tells about his years-long struggle to bring his son home after he was abducted by his wife. In A Father’s Love: One Man’s Unrelenting Battle to Bring His Abducted Son Home, Goldman recounts his battle to bring Sean back home—an international controversy that would eventually reach the highest levels of the U.S. and Brazilian governments. It would be almost five years before David saw Sean again.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Melissa Fay Greene on Parenthood

Thursday, May 05, 2011

Melissa Fay Greene, best known for her books on the civil rights movement and the African HIV/AIDS pandemic, talks about a more personal side of her life—parenthood. No Biking in the House Without a Helmet is her celebration of parenthood and her ingathering of children, through birth and adoption, and it paints a loving portrait of a unique family wobbing between disaster and joy.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Immigrants Raising Citizens

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Hirokazu Yoshikawa, professor of education in Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, talks about the nearly four million children born in this country to undocumented immigrant parents, and looks at how the circumstances they are being raised in adversely influence their development. Immigrants Raising Citizens is based on data from a three-year study of infants from undocumented immigrant families, and includes important implications his findings have for immigration policy, labor law enforcement, and the structure of community services for immigrant families.

Comments [16]

The Takeaway

Talking With Your Kids About Money

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Many parents grapple with how to talk to their kids about a certain sensitive topic. They want to know: Are the kids old enough to understand? Am I talking about this too late, or too early? Will I explain things clearly, or just confuse them? I'm referring, of course, to the money talk. And I'm a firm believer in the idea that no kid is too young to get it.

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The Takeaway

Nanny Lit's New Voice: Victoria Brown

Monday, April 11, 2011

'Nanny lit' may have turned heads years ago in the publishing world, but there's a new voice — and a new book — getting people excited about the genre. Trinidadian immigrant Victoria Brown worked as a nanny on the Upper East Side, and she talks with us about her new book, "Minding Ben," as well as her own path to motherhood. 

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It's A Free Country ®

The Currency of Relationships

Friday, March 04, 2011

We don’t fight about money, we fight about all sorts of things that resemble a market place… there are all sorts of commodities separate from money which really take a lot of our attention, such as time, sleep, exercise, all sorts of responsibility.

Katherine Rosman, columnist at Wall Street Journal, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Judith Warner on Children, Parents, Mental Health, and Medication

Monday, February 07, 2011

Judith Warner investigates the state of children’s mental health and whether children are being over-diagnosed and over-medicated. Her book We’ve Got Issues: Children and Parents in the Age of Medication includes extensive research and interviews with dozens of doctors, researchers, family experts, and parents and brings compassion to the debate over how to best treat children’s mental health disorders.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Pulling the Plug on Technology

Friday, January 28, 2011

Susan Maushart tells us what happened when she decided to pull the plug on her family's electronics for six months—iPods, PCs, video games, iphones and all. In The Winter of Our Disconnect: How Three Totally Wired Teenagers (and a Mother Who Slept with Her iPhone) Pulled the Plug on Their Technology and Lived to Tell the Tale she shares the story of how her family discovered that having fewer tools to communicate with actually led them to communicate more.

Comments [25]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Amy Chua on Raising Her Kids the Chinese Way

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Amy Chua talks about raising her children the Chinese way, and explains how it’s different—and why she thinks it’s better—than the American way. Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother explores the differences in Eastern and Western parenting, and is a chronicle about raising her daughters the Chinese way—no play dates, no school plays, the expectation that they get straight As and that they play the piano or violin.

Comments [56]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Not Quite Adults

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Richard Settersten and Barbara Ray discuss why 20-somethings are delaying adulthood. Not Quite Adults: Why 20-Somethings Are Choosing a Slower Path to Adulthood, and Why It's Good for Everyone draws on almost a decade of cutting-edge research, and has nearly 500 interviews with young people. The findings reveal that a slower path to adulthood may be beneficial.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Reshaping the Work-Family Debate

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Joan Williams discusses why the United States has the most family-hostile public policy in the developed world, and she shows how that disadvantages men as well as women. In Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter, Williams looks at why new mothers are often pushed out by discriminating and inflexible workplaces that pit men against woman, and she examines the often-ignored role of class in work-family issues.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Baby, We Were Meant for Each Other

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Scott Simon, host of NPR’s Weekend Edition, tells the story of how he and his wife found true love with two tiny strangers from the other side of the world. In Baby, We Were Meant for Each Other: In Praise of Adoption, he shares the anxieties, along with the joy, of adoption, and includes the stories of other adoptive families.

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