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Evolution

Studio 360

Ruth Padel: "Survival of the Fittest"

Friday, November 20, 2009

Padel reads from her poetry collection, Darwin: A Life In Poems.

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Studio 360

Alpha

Friday, November 20, 2009

Acclaimed novelist Lydia Millet imagines a future where a genetic engineering accident has wiped out much of the earth's plant life. When a few blades of grass appear on a remote island, a scientist goes to investigate. Martha Plimpton reads the story. With production ...

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Studio 360

Homo-Thespian

Friday, November 20, 2009

A new play, "Hominid," reenacts a violent incident that took place in a chimpanzee colony. Primate expert Frans de Waal and the play's actors describe what it took to stage a chimpanzee drama with a very human story. Produced by Philip Graitcer, with

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Studio 360

More From Denis Dutton

Friday, November 20, 2009

According to Dutton, Igor Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” shows how our art instinct is still evolving.

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Studio 360

The Art Instinct

Friday, November 20, 2009

Denis Dutton is a professor of the philosophy of art interested in evolutionary biology. In his controversial book The Art Instinct, he argues that certain tastes in art are genetic. Dutton believes that if we examine art from around the world, we can see the marks ...

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Studio 360

Spencer Wells

Friday, November 20, 2009

Where did we come from? Evolutionary biologist Spencer Wells is pretty close to the answer. He's the National Geographic "Explorer-in-Residence" and heads an initiative called the Genographic Project. By collecting DNA samples from people around the world, he's tracing the paths of human migration, and he's ...

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Studio 360

Darwin: A Life In Poems

Friday, November 20, 2009

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the publication of On The Origin of Species. Charles Darwin's great-great-granddaughter, Ruth Padel, tells her famous ancestor's life story all in verse. One poem describes Darwin's awe at the sealife that washed up on the deck of the ...

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Studio 360

Evolution

Friday, November 20, 2009

Studio 360 puts evolution to the test. 2009 is Darwin's bicentennial, and this week marks 150 years since "On the Origin of Species" was published. Darwin's descendant, Ruth Padel, writes poems about her famous relative. Spencer Wells gathers DNA around the world to determine where we came from. An amateur paleontologist finds a way to believe in both God and the fossil record. Plus the world premiere of a short science fiction story by Lydia Millet, imagining the downside of messing too much with genes.

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Studio 360

You say you want an Evolution?

Thursday, November 19, 2009

It's almost exactly 150 years since On the Origin of Species was published, so for this week's show we decided to put evolution to the test.  We learned a lot of cool facts in producing this hour: did you know the human species was nearly extinct -- dwindling to just 2,000 people -- 70,000 years ago? And if you ever worried about genetic engineering going awry, don't miss the amazing sci-fi short story we commissioned from writer Lydia Millet.

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The Takeaway

Could Mosquitoes Bring Disease to Galapagos Reptiles?

Tuesday, June 02, 2009

Biologists have discovered that mosquitoes on the Galapagos have evolved to pierce the skin of reptiles, including iguanas and endangered tortoises. The mosquitoes daily reptilian snack brings a threat of transferring vector-borne disease to the animals. Leaving scientists to ask the question: how can we keep the Galapagos as pristine as when Darwin first found them? Evolutionary biologist Simon J. Goodman joins The Takeaway with more.

Goodman is co-author of the research article, "Natural colonization and adaptation of a mosquito species in Galapagos and its implications for disease threats to endemic wildlife," which was published in this week's issue of the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Here's a view of Galapagos Wildlife:

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The Takeaway

Cooking Up A New Theory Of Human Evolution

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

To answer what makes us human has long been a scientific quest. It’s one that Dr. Richard Wrangham has been wrestling with since the 1970’s, when he started his career, observing chimps with Dr. Jane Goodall. Then about 10 years ago, while sitting in front of his own fireplace, a theory of human evolution came to him. It’s one that he lays out in his new book: Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human. Richard Wrangham is the Ruth B. Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University's Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. He joins The Takeaway with his take on human evolution.

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WNYC News

Ida Unveiled at the Natural History Museum

Wednesday, May 20, 2009

Mayor Bloomberg at the unveiling of the 47-million-year-old fossil May 19, 2009. (Edward Reed)

Mayor Bloomberg at the unveiling of the 47-million-year-old fossil May 19, 2009. (Edward Reed)

It may be small, but scientists say the remarkably complete skeleton of a 47-million-year-old ...

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WNYC News

Step On A Crack, Break Your Mother's Back?

Monday, April 06, 2009

In America, three out of four people say they believe in the possibility of ghosts, psychics, telepathy or some measure of the supernatural. Why? Bruce Hood tells Brian Lehrer that it's a product of the brain that creates the mind.

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The Takeaway

Survivor: Planet Earth

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

There's a polar bear meeting in Norway this week, where politicians are considering how to handle the dire predictions surrounding the fate of our arctic friend. And this meeting got us thinking: in the face of a warming globe, is extinction the only option? Are organisms, along with a little thing called natural selection, finding a way to beat this formidable foe? We hope Warren Allmon, a paleontology professor at Cornell who specializes in macroevolution, can shed some light on our queries. Mr. Allmon is also the director of the Museum of the Earth.

Polar Bear S.O.S. has enlisted children to spread the word about the animal's plight. Hear their message below.

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On Being

Sherwin Nuland — The Biology of the Spirit (Encore).

Thursday, March 12, 2009

Former surgeon Sherwin Nuland speaks about his sense of wonder at the body's capacity to sustain life and support our pursuits of order and meaning, and why he believes the human spirit is an evolutionary accomplishment of the brain. The three-pound human

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On Being

[Unedited] Sherwin Nuland With Krista Tippett

Thursday, March 12, 2009

Former surgeon Sherwin Nuland speaks about his sense of wonder at the body's capacity to sustain life and support our pursuits of order and meaning, and why he believes the human spirit is an evolutionary accomplishment of the brain. The three-pound human

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On Being

James Moore — Evolution and Wonder: Understanding Charles Darwin [remix]

Thursday, February 05, 2009

We'll take a fresh and thought-provoking look at Darwin's life and ideas. He did not argue against God but against a simple understanding of the world — its beauty, its brutality, and its unfolding creation.

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On Being

[Unedited] James Moore with Krista Tippett

Thursday, February 05, 2009

We'll take a fresh and thought-provoking look at Darwin's life and ideas. He did not argue against God but against a simple understanding of the world — its beauty, its brutality, and its unfolding creation.

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Michael Specter on retroviruses

Monday, November 26, 2007

Michael Specter talks about ancient, deadly viruses that are being brought back from extinction, wha

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Studio 360

Unweaving the Rainbow

Saturday, December 18, 2004

History is full of poets who have extolled the wonders of nature. And in his book Unweaving the Rainbow, the brilliant Oxford University biologist Richard Dawkins professes that he is equally amazed at the poetry of the natural world. His latest book on evolution is called The ...

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