Streams

 

Evolution

The Takeaway

In the Face of Violence, Do Societies Turn Inward to Evolve?

Tuesday, January 01, 2013

During periods following brutal acts of violence or unthinkable devastation, it is easy for our brains to run wild with worry. But as violence declines worldwide, is there any argument to be made that chaos to some extent is the catalyst for reflection and change? When societies face a crisis, do they increasingly look inward to evolve? Steven Pinker, a professor of psychology at Harvard University and author of “The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined," explains.

Comments [2]

On The Media

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, December 14, 2012

A hundred years ago this week, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery." 

Califone - Lunar H

Comments [2]

Radiolab

On Goose Bumps

Monday, November 26, 2012

It turns out these little flashing studs of flesh used to do something very specific (and useful!) for us. Lulu Miller explains how goose bumps used to protect us.

Read More

Comments [29]

Radiolab

Leaving Your Lamarck

Monday, November 19, 2012

Jad starts us off with some wishful parental thinking: that no matter how many billions of lines of genetic code, or how many millions of years of evolution came before you, your struggles, your efforts, matter -- not just in a touchy feely kind of way, but in ways that ...

Comments [20]

Radiolab

Inheritance

Monday, November 19, 2012

Stories of nature and nurture slamming into each other, & shaping our biological blueprints.

Comments [113]

The Takeaway

NOVA Science Show Considers What Makes Us Human

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

David Pogue, technology columnist for The New York Times, talks about his new Nova Science Now series which explores a number of big scientific questions including: What makes us human?

Comments [3]

It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Did you think the GOP's War on Science Was Over? It's Not

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Hey Congress, please let people with either a legitimate science background or at least a respect for science serve on the Science Committee.

Read More

Comments [3]

On Being

Xavier Le Pichon — Fragility and the Evolution of Our Humanity [remix]

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Xavier Le Pichon, one of the world's leading geophysicists, helped create the field of plate tectonics. A devout Catholic and spiritual thinker, he has come to think of caring attention to weakness as an essential quality that allowed humanity to evolve.

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Xavier Le Pichon with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Xavier Le Pichon, one of the world's leading geophysicists, helped create the field of plate tectonics. A devout Catholic and spiritual thinker, he has come to think of caring attention to weakness as an essential quality that allowed humanity to evolve.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Only Humans On Earth

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Chris Stringer, author of Lone Survivors: How We Came to be the Only Humans on Earth, discusses his new book laying out his controversial theory on the evolutionary origins of modern humanity.

Comments [10]

On Being

Michael McCullough — Getting Revenge and Forgiveness [remix]

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Michael McCullough describes science that helps us comprehend how revenge came to have a purpose in human life. He stresses science is revealing that human beings are more instinctively equipped for forgiveness than we've given ourselves credit for.

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Michael McCullough with Krista Tippett

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Michael McCullough describes science that helps us comprehend how revenge came to have a purpose in human life. He stresses science is revealing that human beings are more instinctively equipped for forgiveness than we've given ourselves credit for.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Teaching Evolution with Biorobots

Monday, April 16, 2012

John Long talks to us about how robotics offers an innovative approach to the study of evolution. Long is a professor of biology and cognitive science at Vassar College, chair of  the Biology Department, director of Vassar's Interdisciplinary Robotics Research Lab and author of Darwin's Devices: What Evolving Robots Can Teach Us About the History of Life and the Future of Technology

Comments [9]

The Takeaway

E.O. Wilson, from Ant Colonies to Human Nature

Thursday, April 12, 2012

E.O. Wilson, the biologist, theorist, and sometimes-novelist, has pioneered entire fields of study in his six-decade career. Back in 1975, Wilson popularized the theory of sociobiology: the idea that evolution and genetics shape human behavior. Wilson’s new book, "The Social Conquest of Earth" tackles this subject and through one simple question: how did altruism evolve in species like human and ants, when so few species are altruistic?

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Design in Nature

Thursday, February 02, 2012

Adrian Bejan takes the recurring patterns in nature—trees, tributaries, air passages, neural networks, and lightning bolts—and reveals how a the Constructal Law accounts for the evolution of these and all other designs in our world. Design in Nature: How the Constructal Law Governs Evolution in Biology, Physics, and Social Organization, written with J. Peder Zane, looks at how everything—from biological life to inanimate systems—generates shape and structure and evolves in a sequence of ever-improving designs in order to facilitate flow.

Comments [22]

Radiolab

Sleepless in South Sudan

Monday, October 31, 2011

Carl Zimmer is one of our go-to guys when we need help untangling a complicated scientific idea. But in this short, he unravels something much more personal.

Read More

Comments [22]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Viruses, Humans, and the Dawn of a New Pandemic Age

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Stanford biologist Nathan Wolfe looks at the history of viruses and human beings. He explains how deadly viruses like HIV, swine flu, and bird flu almost wiped us out in the past; and why modern life has made humans vulnerable to the threat of a global pandemic in The Viral Storm: The Dawn of a New Pandemic Age.

Comments [3]

The Brian Lehrer Show

How We Know What's Really True

Monday, October 03, 2011

Richard Dawkins, evolutionary biologist and author talks about his new graphic science book, The Magic of Reallity: How We Know What's Really True, illustrated by Dave McKean, which explores what we should teach our kids about science, the world and why.

Comments [98]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Community Activism and Darwin

Thursday, August 25, 2011

David Sloan Wilson, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Biology and Anthropology at Binghamton University discusses his new book,  The Neighborhood Project: Using Evolution to Improve My City, One Block at a Time . He describes how he applies Darwin's evolutionary theory to community development in search of practical strategies.

What neighborhood projects are you involved with?

Comments [18]

The Takeaway

'The Neighborhood Project:' Tackling Social Problems with Evolutionary Biology

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Many U.S. cities that once depended on manufacturing — cities like Detroit, Cleveland and Binghamton, N.Y. — experienced job loss and a decline in population years before the Great Recession began. John Hockenberry grew up outside of Binghamton and watched a great, vibrant city fall. IBM, once a major employer in the area, moved its factories overseas, and other businesses followed. Today, downtown Binghamton is filled with empty storefronts and houses.

Comments [2]