Streams

 

Evolution

The Leonard Lopate Show

Humans Have Evolved to Reproduce, Not to be Healthy

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Are our bodies adapted to be a hunter-gatherer on the Serengeti? The answer is complicated. Harvard biologist Daniel E. Lieberman says we're actually still evolving, and that cultural factors are as important in shaping humans as biological ones.

Comments [28]

The Leonard Lopate Show

How the Body Evolved; Polish Film; a Novel in the New Tales of the City Series; McCarthyism in NYC

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Evolutionary biologist Daniel E. Lieberman looks at how the human body has evolved over millions of years, and the conditions our bodies have not entirely adapted to, resulting in obesity and new but avoidable diseases like type 2 diabetes. Then, we’ll talk with director Kryzstztof Zanussi and two film restoration experts about a retrospective of Polish cinema curated by Martin Scorsese. Armistead Maupin discusses The Days of Anna Madrigal, the ninth installment in his Tales of the City series. And we’ll take look at the personal, physical and mental impact of McCarthyism on six New York City political activists.

On Being

Ursula King, Andrew Revkin, and David Sloan Wilson — Teilhard de Chardin's "Planetary Mind" and Our Spiritual Evolution [remix]

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Ursula King with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Andrew Revkin with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] David Sloan Wilson with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Comment

Radiolab

Who's Got A Pregnant Brain?

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Something happened to dolphins. Then it happened to humans. Both creatures had good-sized brains when, for reasons no one truly understands, dolphin brains suddenly got larger and larger, until — 15 million years ago — they stopped growing. Two million years ago it was our turn. Our brains went from the size of an orange to the size of a cantaloupe. Why the start? Why the stop? Who's next?

Read More

Comments [6]

On The Media

Creationism’s Public Relations Campaign

Friday, January 10, 2014

A recent Pew Research Center analysis finds that one-third of Americans reject the theory of evolution, believing that “humans and other living things have existed in their present form since the beginning of time.” Brooke speaks to Edward Caudill, author of Intelligently Designed: How Creationists Built the Campaign Against Evolution, who says that modern media has been a godsend for Creationists.

Comments [10]

The Brian Lehrer Show

AmeriCanada!; Pregnancy Myths; Evolutionary Medicine

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Journalist Diane Francis has a modest proposal: the U.S. and Canada should merge. She talks about what both countries could bring to the partnership. Plus: neuroscientist Sam Harris on lying; economist Emily Oster debunks pregnancy myths about what’s dangerous for a woman who is expecting; and a deep look at “mismatch diseases”; how to be a friend to a friend who is sick; and an urban monk talks about spirituality in the city.

The Takeaway

Study: Memories Can Be Passed Between Generations

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Researchers at the Emory University School of Medicine recently released a study arguing that memories can be passed on through DNA. It’s the latest piece in a growing body of evidence for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, and if it’s right, it could change the way we act in our everyday lives.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Fastest Evolving Place on Earth

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Scientists recently determined that Páramos, small, high-elevation ecosystems in the Andes, are the fastest evolving places on earth. Science writer Carl Zimmer explains what makes these tiny mountainous enclaves—and their giant daisy trees—so diverse.

Comment

Specials

The Long Game

Saturday, November 09, 2013

For more than a half a century, citizens of the Lone Star State have had intense, emotional battles over what children should and shouldn’t be taught in public school classrooms.

Comments [4]

On Being

David Sloan Wilson — Evolving a City [remix]

Thursday, October 17, 2013

David Sloan Wilson believes that evolution is not just a description of how we got here. He says it can also be a tool kit for improving how we live together.

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] David Sloan Wilson with Krista Tippett

Thursday, October 17, 2013

David Sloan Wilson believes that evolution is not just a description of how we got here. He says it can also be a tool kit for improving how we live together.

Comment

Radiolab

How One Plus One Became Everything: A Puzzle of Life

Monday, August 19, 2013

Why did it take cells so long to link together and form tissues, organs, you, me, turtles, daisies? There was a couple of billion year pause before cells became multicellular. How come? With brilliant designer Paolo Ceric, we consider this puzzle of life.

Read More

Comments [1]

Radiolab

The Subtle Mysteries Of Dinosaur Sex

Tuesday, August 06, 2013

This we know: that dinosaurs had babies. This we also know: that to have those babies, dinosaurs had sex. But here's what we don't know: with their size, their spikes, their scales, their genital equipment, how did they manage to do the deed? This doesn't prevent us from wondering.

Read More

Comments [1]

Radiolab

Look What You've Done, North America!

Thursday, July 25, 2013

When the Isthmus of Panama connected North and South America, two independent dynasties of horses, rhinos, elephants, shrews, weasels, cats and dogs were free to mingle, fight, dominate or die. Who won?

Read More

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Our Missing Ancestor

Monday, July 08, 2013

Jamie Shreeve, National Geographic magazine’s executive editor for science talks about why DNA from a skeleton found in a cave in Russia adds a mysterious new member to the human family. His latest article, “The Case of the Missing Ancestor,” is in the July issue of National Geographic.


 

Comments [2]

On The Media

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, July 05, 2013

A hundred years ago, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. In an interview from December of last year, Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery." 

 

Comments [1]

Radiolab

Stroke, Stroke, Stroke — The Atlantic Ocean's Dazzling Oarsmen

Saturday, June 29, 2013

At night, in the ocean, they look like little Broadway billboards with dazzling trills of rainbow colored light. They have eight little runways on their bodies for light display. What are they?

Read More

Comment