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Evacuation

Transportation Nation

90 Seconds: The Technology and Investment Behind Plane Evacuations

Monday, July 08, 2013

Marketplace

(Marketplace) Investigators from the U.S. and Korea are meeting today with the pilot of Asiana flight 214 to help determine what caused it to crash at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday. Officials have confirmed that two of the 291 passengers on board died in the crash. Over the years airlines and aircraft manufacturers have invested in technology to improve crash survivability.

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WNYC News

Do You Live in the City's New Evacuation Zones?

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Nearly 3 million New Yorkers' homes are now in evacuation zones that cover more than a third of the city's population, under new maps released Tuesday.

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WNYC News

Officals Testify No Specific Disaster Plans for Disabled

Monday, March 18, 2013

A federal trial is continuing in the case of disabled New Yorkers, who say the city needs a protocol for evacuating them during disasters, such as Sandy.

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WNYC News

Deadly Topography: The Staten Island Neighborhood Where 11 Died During Sandy

Monday, February 25, 2013

When Sandy hit, one section of Staten Island's Eastern Shore was particularly vulnerable: it sits in a bowl, several feet below a road that usually protects it from storm surges. See where 11 people died when the storm surged.

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WNYC News

Teachers, Students and Evacuees Co-Exist as Schools Set to Resume

Saturday, November 03, 2012

Teachers were back in school Friday, preparing for Monday’s reopening.  But eight public schools are still doing double duty as shelters for those displaced by flooding from Sandy. At Brooklyn Tech, the borough's most sought after public high school, students will share their building with the elderly and people with mental and physical disabilities. Some are apprehensive.

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Schoolbook

School Buildings Serve As Refuges For Evacuees

Thursday, November 01, 2012

School Buildings were a refuge for many people evacuated from Zone A areas over the weekend. SchoolBook spent time at one school serving dozens of families in crisis.

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WNYC News

Setting Up ‘Home’ Inside an Evacuation Shelter

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Some people who fled their homes in Lower Manhattan, hunkering down in a city evacuation center, moved again after the power went out Monday night. They’re now staying at a school on the Upper West Side, trying to make the best out of the situation as they wait for the all clear to go home.

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Schoolbook

Schools to Stay Closed Tuesday Due To Sandy

Monday, October 29, 2012

Schools will be closed for a second day on Tuesday as the city weathers the storm of Hurricane Sandy. For the latest news, check out the city's website nyc.gov as well as wnyc.org. Stay in touch @SchoolBook.

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The Takeaway

Wildfires Blaze in Colorado

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Over 30,000 people have been evacuated from the towns around Colorado Springs, Colorado’s second biggest city, where the Waldo Canyon wildfire doubled in size yesterday. What must be done to stop it?

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Transportation Nation

State Money Will Widen, Improve One Of Houston's Most Crowded Freeways

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

U.S. Highway 290 in Houston near the I-610 loop (photo courtesy Houston-Galveston Area Council)

(Houston, TX — Gail Delaughter, KUHF)  As more people move to the suburbs northwest of Houston, officials hope extra money from the state will help speed up improvement projects on U.S. Highway 290, one of the most congested roadways in Texas.  Highway 290 begins in the scenic Hill Country west of Austin, but once it approaches its eastern terminus at Houston's I-610 Loop, the drive is anything but peaceful as commuters face hours of bumper-to-bumper traffic.

Alan Clark heads up transportation and air quality programs for the Houston-Galveston Area Council, an association that helps local governments with planning issues in a 13-county region along the Texas Gulf Coast. Clark says the population of Houston's northwestern suburbs is expected to grow to close to a million people over the next couple of decades, but the congestion problems on 290 are already there.  Another reason for the urgency is that 290 is also a major hurricane evacuation route,  as it hooks up with State Highway 6 from the coastal city of Galveston.

So what needs to be done? Clark says along with widening the roadway, they also need to  improve the ramps at  Beltway 8, one of the two loops that currently encircle the city. Another trouble spot is near the 610 Loop, where frontage roads don't go all the way through.

"We don't want all the traffic to have to be on the freeway to get anywhere in the corridor," Clark says. "So being able to go along those frontage roads keeps some of that traffic off the freeway itself."

Texas recently identified $2 billion in transportation funds to be used for improvements to congested corridors around the state. Clark says the 290 project will now get an extra $350 million, and that means work that was supposed to be done over 15 to 20 years can now be compressed into five or six years.  One of the projects they're looking at is managed lanes.

"We're going to develop three managed lanes that can be reversed. So it's like getting six lanes for the price of three. They'll operate a bit like we see some of the HOV lanes operate. Only these will be tolled."

But as the population grows, Clark says they'll eventually have to look at ways to help people get to work without getting on the freeway. He says officials are also looking at the possibility of commuter rail along a nearby railroad right-of-way, but that project is still a few years away.

You can hear the KUHF story  here.

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Transportation Nation

Hurricane Irene: Photos From New York's Transit Shutdown

Saturday, August 27, 2011

As New York City undertook its first-ever weather-related transit system shut down, New Yorkers were greeted with a sight that many haven't seen since the 2005 transit strike: gated, taped off subway stations.

A subway station prepares for Hurricane Irene  (photo by Kate Hinds)

If that's not eerie enough for you, this picture of an (almost) empty Grand Central looks like it could be preparing for the sequel to "I Am Legend." (Full disclosure: I adapted that thought from Dan Diamond's twitter feed.)

Hurricane Irene: MTA Metro-North Railroad closed Grand Central Terminal as the hurricane approached. Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Marjorie Anders.

At 11am this morning, a white board in the token booth warned customers that time was dwindling to get the heck out of Dodge (or in this case, the West 81st Street subway station):

Sign inside the West 81st Street B/C station (photo by Kate Hinds)

Want to check the subway service status? It's pretty straightforward:

Meanwhile, MTA employees installed barriers to try to prevent water from entering train tunnels...

LIRR employees install an AquaDam to help prevent water from flowing into the LIRR's tunnels to Penn Station. Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Sam Zambuto.

...while city buses prepared to help move New Yorkers out of the mandatory evacuation zones.

Hurricane Irene prep: Buses lined up in Far Rockaway to help with evacuations. Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Palmer Reale.

Even the gates are coming off of rail road crossings.

LIRR employees removed the gates from 295 railroad crossings to prevent damage from high wind. Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Harry Baumann.

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WNYC News

Residents in Red Hook Show Defiance in the Face of Hurricane Irene

Saturday, August 27, 2011

Eggs and toast or yogurt and granola: that's all that's on the "Hurricane Menu" Saturday morning at restaurant and pub Fort Defiance in Red Hook, Brooklyn, one of many neighborhoods in the flood zone where residents have been issued a mandatory evacuation order ahead of Hurricane Irene.

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Transportation Nation

In Houston, Measure to Avoid Evacuation Logjam

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

(Houston -- KUHF) Hurricane season begins tomorrow, and it's on the minds of the Gulf Coast residents.

In 2005, millions of  Houstonians evacuated their homes during Rita, and  created a 30-mile traffic jam from downtown Houston along I-45 North.

"During the Rita experience, a lot of us were blind, we didn't know what was going out there," says Mike Vickch, webmaster for TranStar, which partnered with four government agencies to develop a solution.

Officials say new technology means a Rita-style jam won't happen again.

"This technology just enables traffic management personnel and the general public to know what's happening on the roadways during an evacuation or everyday," Vickch says.

Get the whole story over at KUHF News.

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