Streams

 

Ethics

On The Media

Interviewing Kids In the Wake of a Tragedy

Friday, December 21, 2012

A lot of criticism was leveled at the press for interviewing the child survivors of the Newtown school shooting in its immediate aftermath. Bob talks to WABC-TV reporter Bill Ritter about whether it's ever appropriate to interview a child in the moments after a disaster of this nature, and whether the very act of interviewing a child could contribute to the childrens' trauma.

Emiliana Torrini- Dead Duck

Comments [10]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Be Good

Friday, November 23, 2012

Randy Cohen, longtime "Ethicist" columnist for The New York Times Magazine and author of Be Good: How to Navigate the Ethics of Everything, calls on his experience as "The Ethicist" to offer a guide to goodness on the personal and policy level.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Be Good

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Randy Cohen, longtime "Ethicist" columnist for The New York Times Magazine and author of Be Good: How to Navigate the Ethics of Everything, calls on his experience as "The Ethicist" to offer a guide to goodness on the personal and policy level.

Comments [8]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Ethics of Voting

Friday, September 14, 2012

Roger Steare, business ethics consultant and the author of  Ethicability: How to Decide What's Right and Find the Courage to Do It, talks about how ethics shape the way we vote.

→Take the US 2012 Elections ethics and voting survey at www.MoralDNA.org.

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The Takeaway

For Premature Babies, A Fine Ethical Line Between Life and Death

Monday, August 20, 2012

For as long as we have had medical care, doctors have always faced tough choices. One area where this is increasingly being played out is in Neonatal Care Units, where 500,000 premature American babies are cared for each year.

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

Patient-Doctor Confidentiality Versus Public Safety

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

The fact that Holmes was seeing a psychiatrist prior to the theatre shooting in Aurora, Colorado, is a fact that has emerged in the past few days. Should his psychiatrist be required to disclose private information about her patient? And, had she known in advance that Holmes struggled with violent thoughts and delusions, should she have alerted police?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Ethical Chic

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Author of Ethical Chic: The Inside Story of the Companies We Think We Love, Fran Hawthorne, discusses her new book that investigates 6 beloved companies that are socially responsible and hip. But does the truth match their reputations?

Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Dan Ariely tells the Truth about Dishonesty

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

Behavioral economist Dan Ariely explores how unethical behavior works in the personal, professional, and political worlds, and he argues that irrational forces often determine whether we behave ethically or not. In The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone—Especially Ourselves Ariely shows why some things are easier to lie about; how getting caught matters less than we think; and how business practices pave the way for unethical behavior, both intentionally and unintentionally.

Comments [14]

The Takeaway

Study of Studies Finds Retractions in Drug Literature Often Indicative of Misconduct

Thursday, May 31, 2012

In January 2003, The Lancet — one of the world's oldest and most respected medical journals — published an article championing the combination of two drugs (ACE inhibitors and ARBs) in treating certain types of kidney disease. But then an investigation concluded that the data in the study had been collected in a way that made it scientifically unsound. The Lancet printed a retraction, but thousands of patients still receive these drugs in combination.

Comments [2]

On Being

Michael McCullough — Getting Revenge and Forgiveness [remix]

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Michael McCullough describes science that helps us comprehend how revenge came to have a purpose in human life. He stresses science is revealing that human beings are more instinctively equipped for forgiveness than we've given ourselves credit for.

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On Being

[Unedited] Michael McCullough with Krista Tippett

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Michael McCullough describes science that helps us comprehend how revenge came to have a purpose in human life. He stresses science is revealing that human beings are more instinctively equipped for forgiveness than we've given ourselves credit for.

Comment

Features

Restaurant Workers' Group Releases Ethical Eating Guide

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Restaurant Opportunities Centers United wants consumers to consider how the people making their food are being treated with a new manual called ROC National 2012 Diners' Guide: A Consumer Guide on the Working Conditions of American Restaurants. Should diners consider how workers are treated when ordering a meal? Cast your vote here.

Comments [5]

The Takeaway

Should Stephen Glass Be Allowed to Practice Law?

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Stephen Glass is now a 39-year-old law clerk at a firm in Beverly Hills, California. But more than decade ago, he was a young reporter on the rise. Glass's career in journalism came to an abrupt halt after it was discovered that over 40 of his articles — written for The New Republic, Harpers, Rolling Stone and other well-regarded magazines — were largely fabricated. Glass made up quotes, invented sources, and backed up his work with elaborate fake notes, fake websites, phony email addresses, phone numbers, and voicemail messages. 

Comments [3]

Schoolbook

Former Schools Official Is Fined for Ethics Violation

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

The former chief financial officer for the Department of Education has agreed to pay a $6,500 fine to the city’s Conflict of Interest Board for using his public e-mail account to promote a personal business and plot his exit into a private-sector job.

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The Takeaway

Listener Responses: Bone Marrow Donation

Friday, October 14, 2011

Yesterday, we spoke with blogger Seth Godin, who wanted to help his friend and colleague Amit Gupta, who has leukemia, so he offered up a challenge to his readers: the first bone marrow donor match to Gupta who would donate stem cells would receive $10,000. But under the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, better known as NOTA, it’s a federal crime to give or receive "valuable consideration" for any transplantable organ or tissue, specifically including bone marrow." Many Takeaway listeners responded to this story.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

What Makes Us Good

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Mark Matousek explains why he believes that, contrary to what we've been taught in our reason-obsessed culture, emotions are the foundation of ethical life, and that without emotions, human beings cannot be empathic, moral, or good. In Ethical Wisdom: What Makes Us Good, Matousek examines morality from a scientific, sociological, and anthropological standpoint.

At 19:50 you can hear Leonard's reaction to the earthquake!

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Two-Minus-One Pregnancy

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Ruth Padawer, a writer and professor who covers health and gender issues, discusses her recent article for the New York Times Magazine about the ethical decision of reducing twins to a single fetus. She explores the question of why the choice is such an uneasy one to make, even for pro-choice women.

Comments [35]

The Takeaway

How Easy Is It to Hack Into a Cell Phone?

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

So far, the News Corp. phone hacking scandal has led to the shutdown of the British tabloid News of the World, the arrests of 10 people, and the resignations of several News Corp. executives and high ranking police officials. Today, Rupert Murdoch and his son, James, will face a round of questioning before the British Parliament. And it all started with phone hacking. There’s no question that hacking is illegal and unethical. But is it difficult to do?

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Concerns Over Conflict of Interest in Medical Journal Reviews Sparks Investigation

Friday, July 01, 2011

This week, The Spine Journal, a scientific peer-reviewed journal of the North American Spine Society, came out with a special issue that critically compared clinical reports of products used to foster bone growth, in a case of a major conflict of interest with potentially devastating results. Doctors had been writing positive peer-reviewed research reviews about a product called Infuse, by a medical device company called Medtronic, but failed to mention that their own research showed the product had proven complications, including higher cancer rates and male infertility. The same doctors were also collecting royalties and fees totaling at least $62 million from Medtronic.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Ethics Reform in Albany

Tuesday, June 07, 2011

Ken Lovett, Daily News Albany Bureau Chief, talks about the new ethics reform legislation in Albany and other legislation still to come before the June 20th end of session.

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