Streams

 

 

Espionage

PRI's The World

Here's what happens when a spy sleeps with his targets

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

This is the story of Bob and Jacqui — Bob Lambert was a British police spy who worked in counterterrorism and Jacqui fell in love with the man she thought was a Greenpeace activist. Now, decades later, their relationship is at the center of a lawsuit over "rape by the state."

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PRI's The World

Hamas tries to send a message to Israel — with an unprecedented mass execution

Friday, August 22, 2014

Hamas' public execution of suspected Israeli spies sent a clear message: If you work with Israel, you'll pay the steepest possible price. But the killings come after top commanders died in Israeli airstrikes, which could mean that the group is deeply vulnerable to Israeli intelligence.

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The Takeaway

What's Germany So Upset About?

Friday, July 11, 2014

After new allegations of American spying, the German government has expelled the top American intelligence official there. But don't all nations spy?

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On The Media

Chinese Media's Perspective on Hacker Indictment

Friday, May 23, 2014

In an unprecedented move this week, the US Justice Department brought charges against 5 Chinese military officers for allegedly hacking American companies in an act of economic espionage. Bob speaks with Jeremy Goldkorn, who analyzes the Chinese media, about how the story is playing out in China.

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The Takeaway

Russia? Cuba? Ecuador? Where Will Snowden Go Next?

Monday, June 24, 2013

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden is leading the U.S. government on what appears to be an international chase. Snowden was expected to flee Hong Kong for Moscow, but he is now looking to find a safe harbor in Latin America. Today Ellen Barry, Moscow Bureau Chief for our partner The New York Times, fills us in on the latest as this story develops.

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Sidesteps Affirmative Action Ruling, Possible Prisoner Exchange With The Taliban, Where Will Snowden Go Next?

Monday, June 24, 2013

On Today's Show: Russia? Cuba? Ecuador? Where Will Snowden Go Next? | A Pageant Inspires Young Women with Disabilities | Supreme Court Sidesteps Affirmative Action Ruling | In Praise of Ambivalence | Possible Prisoner Exchange With The Taliban | Fertility After 35: Cutting Through the Junk Science | Obama Looks to Crackdown on Leaks | Jim Carey Pulls Support For Kick-Ass 2 Movie

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Bradley Manning Trial; Library Advocacy; NJ Primaries

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

The Espionage Act is at the heart of the Bradley Manning trial, which started this week, and the Justice Department investigations into media leaks. Fred Kaplan of Slate and Steve Coll of The New Yorker talk about the connections. Plus: library advocates on their work; it’s primary day in New Jersey; researchers look into the effects of Sandy; and Stephen Dubner of Freakonomics on tipping.

The Takeaway

Bradley Manning Court-Martial Begins, Teens and Online Privacy, Higher Education Moves Online

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Pushing for More Transparency in Bradley Manning Trial | Supreme Court Allows Police to Collect DNA Samples After Arrests | The Coming Revolution in Higher Ed | What Adults Can Learn from Teens About Online Privacy | President Obama Expected to Nominate 3 to U.S. Court of Appeals | Black ...

The Takeaway

American Diplomat Suspected of Espionage Detained by Russian Authorities

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

On Monday night, Russian authorities detained an employee of the American embassy named Ryan Christopher Fogle. They accused him of working for the CIA, and trying to recruit Russian agents for espionage. Fogle is alleged to have been found wearing a wig, carrying millions of euros, and instructions for divulging information to the US via a fake email account. Gordon Corera, author of The Art of Betrayal: The Secret History of MI6, and BBC security correspondent explains.

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On The Media

The CIA's Double Standard on Secrecy

Friday, January 18, 2013

In recent years, the CIA has authorized many of its former operatives to land lucrative book deals and pundit gigs — a fact that would have horrified previous generations of spooks. And yet, notes journalist Ted Gup, the agency remains notably selective about the information it allows to be disclosed. Bob talks with Ted about what he calls the CIA's "double standard" on secrecy.

 

Yo-Yo Ma - Bach's Suite for Cello #6 in D Major

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The Takeaway

Cyber Security Experts Discover "Flame," The Newest, Best Way to Spy on a Country

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

A Moscow-based cyber security team has discovered the most advanced computer program for spying ever – they say a nation wrote it to spy on the Middle East, though they don't know which nation specifically. They’re calling it “Flame.” Roel Schouwenberg, a senior policy analyst for Kaspersky Labs, the company that discovered Flame, explains exactly what makes this worm so special. And Kim Zetter, a senior writer at Wired Magazine, discusses what this means for the future of espionage and security.

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The Takeaway

Egypt May Free American Ilan Grapel in Swap With Israel

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

The prisoner swap between Hamas and Israel may be good news for an American man who has been detained in Egypt since June. Ilan Grapel, a 27-year-old law student from Queens, New York, who is also an Israeli citizen, was accused by Egypt of being a spy for Israel. Grapel's family have denied he has any links to espionage. Ethan Bronner, who reported on the story for The New York Times, has the latest on Grapel's expected release.

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The Takeaway

FBI: Pakistan Military Paid to Influence US Policy

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

According to newly unsealed FBI documents, the Pakistani military and its spy agency, the ISI, has spent $4 million over two decades to influence U.S. policy against India. The FBI has also indicted two U.S. citizens in connection with illegally lobbying members of Congress and presidential candidates. Syed Fai, who lives in Virginia, was arrested on Tuesday for failing to register with the Justice Department as an agent of Pakistan. The other man, Zaheer Ahmad, is at large in Pakistan.

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The Takeaway

NSA Employee Pleads Guilty to Misdemeanor

Friday, June 10, 2011

A former National Security Agency employee who was charged with leaking classified information has brokered a plea deal just days before his trial was set to begin. Thomas Drake pleaded guilty to a minor misdemeanor charge, and will face no jail time. Had he been convicted of the ten felony counts he was indicted for in April under the 1917 Espionage Act, he could have served over 30 years in prison. Drake pleaded guilty to misusing a government computer to share classified information with someone not authorized to receive that information. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Espionage

Friday, December 03, 2010

Today's Please Explain looks at spying, the organizations that do it, and how it's carried out and why. We're joined by Thomas S. Blanton, from George Washington University National Security Archives, and Joseph Weisberg, former CIA operative and author of An Ordinary Spy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Time to Betray

Monday, August 09, 2010

Reza Kahlili tells us about the inner workings of the notorious Revolutionary Guards of Iran, which he witnessed as an Iranian man in the ranks spying for the American government. A Time to Betray: The Astonishing Double Life of a CIA Agent Inside the Revolutionary Guards of Iran is a chronicle of lives torn apart by a terror-mongering regime that brought an age of religious fundamentalism under the Ayatollah Khomeini, and an account of his decades leading a double life informing on Iran: the country of his birth.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Russian Espionage and Christian Carion's film "Farewell"

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

Filmmaker Christian Carion and CIA veteran Jack Divine discuss Russian spies and international espionage in the 1980s. Carion’s film “Farewell” is set in Moscow in 1981, and recounts the true story of a disenchanted KGB colonel who gives top-secret documents to a French businessman working in Russia in an effort to end of the Cold War and create a better world for his son.

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WQXR News

New York City Judge Sets Bail for 1 Accused Russian Spy, Denies Bail for 2 Others

Friday, July 02, 2010

A Manhattan judge granted bail to one person accused of spying for Russia and denied bail to two others after a prosecutor warned the defendants had plenty of helpers in the U.S. to help them flee.

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WQXR News

Alleged Russian Spies Due Back in Court

Thursday, July 01, 2010

Nine of the 11 people arrested for allegedly serving as secret Russian spies will be appearing in federal court again today.

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WQXR News

Spies Among Us: How Common is Espionage?

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

As more details emerge about the 11 people accused of being secret Russian spies, many are wondering ... are there others out there?

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