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Environment

To Silence Discontent, Chinese Officials Alter Workweek

Saturday, May 04, 2013

After local authorities got word of a planned environmental protest in the southwestern city of Chengdu, they decided to make Saturday a workday. Security personnel, meanwhile, converged on the city center in a display of force.

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Unraveling The Mystery Of A Rice Revolution

Friday, May 03, 2013

An economist wanted to find out why some farmers in the developing world were abandoning a new way of growing rice that increases yields while reducing the need for seeds and water. He found that even while their rice fields were more productive, their household income didn't go up.

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NASA: Warming Climate Likely Means More Floods, Droughts

Friday, May 03, 2013

The wettest regions will see more heavy rainfall and the driest regions will see even less precipitation, according to the analysis of more than a dozen climate models.

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17-Year Cicadas Primed To Emerge

Friday, May 03, 2013

This spring the massive "Brood II" batch of 17-year cicadas is expected to emerge from the ground in backyards and parks all along the Eastern U.S. The insects will mate, lay eggs, and start the cycle all over again. Cicada expert John Cooley explains the unusual biology and evolution of periodical cicadas.

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Living Inside the Box

Friday, May 03, 2013

David Boyle and Michele Bertomen wanted to build their own house on a 20 by 40 foot lot they purchased in Brooklyn. Bertomen, an architect, drew up plans and the bid was over $300,000. Inspired by Bertomen's students at New York Institute of Technology, the couple built their house from five shipping containers, which cost a few thousand dollars a piece.

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Can Salmon Farming Be Sustainable? Maybe, If You Head Inland

Thursday, May 02, 2013

For years, salmon farming has gotten a bad rap from marine biologists, who say the fish grown in open-ocean net pens generate pollution, disease and parasites. But now, a few salmon farms have moved on land. From an environmental standpoint, some scientists say, that's "a huge step forward."

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Grocery Home Delivery May Be Greener Than Schlepping To The Store

Thursday, May 02, 2013

Getting groceries delivered may be the easiest environmentally friendly thing you've ever done, new research says. Think of it as your food taking mass transit.

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Ethical Fashion: Is The Tragedy In Bangladesh A Final Straw?

Thursday, May 02, 2013

Since a garment factory collapsed last month in Dhaka, killing more than 400 people, ethical fashion has been in the spotlight. Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Price of Cheap Fashion, explains the economy that created this tragedy and what we can do to fix it.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Lead Wars

Thursday, May 02, 2013

David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz look at lead poisoning during the past half century, focusing on one of the most contentious and bitter battles in the history of public health. Their book Lead Wars: The Politics and Science and the Fate of America’s Children chronicles the obstacles faced by public health workers in the conservative, pro-business, anti-regulatory climate that took off in the Reagan years and that stymied efforts to eliminate lead from the environment and the bodies of children.

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Who Paid For Last Summer's Drought? You Did

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

Corn and soybean farmers not only survived last year's epic drought — thanks to crop insurance, they made bigger profits than they would have in a normal year, a new analysis finds. And a big chunk of those profits were provided through taxpayer subsidies.

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On The Media

Interview with David Sassoon, Founder of Pulitzer Prize Winning Environmental News Organization

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

In July of 2010, a catastrophic oil spill took place in Marshall, Michigan, flooding a million gallons of oil into the Kalamazoo river. At the time, the media paid it little attention, distracted perhaps by the more dramatic Deepwater Horizon oil disaster that was just winding down in the Gulf of Mexico.

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How Doctors Would Know If Syrians Were Hit With Nerve Gas

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

An international team of doctors is helping Syrian health workers recognize the signs of a chemical attack. They're also teaching them how to collect and preserve tissues as potential evidence if war crimes charges are brought.

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He Helped Discover Evolution, And Then Became Extinct

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Charles Darwin is known as the father of evolution. But another British naturalist, Alfred Russel Wallace, played a major role in developing the theory of natural selection before fading into obscurity. A trip to what's now Sulawesi in Indonesia, and the unique animals he found there, helped form his seminal ideas.

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Europe Bans Pesticides In Move To Protect Honey Bees

Monday, April 29, 2013

Three popular pesticides are being banned in the European Union, where officials are hoping the change helps restore populations of honey bees, vital to crop production, to healthy levels.

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Great Salt Lake Is No 'Dead Sea'

Friday, April 26, 2013

Parts of Utah's Great Salt Lake are 10 times saltier than the ocean. But the lake is host to plenty of life, including salt-loving microbes that can turn the lake's water bubblegum pink. Bonnie Baxter, director of the Great Salt Lake, discusses how the bugs might hold the secrets to better sunscreen, hydrogen fuel cells--even life on Mars.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Restaurants Reducing Food Waste in NYC

Friday, April 26, 2013

More than 100 restaurants will participate in the first-ever Food Waste Challenge, a new City program to reduce the amount of organic waste sent to landfills and the greenhouse gases that waste produces. Elizabeth Balkan, senior policy advisor for the NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability tells us about the program, participants, and the city's goals of reducing waste.

 

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Exploring Coffee's Past To Rescue Its Future

Friday, April 26, 2013

Today's commercial coffee production is based on only a tiny slice of the genetic varieties that have grown since prehistoric times. And that's a problem, because it leaves the world's coffee supply vulnerable to shocks like climate change, or the leaf rust currently ravaging Latin American coffee farms.

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Illinois River Crests To All-Time High Near Peoria

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Peoria has a front row seat to the great Illinois River flood of 2013. A temporary flood wall is in place and pumps are keeping the water at the lowest points from coming up through the sewers and into the store fronts. Whether their property is underwater or not, the resolve of people living and working along the Illinois River isn't wavering.

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Mississippi River's Many 'Parents' Look To Unify

Thursday, April 25, 2013

The Mississippi's stakeholders met recently to discuss the river's pressing needs, any common ground and how to speak with one voice in advocating for the nation's largest river system. Currently, the river has what one stakeholder calls "800 parents" — and that leaves the river an orphan.

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From Battle To Birds: Drones Get Second Life Counting Critters

Thursday, April 25, 2013

The U.S. Geological Survey is putting remotely piloted former military planes to work in the areas of environmental and wildlife management. Earlier this month, researchers spent three days counting sage grouse in rural Colorado. Next up: a survey of pygmy rabbit habitat in Idaho.

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