Streams

 

Environment

On Being

[Unedited] Wayne Curtis / Myrtle Thompson and Krista Tippett

Thursday, July 18, 2013

A Detroit you probably haven't seen in the news. It's a city of vigor — a place where neighbors are reimagining work, food, and the very meaning of humanity. To meet these people is to gain perspective on all of our work and imagine possibility.

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On Being

[Unedited] Gloria Lowe and Krista Tippett

Thursday, July 18, 2013

A Detroit you probably haven't seen in the news. It's a city of vigor — a place where neighbors are reimagining work, food, and the very meaning of humanity. To meet these people is to gain perspective on all of our work and imagine possibility.

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On Being

[Unedited] Richard Feldman and Krista Tippett

Thursday, July 18, 2013

A Detroit you probably haven't seen in the news. It's a city of vigor — a place where neighbors are reimagining work, food, and the very meaning of humanity. To meet these people is to gain perspective on all of our work and imagine possibility.

Comment

In Oregon, The GMO Wheat Mystery Deepens

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Government investigators are trying to solve an agricultural whodunit: How did genetically engineered wheat that was never approved for sale end up in a farmer's field in Oregon? Some are raising the possibility of sabotage; others suspect simple human error.

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Heavy Rains Send Iowa's Precious Soil Downriver

Friday, July 12, 2013

The biggest loser from this year's heavy rains in the Midwest is the land itself. An environmental group says 50 townships in Iowa have lost more than 5 tons of topsoil per acre, "more than what is tolerable over an entire year."

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Surf's Up for Pathogenic Viruses and Bacteria, Too

Friday, July 12, 2013

A day at the shore can leave beachgoers with more than a sunburn — a gulp of seawater can expose swimmers to disease-causing microbes like norovirus, salmonella, and adenovirus. Marine scientist Rachel Noble and environmental medicine researcher Samuel Dorevitch discuss the risk, and what's being done to limit swimmers' exposure.

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Tracking Shifting Sands Along the Nation's Coast

Friday, July 12, 2013

As New Yorkers braced themselves for Hurricane Sandy, coastal geologist Cheryl Hapke was out surveying Fire Island, a barrier island off the Long Island coast. Days later, Hapke was back to document the hurricane's effects and found a breach cutting the island in two. Now locals and scientists are debating whether the inlet should be filled in or left as nature intended.

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Trying to Energize the Push for a Smart Grid

Friday, July 12, 2013

For years, electrical experts have been calling for a "smart grid" that could better sense and adapt to changing conditions, from electrical outages to shifts in power consumption. Massoud Amin, referred to by some as the "father of the smart grid," talks about how and why the country should improve its aging electrical infrastructure.

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Environmentalists Warn Olympic Games Will Harm Sochi

Friday, July 12, 2013

Russia is preparing for the 2014 Winter Games — turning a sleepy valley in the Northern Caucasus Mountains into an Olympic village, with brand-new facilities for every Alpine sport. Officials say it will be a world-class destination for winter-sports enthusiasts long after the Games are over. Environmentalists say it's an ecological disaster in the making.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Gasland Part II - on Fracking

Thursday, July 11, 2013

Josh Fox, director of “Gasland Part II,” talks about hydraulic fracturing, the controversial method of extracting natural gas and oil, now being used worldwide. The film shows how the stakes have been raised on all sides of the issue, and looks at the influence oil and gas industries have in Washington. “Gasland Part II” airs on HBO in July 11 at 4:15 pm (see schedule for other screenings).

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Wastewater Wells, Geothermal Power Triggering Earthquakes

Thursday, July 11, 2013

Pumping industrial wastewater into storage wells deep underground can prime nearby faults for an earthquake. And studies show that a large quake — even one on the other side of the planet — can also push faults over the edge and set off a swarm of mini-earthquakes.

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Saving One Species At The Expense Of Another

Thursday, July 11, 2013

In Montana's Centennial Valley, conservationists made a grievous mistake while trying to save the trumpeter swan — they nearly wiped out Arctic grayling. Now they're looking for ways to make sure both species get a place on the ark.

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In Montana Wilds, An Unlikely Alliance To Save The Sage Grouse

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

The chicken-size sage grouse is as much a part of America's Western range as antelopes and cowboys. The birds nest beneath sagebrush, and as it disappears, so do the grouse. Biologists hope to protect the bird without starting a 21st century range war.

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Uncovering The Mystery Behind An Atlantic Tsunami

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

Scientists in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are still trying to understand what exactly caused a tsunami to strike the East Coast in June. There was no seismic record of the incident. But a team of scientists came together to analyze tidal and weather data. They believe the tsunami may have been caused by a weather phenomenon known as a "derecho."

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As Biotech Seed Falters, Insecticide Use Surges In Corn Belt

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

Across the corn belt, farmers are pulling out all the stops in their war on the corn rootworm. They're returning to chemical pesticides, because the weapons of biotechnology — inserted genes that are supposed to kill the rootworm — aren't working so well anymore.

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One Garden's Climate Struggle (And How To Save Yours)

Saturday, July 06, 2013

Two longtime gardeners share the changes they've seen over the years at Hillwood Estate in Washington, D.C. As blooming times become more sporadic, new flowers stand out as stars and an unwelcome fungus springs to life. Take notes: Your garden might benefit from some adjustments.

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When Is the Right Time To Give?

Friday, July 05, 2013

Volunteer firefighter Mark Bezos tells a story of an act of heroism that didn't go quite as expected — but that taught him a big lesson: Don't wait — give now.

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Film Rankles Environmentalists By Advocating Nuclear Power

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

A new documentary argues that environmentalists should favor nuclear power, not oppose it, on the grounds that the world's growing appetite for energy can't be met solely with wind and solar. Pandora's Promise is in theaters now, and not winning friends in the mainstream environmental movement.

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Wildfire Season So Far: Tragic, Destructive And Below Average

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

So far during the 2013 wildfire season, more than 800 homes and businesses have burned to the ground, nearly 1.6 million acres were scorched and over 23,000 blazes have required suppression. And two dozen firefighters have died. But as dramatic as it's been, the season has yet to kick into high gear.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Photographing the Changing Arctic

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Frances Beinecke, President of the Natural Resources Defense Council, and National Geographic photographer Paul Nicklen discuss the changing climate of the arctic, which Nicklen has been photographing for years. The NRDC is awarding Nicklen with a first-ever BioGems Visionary Award for his Arctic photography. Nicklen, born and raised on Baffin Island, Nunavut, grew up in one of the only non-Inuit families in a tiny native settlement amid the ice fields of Northern Canada. His photography book Polar Obsession captures up-close documentation of the lives of leopard seals, whales, walruses, polar bears, bearded seals, and narwhals, and gives a vivid portrait of two extraordinary, endangered ecosystems. 

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